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CAL1FORN1ANA 

SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 




SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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REFERENCE BOOK 




Not to be taken from the Library 








> M£WS - SPOfcTS - SOCIAL- COMMENT 



Vol. 2, No. 1 



January 3, 1936 



Five Cents 



nm 



NEWS ABOUT CHINA 




By Tsu 
AUTONOMOUS VS. SEMI-AUTONOMOUS 

The most urgent problem in North China at the pre- 
sent time confronting both Chinese and Japanese au- 
thorities is how to dispose of the so-called "East Hopei 
Anti-Communist Autonomous Council". Being pro- 
claimed by Yin Yu-keng, a noted pro-Japanese element 
and one time political commissioner in the North Chi- 
na demilitarized zone, the Council owes its existence to 
the influence of the Japanese army group in North Chi- 
na. Ever since the inception of this council, China has 
protested vigorously against Japan for allowing its mil- 
itary leaders to connive with the Chinese rebels in the 
separatist movement. Th central government in Nan- 
king, in the meantime, ordered the arrest of Yin Yu- 
keng for his rebellious act. 

In order to compromise with the Japanese demands, 
however, China set up the "Hopei Chahar Political 
Commission" which is semi-autonomous in character 
and which promises to meet the Japanese demand for 
suppressing anti-Japanese activities. With the estab- 
lishment of the new commission, it seems that there is 
no further ground to justify the existence of the "East 
Hopei Autonomous Council", as far as Japanese inter- 
est is concerned. 

Not only was there no indication from the part of 
the leaders of the autonomous state to wind up their 
business, but reports form these areas showed that the 
"new state" is sending troops to sweep around the coun- 
try in an attempt to enlarge their spheres cf influence. 
On December 29, two thousand irregulars under t.i; 
leadership of Liu Kwei-tong of the "new state" cap- 
tured the city of Changping which is only twenty-five 
miles away from Peiping, site of the Hopei Chahar 
political Commission. 

Among the Japanese military leaders, opinions differ 
as to whether the autonomous state should be merged 
into the semi-Autonomous commission. Some maintain- 
ed that the autonomous state must be kept intact in 
spite of the existence of the commission. Others felt 
that they should be merged into one political unit so 
as to put the government of the great provinces under 
the direct influence of the Japanese army. 

In an article in the Kokumin Shimbun or Japanese 
Nationalist News in Tokio, on Dec. 30 a prediction was 



Pan 

made that the Japanese army will present new demands 
to China. Among these demands is one calling for a 
merger of the autonomous and semi-autonomous poli- 
tical commissions in North China to form into one 
Eastern Hopei Anti-Communistic Association. This 
merger will presumably bring about a greater influence 
of Japanese military leaders into the government of 
these provinces. 

General Sung Cheh-yuan, chairman of the Hopei 
Chahar Political Commission, made it clear in Peiping 
that he would follow instructions from Nanking in 
making arrangements with Japanese militarists regard- 
ing the North China situation. He has already refer- 
red to Nanking some proposals advanced by Japanese 
army men regarding the nationalization of silver in the 
territory of the commission: the through traffic be- 
tween the Japanese owned South Manchuria Railway 
and Peiping- Liaoning Railway: revenue matters: and a 
possible agreement between Japan, North China and 
"Manchukuo" to suppress bandits and communists. 
Sung admitted that he will respect the Tangku Agree- 
ment between Chinese and Japanese railways. Accord- 
ingly, Nanking had dispatched Chang Chia-ngau, Min- 
ister of Railways to Peiping to confer with General Sung 
to make the necessary arrangements. 

The settlement of North China affairs depends 
greatly upon the return of General Kenjo Doihara, 
Japanese chief of military intelligence in North China, 
from Changchun where he is now conferring with 
"Emperor Pu Yi of Manchukuo". Doihara had pre- 
viously announced that Japanese activities in North 
China would follow the lines: (1) The Japanese army 
shall extend their influence step by step from Hopei 
and Chahar to Shansi, Suiyuan and Shantung, aiming 
to make the whole Central China pro- Japanese; (2) 
Japanese and Manchukuo military influence shall be 
used to assist Mongolia to achieve independence, so 
that Mongolia will be protected from the spread of 
Communism both from Russia and from China; (3) 
Japan will not set up any other state similar to "Man- 
chukuo" in these areas. From this statement it is in- 
intimated that whatever settlement that could be made 
in Hopei Chahar provinces now is only temporary in 
the path of the Japanese military expansion programme. 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



FAR EAST 



NEW ASTHMA DRUG 

Nanking, China — A drug which has 
been used since ancient times is more 
effective than ephedrine and atropine in 
treating asthma, it is claimed by research 
workers of the Nanking Health Admini- 
stration. It is derived from a species 
of corn, and soon the entire world may 
look to China for relief from asthma 
and chronic coughs. 

• • 

MAN MOANS OVER GOLDFISH 

Tientsin, China — So fond was this 
man Li Yen, of his pet goldfish, that he 
had no thoughts of anything else, neglec- 
ting even his wife. The scorned Mrs. 
Li "accidentally" dropped some medicine 
in the fishbowl. Mr. Li found his price- 
less treasure dead the next morning. 
After mourning for many days his 
senses finally left him. An attempt at 
suicide was prevented by his wife. It is 
reported that Li will never be his old 
self again. 

• • 

DR. SUN'S DAUGHTER AT HAWAII 
Miss Sally Y. Sun, daughter of Dr. 
Sun Yat-sen, is enrolled at the Univer- 
sity of Hawaii. She recently graduated 
from the True Light School of Canton. 

• • 

MORE SILVER LEAVES CHINA 

A shipment of silver weighing over 
10,000,000 ounces was placed aboard the 
S. S. President McKinley, sailing from 
Shanghai for Seattle. It was a consign- 
ment to the United States from the Chi- 
nese government banks, and was re- 
ported to have been purchased through 
the New York Chase National Bank. 

• • 
PICTURE POSTPONED 

"Heartaches", scheduled to be shown 
on Jan. 1 at the Mandarin Theatre, has 
been indefinitely postponed. Opening 
date will be announced later. 



"See Our Windows 

for Gift Suggestions" 

The 

GOLDEN STAR RADIO 
COMPANY 

QUALITY WORK 

CONSISTENT WITH 

LOWEST REPAIR PRICES 

846 Clay St. CHina 2322 

San Francisco, California 



TRIBUTE TO NATION- 
ALIST HEROES 

As a lasting tribute to the officers and 
soldiers of the Nationalist troops killed 
in the Sino-Japanese hostilities and the 
anti-Communist suppression campaigns, 
a war heroes' tomb was dedicated in an 
impressive ceremony in Nanking on 
Nov. 20, 1935. That day witnessed the 
Capital bedecked with Chinese flags 
flown at half-mast. General Chiang Kai- 
shek, Chairman of the Military Affairs 
Commission, officiated at the commemor- 
ation service, and because it was held 
while the Fifth National Congress of the 




Monument in form of a pagoda 
over war heroes' tomb. 



LJL 



Kuomintang was in session, about 650 
delegates attending the Congress paid 
their respects to the war dead. Bodies 
of representatives of the various army 
divisions were buried in the tomb. 

The war heroes' tomb is situated at 
the foot of the Purple Mountain, near 
the late Dr. Sun Yat-sen's mausoleum. 
The beautiful scenery and serenity of its 
vicinity, with the mausoleum command- 
ing the view of all, serve as a fitting 
background for the commemoration of 
the sacrificial spirit of the fallen warriors. 



ALFRED B. CHONC 

INSURANCE 

Kansas City Life Insurance Co. 

Office SUtter 3995; Res. PRospect 813? 

Ill Sutter St., San Francisco 



BRIEF BIOGRAPHY SKETCH 
Short, interesting biographical 
sketches or antecdotes about Chi- 
nese currently in the eyes of the 
world will be found regularly 
under the above heading in the 
Chinese Digest 



HO YING-CHIN 

Ho Ying-chin, military officer, was 
born at Hsingi, Kweichow in 1889. He 
graduated from the Japanese Military 
Officers' College in Tokyo and joined the 
Tung Ming Hui in Japan. He was prin- 
cipal of Yunnan Military Institute from 
1920 to 1923, and the following year be- 
came dean of the Whampoa Military 
Cadets' Academy. 

He commanded the First Division of 
the Nationalist northern punitive army 
and participated in the campaign against 
Chen Chiung-ming (who then rebelled 
against Dr. Sun). In 1926 he was in 
charge of the rear command in Kwang- 
tung. when the Nationalists advanced 
into the Yangtsze Province and later 
was in command of the East Route Rev- 
olutionary Army which occupied most 
of Kiangsi Province. He transferred his 
army to the Fukien front, and after the 
pacification of the province, was appoint- 
ed acting Chairman of the Fukien Pro- 
vincial Government, 1926. 

From Fukien, he advanced into Che- 
kiang and participated in the fighting 
that eliminated Sun Chuan-fang from 
Yangtsze Provinces. After Sun's defeat 
he concentrated his forces at Nanking, 
where he- in association with Bei Tsung- 
hsi and Li Tsung-jen, repulsed Sun's last 
attempt to return to Kiangsi during the 
decisive battle of Lungtun, near Chin- 
kiang, Kiangsu in 1927. 

After the retirement of Chiang-Kai- 
shek, he withdrew his troops into Che- 
kiang and was appointed chairman of 
Chekiang Provincial Government- 1928. 
Upon Chiang Kai-shek's return to power, 
the same year, he was appointed assistant 
chief of staff of the Nationalist General- 
issimo's Headquarters. 

Ho Ying-chin, has been a member of 
the Central Executive Committee since 
1926; State councillor- since 1928; mem- 
ber of the Central Political Council, 
since 1927; Director-General of Military 
Training, 1928-30; Director of the Field 
Headquarters of the Generalissimo of 
the National Army at Chengchow, Hona- 
1930; Minister of Military Administra- 
tion, December, 1930. 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



EAGLE SCOUTS TOUR TOWN 

In conjunction with the annual con- 
vention of the Eagle Scouts, Knights of 
Dunamis, held at the Fairmont Hotel 
last week, Arthur Chin, Chinese Eagle 
Scout of Troop Three, conducted his 
colleagues on a tour through Chinatown, 
with the able help of Scouts Ernest Lum, 
James Jang, and Vincent Gunn. Ray- 
mond O. Hanson, grand patron general, 
founded the organization ten years ago. 
Arthur is reported to be the only Chi- 
nese Eagle Scout in the world. 

• • 

HEALD COLLEGE EXHIBIT ENDS 

The two day exhibition held by the 
Chinese students of Heald College end- 
ed with prizes valued at over two hun- 
dred dollars being awarded. 

Among the interesting exhibits were 
a Ford V-8 cutaway motor and chassis 
showing the various "innards" of the 
engine; the oscillograph, which trans- 
mutes wave forms into visible patterns, 
a "hot dog" which was electrocuted for 
the edification of the reporter, done by 
passing a current through the weinie, 
which sets up a high resistance to the 
passage of the current, thereby cooking 
its own goose, so to speak, from within; 
a demonstration of the effects of liquid 
air, which turned a piece of 'bak choy' 
immersed in it so hard and brittle that 
it shattered like so much glass when 
dropped. 

But the most interesting exhibit of all 
was a working model of a locomotive, 
built by a member of the faculty of 
Heald College, which is able to pull a 
load of 1,200 pounds. The engine is 
about seven feet long, and weighs 183 
pounds, 73 of which is the tender. (The 
working pressure of the engine is ninety 
pounds of steam.) 

At present there are about 40 students 
in the various schools ac the college, 
which is headed by T. B. Bridges. 

Seth Gibbons, Director of the Auto- 
motive and Diesel School, was the spon- 
sor of the exhibition, which was con- 
ducted entirely by the Associated Chi- 
nese Students of Heald College. 



HOWARD MACEE 

COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 

• 

Anglo Bank Bldg. - 830 Market St. 

EXbrook 0298 San Francisco 



LOS ANGELES 

L. A. TENNIS CLUB NEWS 

Hamilton Gee and Mrs. Mamie Sing 
were crowned men's singles and women's 
singles champions, respectively, of the 
Los Angeles Chinese Tennis Club at its 
Second Annual Dinner Dance at the 
Cafe de Paree Dec. 13. Gee and Mrs. 
Sing also captured the mixed doubles 
title. 

Dr. Edward Lee, club president, pre- 
sided at the dinner and introduced the 
honored guests, Mr. and Mrs. Dudley C. 
Shumway. Mr. Shumway presented the 
trophies and medals to the champions. 
This is the second year that Gee has won 
the men's singles title. If he retains it 
for another year, the silver perpetual 
trophy will automatically become his 
permanent property. Mrs. Sing won the 
women's singles for the first time, Betty 
Chow being the title-holder last year. 

Dancing and entertainment by the 
Cafe de Paree's floor show climaxed the 
club's activities for the year. 
• • 

CHINA SOCIETY OF 
SO. CALIFORNIA 

Over a hundred guests and members 
of the China Society of Southern Cali- 
fornia attended the December meeting 
recently at Tuey Fong Low Cafe, Los 
Angeles. 

Their dinner program took in a dis- 
cussion of Chinese art and literature. Dr 
Wm. F. Hummel, Professor of History 
at U.S.C., was the presiding officer, due 
to the absence of Peter Soo Hoo, presi- 
dent. 

Among the distinguished guests were: 
Mrs. N. A. Putman, President of the 
Colony League of Southern California; 
Miss Fannie Dillon, Vice President of 
McDowell League of Los Angeles; Mrs. 
Lulu Tefft, founder and President of the 
Society for Advancement of Music; 
Joseph Choate, nephew of Joseph Choate, 
Ambassador of the United States to Eng- 
land, and who has just returned from 
the League of Nations; and many other 
guests who have just returned from 
China. 

Dr. Herbert E. House, who was for 
many years connected with the Lingnan 
University of Canton, was the main 
speaker of the evening. He discussed the 
"basic character of the Chinese lan- 
guage." He analyzed that word in its 
parts to show its meaning and, incident- 
ally, to indicate the ideal of the Chinese 
people. 

Rev. T. T. Taam of the Chinese Con- 



SQUARE AND CIRCLE CHRISTMAS 
VISITS 

The Saturday before Christmas was a 
busy one, as it has been for the past seven 
years, for the Square and Circle Club. 

This year six members, Mrs. Peter 
Wong, Mrs Ira Lee, and Misses Janet 
Hoo, Margaret Tarn, Alice P. Fong, and 
Beverly Wong, representing the club 
delivered toys to 44 Chinese children in 
the San Francisco County Hospital. To 
3 1 Chinese residents at the Laguna 
Honda Home, they also brought gifts 
and Chinese edibles. Each year these 
aged Chinese look forward to this visit 
as it is one of the very few means by 
which they are able to send messages to 
their friends in Chinatown. 

Another phase of the club's Christmas 
work is the sending of gifts or educa- 
tional magazine subscriptions to the 
children of Chung Mei Home, Ming 
Quong Home and the Chinese Metho- 
dist Episcopal Home. 

• • 

While leisurely eating at a cafe in 
Bakersfield, Chang Ling, a Chinese mer- 
chant, was suddenly spirited away by 
immigration officers, who claimed that 
he was in the United States illegally. 
However, after a thorough investigation, 
Chang was found to be a citizen. 

gregational Church, read poetry in Chi- 
nese, with English translation. A mag- 
nificent Sung scroll, owned by Dr. Tom 
Chong, was exhibited after dinner. Dr. 
von Koerber head of the Oriental Studies 
Department at U.S.C., explained the 
reading of this beautiful picture, which 
has been in the possession of the Tom 
family for many generations, and is of 
great value. 

The China Society is a newly organ- 
ized group whose aim is to promote a 
friendly understanding between the Chi- 
nese and Americans. Its main objective 
is to develop an appreciation of Chinese 
culture and of things Chinese. Another 
is to aid the students from China in 
whatever way possible. 

The present officers are: Vice Consul 
Yi-seng Kiang, honorary president; Peter 
Soo Hoo president; Dr. Wm. F. Hum- 
mel, vice president; John K. Leverman, 
secretary; Alice Leong, treasurer; and 
Herbert E. House, executive secretary. 

The Executive Board consists of I. L. 
Chow, David Faries, Dr. Wm. F. Hum- 
mel, S. K. Lau, Dr. Wm. Lyons, Dr. 
Hans von Koerber, Dr. Wm. Y. Lee, Mrs. 
Bessie Ochs, Mrs. Alfred Swan, Dr. 
Dennis Smith and S. Schwartzberg. 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



CATHOLIC MOTHERS' 
CLUB 

The St. Mary's Mothers' Club, which 
confines its program to works of charity 
and religious activities of the Catholic 
Chinese Mission, has just concluded its 
second year. At its last meeting the fol- 
lowing officers were chosen to continue 
the work of the club in 1936: president, 
Mrs. Kwong Sun; vice-president, Yee 
Chan Shee; treasurer, Tom Lee Shee; 
secretary, Mrs. Emily Chan; and social 
secretary, Yee Ng Shee. 

Last week the club donated fifty 
pounds of candy for the St. Mary's 
School's Christmas program. On New 
Year's Day the members gave a chop 
suey dinner to the religious community 
of the Helper of the Holy Souls. One 
of the members of this community, 
Mother St. Rosa, a social worker, is an 
active member of the Mothers' Club. Be- 
cause of her knowledge of spoken Chi- 
nese, Mother St. Rosa has been a great 
aid in the club's religious activities. 

• • 

WONGS HAVE XMAS BABY 

Santa Claus brought 3 year old Win- 
ston Wong a baby brother, Wilton, on 
Christmas Day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wyman Wong (Paul- 
ine Owyang), 950 Clay Street, are the 
proud parents of the seven and a half 
pound boy. 



CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 

> <S£?~~csrK3g <S£z^<zr*zis> ef^HRrs^ 



CHICAGO BAZAAR 

The bazaar recently given by the 
Chicago Young China's Auxiliary at 
the On Leong School netted approxi- 
mately one hundred dollars. There were 
several door prizes. Flowers donated by 
friends were sold as boutonnieres while 
Rose Moy and May Lum conducted a 
fortune teller's booth. Chinese relics 
and wares were also sold, which added 
greatly to the financial outcome of the 
bazaar. 




Miss Jadin Wong, popular dancer 
at a local cafe. 



C. C. Y. M. A. ELECTION 

Concluding its eighth year of social, 
religious, and educational activities, the 
Chinese Catholic Young Men's Associa- 
tion recently held its last meeting for the 
current year and elected the following 
officers for the 1936 term: president, 
John Chinn; treasurer, James H. Lee; 
superintendent, James Chu; Chinese 
secretary, Chan Hing Yuen; English 
secretary, William Hsieh; and social 
secretary, Harry J. Gee. 

The report in Chinese of the Associa- 
tion's varied activities for the year 1935 
is embodied in the current issue of The 
Aurora, official organ of the organiza- 
tion, now in its 8th volume. The Aurora 
is a bilingual publication, in English and 
Chinese, and carries articles of general 
interest. 

The Association has announced that 
the annual banquet fir its members and 
non-member friends will be held on 
Jan. 4. 



FIRECRACKERS 



This column is conducted for 
the benefit of our readers, under 
which they may submit suggestions 
and comments on any and all 
topics pertaining to the Chinese 
people or country. 



Dear Editor: 

I have just finished reading issue num- 
ber seven of your splendid publication 
The CHINESE DIGEST, and feel as 
though you and your staff are doing 
much to enlighten the American people 
of the ways of the Chinese people, their 
thoughts, aims, and ambitions. 

The Chinese Digest was introduced to 
me by your circulation manager, and 
former circulation manager of the Eve- 
ning World, Robert Poon, right after 
the first day of publication. I have 
watched the publication grow in its short 
two months of life, and each issue im- 
proves over the previous one. 

The Chinese Digest is, I believe, the 
only Chinese magazine published by the 
Chinese in the English language, and 
you and your staff are to be congratu- 
lated upon undertaking such a large task. 

Your columnists, Clara Chan, Ethel 
Lum, William Hoy, Chingwah Lee, 
Fred Woo, and .Bob Poon, are to be 
congratulated upon the manner of pre- 
senting the different phases of Chinese 
thought and interest. 

Wishing you and your staff a very 
successful New Year, I remain, 

Sincerely yours, 
Elmer W. Koehler. 
Editor, The Evening World. 

New Scout Troop Formed 

The Chinese Methodist Boy Scouts, a 
newly organized troop, will be officially 
inaugurated into the Boy Scouts Asso- 
ciation at a service to be held at the 
Chinese Methodist Church, 920 Wash- 
ington St., Jan. 5, at 7 p. m. Raymond 
O. Hanson and J. Thomas MacFadden, 
executive and assistant executive of the 
Boy Scouts' San Francisco Area Council 
will be present to award the membership 
charter to the new troop of 20 h. 
Chester Smith is Scoutmaster and Al- 
bert Park Li, assistant Scoutmaster. The 
Scout Committee includes Rov S. Tom, 
and Edwin Owyang, leaders of boys' and 
young peoples activities at the Metho- 
dist Church, with David K. Lee as chair 
man. 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 5 



TEA AND LANTERNS 



Young Wo Chinese School 

Young Wo Chinese School's gradua- 
tion exercises were held in its auditorium 
last week for the grammar and high 
school grades. Several hundred parents 
and friends filled the place to capacity. 
Lum Tid Hong, a member of the 
faculty, presided as chairman. 

The program included: singing of 
the Chinese national hymn; tribute to 
the late Dr. Sun Yat-sen, reading of the 
Three People's Principles by Fong Ging 
Won, dean; speeches by Ng Doon Foon, 
principal and other well known Chinese; 
response by student representatives Low 
You Ming and Miss Bow Lin; and pre- 
sentation by Lum Tid Hong of awards 
to students. A picture was taken of the 
entire gathering. 

Ng May Lun who won highest scho- 
lastic honors, was awarded a globe of the 
world. Entertainment and refreshments 
concluded the exercises. 



CHUNG WAH GRADUATION 

Chung Wah Middle School an- 
nounced the closing of their semester on 
December 24. Registration of all old 
and new students will begin Jan. 6. 

Graduation exercises were held last 
week and a short program followed: 
reading by Lee Gim Fong, school dean; 
entertainment by Tom Yit Quey and 
Yep Fung Sil, students; speeches by 
Chew Kow Su, principal, and other 
members of the faculty. 

NAM KUE SCHOOL VACATION 

The termination of the winter seme- 
ster of the Nam Kue Chinese School was 
announced by its principal, Kang S. 
Hong, at a meeting held last week at 
the school auditorium. Many represen- 
tatives from the Fook Yum Tong Asso- 
ciation attended. Awards were made to 
students of the different grades, with the 
highest scholarship. A large number of 
newspapermen and photographers were 
present. 

One of the students who graduated 
from the Oakland High School was Ro- 
bert Lew, son of a prominent Oakland 
merchant, Lew Gunn Sing. Graduation 
exercises will be held Jan. 24. Bob is 
reported to be preparing to enter an 
institution of higher learning possibly 
the University of Californa. 



DEPUTY CONSUL SUN HAS 
OPEN HOUSE 

Our snooping reporter came forth 
with the news that a delightful house 
party was given by Mr. and Mrs. Patrick 
Sun, Deputy Consul for the Republic of 
China, in celebration of the new year. 
Among the guests present were Mr. and 
Mrs. Leland Kimlau. Kimlau broke a 
5 year resolution not to touch a drop of 
liquor — doctor's orders. However, when 
the fifth bottle of champagne popped, 
and all those present proposed a toast 
to the delightful "Sunny Sun" couple, 
Leland blushingly allowed a bubble to 
touch his lips. The party did not end 
until six o'clock the next morning. 

• • 

"B" SCOUTS REUNION 

Boy Scouts of Troop Three, Division 
B, will hold a reunion dinner Sunday, 
Jan. 5, at the Sun Hung Heung Cafe 
at 6 p. m. Ted Lee and Henry Owyang 
are in charge of plans. 

Division B was organized in 1926 and 
before that was known as the Wolf 
Cubs, with but seven members. At pres- 
ent the "B" boys have a membership of 
fifty; among them being Warren Chang, 
Jim Chinn, Harry Louie, Wilson Louie, 
and George Young, who is now residing 
in Salinas. 



LOOS HAVE CHRISTMAS 
EVE PARTY 

'Twas the night before Christmas, but 
everything was astir at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ernest Loo in Oakland. 

Friends from the bay cities and one 
from as far away as Honolulu, were in- 
vited to the house party, which ended 
with a buffet supper in the wee hours 
of Christmas morn. 

• • 

MISSION DANCE 

In spite of the heavy rain that fell 
during the Mission Chinese Students 
Club dance on Dec. 28, the YW dance 
floor was filled. Music by the Rhythm 
Kings of Ed Murphy furnished an in- 
centive for the dancers to display their 
terpischorean technique. Especially pop- 
ular were the tag dances, which helped 
the stag line get dances which otherwise 
would not be theirs. Several hundred 
attended this affair, and the officers of 
the club should be complimented on the 
fine showing. 



Francisco Jr. High 
Graduates 

Forty-three Chinese graduates this 
term of the Francisco Junior High will 
hold their dinner-dance at the New 
Shanghai Cafe on Jan. 23. Honoring 
the graduating members, the Francisco 
Chinese Students' Club will sponsor an 
invitational dance at the Garden Room, 
940 Powell Street. The affair will start 
at eight and end at eleven-thirty in the 
evening. Two hundred guests are ex- 
pected. 

Present officers of the club are: presi- 
dent, Ray Chung; vice president, Mabel 
Lee; secretary, Mary Ow; treasurer, 
Pearl Mew; and advisor, Mrs. Pearson, 
member of Francisco Junior High 
faculty. 

• • 

CHICAGO GIRLS' XMAS PARTY 

A Christmas party was given by the 
Chicago Chinese Girls Club at their club- 
room, 2327 Wentworth Avenue, for the 
Chinese children on Dec. 23. A bright 
ly illuminated tree and gifts gladdened 
the hearts of these children. Games and 
ice cream were included in the program 
planned by Gertrude Moy, chairman. 

• • 

DANCING INTO 1936 

Many of Chinatown's younger set 
rang in the new year at Cathay's New 
Year's Eve Dance at Trianon Ballroom. 
A spirit of gaiety and lightheartedness 
prevailed, and the dancers were reluc- 
tant to leave when the bells chimed three 
o'clock in the morning. 

• • 

OPEN HOUSE 

Mr. and Mrs. Yee Wong held open 
house on Christmas Day. Among those 
present were: Dr. and Mrs. Alexander 
B. Chinn, Messers. and Mesdames 
Wye Wing, Myron Chan, Patrick Sun, 
and Paul Kenny; Misses Virginia Quon, 
Clara Chan, Kay Lee, Dorothy Cunning- 
ham; Messers. Albert Lee, Wong Ton, 
Ben Choye. 



BEN CHEY 



"Drive in your old car and Drive out 

in a 1936 Ford' 

AUTO REPAIR SHOP 

725 Pacific St. GAr. 4592 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



THE STORY OF CERAMIC ART 



(VI) How To Study Spur Marks 

As previously stated, spur marks — 
prop marks, or crow claws — are traces 
left on a vessel which indicate that it had 
rested on bits of clay or other material 
during the firing process. This is so that 
glaze on the vessel being fired will not 
adhere to the surface on which it is rest- 
C^ing. After firing, these spurs are, of 
cauirse, knocked or chipped off the ves- 
sel\ The size, shape, number, location, 
and "position of these spur marks are of 
great importance in giving a clue as to 
the method of firing and may even hint 
of the center from which the wares 
originated. 

Composition of Spurs 

Spur marks consist typically of adhe- 
sion of a part of the spurs, props, bars, 
balls, rings, cones or pillars on which the 
vessel rested during the firing process. 
These spurs may or may not be of the 
same material as the biscuit. The Han 
and T'ang wares generally rested on 
spurs of the same material as do many 
modern English crockery and Japanese 
porcelains. Many Sung and Ming pot- 
tery, on the other hand, rested on very 
porous, white, chalky spurs. The mod- 
ern Chinese spoons and table ornaments, 
likewise, often rested on some dark 
brown, brittle pottery spurs. 

In place of adhesion the spur marks 
may merely consist of patches or chipped 
areas which indicate the probable location 
of the spurs. If these patches are located 
at equal distances from each other, and 
the minimum number is three we have 
reason to believe that they are spur marks 
and not fortuitous chippings. 

These patches may be cleanly chipped 
to just the level of the biscuit, and so 
give a clear outline of the size and shape 
of the spurs. This is especially so if the 
spurs had rested on a thinly glazed sur- 
face, or if the surface browning of the 
biscuit near the spurs has not been 
marred. But in many cases the chipping 
has been roughly done or chipped so 
far below the surface of the biscuit that 
the size and shape of the spurs may only 
be roughly surmised. Sometimes these 
depressions left by the grinding are 
filled with cement, and this must not 
be mistaken for spurs. 

Sometimes the entire base or resting 
surface of the vessel may be grounded 
smooth, leaving no spur marks at all. 
This is especially true of most T'ang 



wares, where special pains were appar- 
ently taken to remove all traces of spurs 
and to insure an even, flat base. Hence 
a plain flat surface does not preclude the 
absence of spurs, unless that surface is en- 
tirely covered with an unmarred stretch 
of glaze, slip, surface browning, or min- 
ute wheel rings. 

Where Spurs are Located 

The location of the spurs are highly 
indicative of the position of firing. The 
earliest wares were generally fired in an 
inverted positon so that the bottom of 
the vessels served to keep the fuel from 
entering the inside of the wares, result- 
ing in excessive smoking and disturbed 
firing. 

With the coming of the kilns the ves- 
sels are often fired in an upright posi- 
tion, and the spur marks are typically 
found on the bottom or base of the ves- 
sels. (The base of T'ang and pre-T'ang 
vessels are flat, no foot rim being em- 
ployed till the end of the T'ang 
Dynasty) . But some vessels are still fired 
in an inverted position, indicated by the 
location of the spur marks on the mouth 
rim of the wares. This is further sub- 
stantiated by the thickening or forming 
tears on the mouth rim. Or it is hinted 
at by the base being completely unmarred 
by spur markings. 

Methods of Stacking 

However, the spur marks on the mouth 
rim alone is no proof of inverted firing 
position. Sometimes spur marks are 
found on both the mouth rim and the 
base of the vessel. While this may indi- 
cate secondary firing, it is more probable 
that the wares were fired in stacks. Three 
methods of stacking were employed by 
the early Chinese potters. Many Han 
jars were fired "mouth to mouth", one 
jar being inverted over another upright 
jar, their mouth rims being separated by 
bars or other props. They may be 
stacked with all the mouth rims facing 
down, each jar again separated by props. 
Finally, all the wares may be stacked in 
an upright position. One Sung bowl in 
my possession has spur marks on the 
foot rim and the inside bottom. Such 
bowls were fired in stacked, upright posi- 
tion; further indicated by the glaze 
thickening toward the base. 

A large mouth Ming style graffiato 
notterv jar has an unmarred, glazed base, 
but also a smooth, gWsd mouth rim, no 
sour marks being found on either end. 
Examination revealed a faint "crow 



(V) CHINA HAD THE FIRST 
LEAGUE OF NATIONS. 

During the Chou Dynasty (B. C. 
1122-255) the Chinese had a feudal 
system similar to the one in Europe dur- 
ing the middle ages and to the one in 
Japan up to three generations ago. 
Kingship was indicated by a set of "gad- 
gets" — the crown, the sceptre, the throne, 
and the kingly cloak. The supporting 
nobility was divided into five classes — 
the duke, marquis, count, viscount, and 
baron. The above mentioned institu- 
tions are to be regarded as inventions — 
machinery which were the products of 
men's mind. It is very improbable that 
they had independent origins. The 
Chinese kingly insignia play very minor 
roles, but whether or not this represents 
central or marginal weakening of cul- 
tural traits is very difficult to determine. 

Toward the end of the Chou Dynasty, 
the feudal system broke down, and "Chi- 
na" became a group of warring states, 
each fighting for supremacy. In addi- 
tion, border states (wei pong), outside 
the pale of Chinese civilization", were 
encroaching upon the scene. The 
"hunnish nations" (hsiung-nu) were 
often the most successful. 

In the year B. C. 681, a league was 
formed for mutual self-defense as well 
as for non-military matters. This league 
had a president with limited power. His 
investure was performed by the Ruler 
of Chou, who by that time was merely a 
figurehead. In the year 545 B. C. one 
Hsi Hsiang proposed the incorporation 
of all existing states (Chinese and non- 
Chinese), each to receive definite power 
and each to pledge military aid to weak- 
er nations should they be invaded. The 
league lasted two centuries, finally reach- 
ing an end because the stronger nations 
were not willing to submit to any 
"World Court", and because the petty 
states were jealous of each other. A 
popular historical drama which is often 
presented locally, "Premier of Six Na- 
tions" (Lu Kuo Feng Shang, or in Can- 
tonese, Luk Kwok Fung Sheung) por- 
trays a later attempt in B. C. 333 when 
one Su Ch'in proposed a league of six 
nations against a powerful seventh. He 
(Continued on Page 15) 

claw" consisting of five closely set radiat- 
ing spurs, located on the inside bottom 
of the vessel, thus indicating inverted, 
unstacked, firing position. 

Copyrighted. 191>. by Chingwih Ltt 

(Next Week: How Props are Arranged.) 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 7 



CHIANG-KAI-SHEK'S 
MESSAGE 

CHINA'S FOREIGN RELATIONS 

by 
General Chiang Kai-shek 

Chairman of Military Affairs Commission 

Speech delivered before the 

Fifth National Congress of the Kuomintang 

on November 19, 1935 



It is most gratifying to observe that 
during the past few days the work be- 
fore this Plenary Session of the Fifth 
National Congress of Kuomintang has 
been taken up in a spirit of unity and 
co-operation. Such a hearty atmosphere 
is indeed most fortunate for the future 
of the country. I take this opportunity 
to lay before you without reserve the 
status of our foreign relations during the 
past few years for your study and con- 
sideration. 

There are three points which I wish 
to bring out this morning. First, ever 
since the incident of September 18, 1931, 
and subsequently the affairs at Shanghai 
and in North China, our people have 
been in a continuous state of distress and 
suffering. As one of the Members of the 
Standing Committee of the Kuomintang, 
I have been most painfully aware of the 
seriousness of my responsibility. Through 
these troublous times, however, I believe 
that the nation as a whole has come to 
realize that the '^Nationalist Movement" 
as set forth in our late leader's San Min 
Chu I, deals not only with our foreign 
policy but also with internal regenera- 
tion, the former being merely a part of 
the whole. In other words, while we 
must strive for equality and indepen- 
dence among nations, as our leader had 
enjoined, we must also learn to be strong 
and self-reliant. In his "Plans for Na- 
tional Reconstruction", and "Fundamen- 
tals of National Reconstruction", and 
particularly his Fifth Lecture on Nation- 
alism, we are clearly taught that while 
we should strive for freedom and equa- 
lity for our people with other nations 
through the abolition of unequal treaties, 
we should at the same time endeavor to 
bring about spiritual regeneration and 
material reconstruction within the coun- 
try. It was urged upon the entire nation 
that we should struggle to regain our 
national strength through self-develop- 
ment. It behooves us, therefore, to re- 
flect upon the extent to which this work 
has been carried out during the past 
years as well as to fully realize the double 
aspect of the Nationalist Movement and 
the need of its balanced progress upon 
which the hope of success is really 
hinged. If we were to emphasize either 



phase of it at the expense of the other, 
we may be confronted with unexpected 
reverses, for this is in the very nature 
of things. 

Secondly, let us realize that interna- 
tional relations are entirely different 
from individual relations. Between 
nations there is no such thing as lasting 
enmity, for say, — even a hundred years. 
European history has shown how nations 
which had been the bitterest enemies be- 
came friends, and how even the best 
of friends at another time flew at each 
other's throat. This is because inter- 
national relations, in their very nature, 
are, at best, complicated and complex 
and are unlike the relations between indi- 
viduals which are far more simple. 
Again, nation A and nation B, viewed 
from certain circumstance or angle may 
find it seemingly impossible to be friends; 
but viewed from another angle and un- 
der another circumstance, there is no 
possibility of their becoming anything 
but friends. There are many instances 
of the above situation between the na- 
tions. Therefore international relations 
are relative; not absolute. In other 
words, in deciding upon the foreign poli- 
cy of a nation, be it friendly or hostile 
toward others, the welfare of the country 
and the interest of the people as a whole, 
and not the temporary sentiments and 
particular interests should be taken into 
consideration. It is a rule to be observed 
by responsible statesmen and revolution- 
ary party members that to decide upon 
a foreign policy they must consider the 
relative urgency as well as the expedien- 
cy of our needs. 

For our suffering of repeated national 
humiliation, we should inquire within 
ourselves and constantly read the 5th 
chapter of Dr. Sun Yat-sen's Principle 
of Democracy. Summarily, the late 
leader had warned us that there are more 
than one country that can destroy China; 
and this should give us a rude awaken- 
ing. For we must realize that this un- 
precedented national crisis is by no 
neans accidental. Mencius once said, 
"A man must first despise himself, and 
then others will despise him. A king- 
dom must first smite itself, and then 
others will smite it." This was often 
quoted to us by Dr. Sun. So, if we 
abuse ourselves and do not make efforts 
to be strong and self-reliant, then those 
nations friendly to us today might be- 
come our enemies to-morrow; and on 
the other hand, if we can become strong 
and self-reliant, it is not impossible that 
our foes of today may become our friends 
of to-morrow. The old adages "People 
help those who help themselves" and 
"welfare must be sought by oneself", 



state the same truth. What I wish to 
emphasize to-day is that during this na- 
tional crisis we must do our utmost to 
help ourselves and seek our own salva- 
tion. 

Thirdly, our national revolution is not 
yet complete. In a nation undergoing a 
transitional state in its revolution, clashes 
between the old order of things and the 
new are unavoidable, and criticisms and 
obstacles are to be expected. This~is 
true in both foreign and domestic 
affairs. During this period we should 
pay particular attention to two things. 
First, the completion of the ground- 
work of nation-building should be our 
common creed and undue attention need 
not be paid to temporary expediency. 
This is what Confucius meant when he 
said," Want of forbearance in small 
matters spoils great plans", for diplom- 
acy in extraordinary times can never be 
conducted by ordinary procedure. Se- 
condly, international relations are sub- 
ject to constant changes, so when any- 
thing happens, we must decide speedily 
to meet the requirements of the occasion. 
Let us look back at the experience of 
the various European countries during 
the revolutionary period after the great 
War. Their external and internal diffi- 
culties and obstacles were similar to ours 
during the past decade, but because their 
leaders and peoples were guided by com- 
mon convictions and because their lead- 
ers had the authority to settle each prob- 
lem as it arose, the crises were averted 
and the national foundations finally 
made safe. 

The Chinese race occupies one-fourth 
of the world's population so that the 
rise or fall of our nation must have a 
great effect on world peace as well as 
the welfare of mankind, a fact which 
must have been well realized by all states- 
men of the friendly powers. . . . What we 
have been striving for incessantly is 
nothing more than our existence as a 
nation and co-existence with other coun- 
tries in the family of nations. 

I believe when we have achieved pro- 
gress through our intensive reconstruc- 
tion program, and dealt with all friendly 
nations in full sincerity, we shall, some 
day, attain internal understanding and 
international goodwill. 

From the three points mentioned 
above, we may draw the conclusion that 
if international developments do not 
menace our national existence or block 
the way of our national regeneration, 
we should, in view of the interest of the 
whole nation, practice forbearance in 
facing issues not of a fundamental na- 

(Continued on Page 15) 



Page 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, £2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, #2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 



STAFF 



CHING WAH LEE __ 

WILLIAM HOY 

FRED GEORGE WOO 

CLARA CHAN 

ETHEL LUM 

ROBERT G. POON 

GEORGE CHOW 



..Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Sports 



Fashions 

-Community Welfare 

Circulation 

Advertising 



OUR DUTY AND YOURS— 

Just once in so many years does anything unusual 
happen in Chinatown. And only once in a great many 
years does a new paper start. 

In the first issue of the Chinese Digest it was 
pointed out that the purpose of this publication is to 
represent Chinese interests in America; to keep alive 
the culture that made us a great people; and to share 
and exchange ideas of the Eastern and the Western 
world. 

Let us all take inventory of ourselves and our 
future. Let us have an open forum, and discuss plans 
for the future. Let us have more exchange of students 
with China, to learn, of the old country. Let us havt 
a conference of businessmen and of students — let it be 
held in San Francisco in 1938 — so that old friends and 
old residents may come to help celebrate the big fair. 

It will promote old business, establish new busi- 
ness and industry in China will benefit through in- 
creased sales, with increased profits for everyone. 

OUR duty lies in keeping the Chinese people in 
America informed — in fighting for our rights and 
any injustice to the Chinese. 

YOUR duty lies in giving this paper your support. 
Your duty lies in portraying to the American people 
the culture and refinement of the Chinese. 

A space is reserved for the news of every China- 
town in America. A space is reserved for news of 
interest to the Chinese in all parts of the world, and 
for the enlightenment of other people in regard to 
Chinese art, culture, history, philosophy, and literature. 

Yes, a space is reserved for each one of us to 
better ourselves. Not necessarily Chinese. Not neces- 
sarily American. If you approve of our policy, write 
and let us know. A list of our endorsers is soon to be 



published. Confucius, when asked for a single sent- 
ence or word explaining his teachings, answered, 
"Reciprocity." 

The Chinese Digest is on its way. Won't you 
join us? 



A WALL AROUND CHINA 

Every friend of the Filipinos wishes to see their 
aspiration for Filipino independence fulfilled. It is 
true that we had hoped that the granting of independ- 
ence to them was motivated by the highest ideals instead 
of commercial and political expediency, but still, regard- 
less of the motivation procedure that end is in sight. 

Nothing would please world minded nations bor- 
dering the Pacific Ocean more than to find a Filipino 
nation properly managed, alert to opportunities, and 
capable of defending itself against military or com- 
mercial domination. That is our wish. It is also our 
concern to ascertain whether these requirements could 
be fulfilled. Admittedly the obstacles are tremendous. 

Should the Japanese dominate the Philippines — 
commercially or otherwise — China would be in a critical 
position. A Japanese archipelago extending from the 
Sakhalin Island through Taiwan to Luzon would prac- 
tically have the effect of turning China into a back 
inland country, completely cutting off all western trade 
and intercourse via the Pacific. 

We shudder to think of a made-in-Japan Monroe 
Doctrine fulfilled. Let us hope that the courageous 
Filipinos either achieve nationhood on a firm footing 
or retain the brotherhood of the United States. — CW.L. 



TRUTH AND KNOWLEDGE 
The Next Order of the Process of Man's Mind is 
to Attain to the Apprehension of a Particular Branch 
of Knowledge. In Every Particular Branch of Know- 
ledge There is Truth. Where There is Truth There 
is Substance. Where There is Substance, There is 
Reality. Where There is Reality There is Intelligence. 
Where There is Intelligence, There is Power. Where 
There is Power There is Influence. Where There is 
Influence, There is Creative Power. 

It is Only He Who Possesses Absolute Truth in 
the World Who can Create. 

Confucius. 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 9 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY 



China's Students and the 
Present Sino-J apanese 
Situation (Conclusion) 

Throughout last week the country's 
students, now numbering more than 
half of the nation's university and se- 
condary school pupils, continued their 
agitations without cessation. Being 
young, these students are easily moved, 
and the patriotic movement to demand 
government action against the autonomy 
move in North China had now become 
fully nation-wide and threatened to em- 
broil Nanking with Japan. 

As the days pass, these student de- 
monstrations increased in violence, defy- 
ing authorities and flouting the central 
government's threat of physical punish- 
ment and imprisonment for the student 
leaders. From Peiping to Canton the 
political tension produced by this move- 
ment mounted. 

Probably no two men in all China, not 
even the worried politicians of Nanking, 
watch with more concern and deep an- 
xiety the rumblings and manifestations 
of this new student movement, than Dr. 
Chang Mon-lin and Dr. Hu Shih, dean 
and professor respectively, of Peiping s 
National University. These two edu- 
cators, both of whom having been ac- 
tively engaged in the training of China's 
new youths for several decades, watch 
this impetuous, spontaneous revolt of 
the nation's students and ponder over 
its possible results. 

And well may these two eminent edu- 
cators ponder over this movement; for 
sixteen years before, when both of them 
already occupied the same positions they 
now hold in the National University, 
they had seen an older generation of 
students of the university lead the stu- 
dents of the nation in agitation against 
Japan's designs on Shantung province. 
They remember that on a fine May day 
in 1919, when China suddenly received 
news from Paris that the Peace Confer- 
ence had decided the Shantung question 
in favor of Japan, this older generation 
of students had risen as one body and, 
by the very force and spontaneity of 
their patriotic fervor, had turned the 
tide and retained Shantung for China. 

Both Dr. Chang and Dr. Hu had 
taken part in the 1919 student move- 
ment and had also indirectly aided and 
abetted the movement to realize its as- 
pirations. Now, sixteen years later, they 
see another generation of the university's 



students acting as leaders and promo- 
ters. As they watched this new move- 
ment, however, dismay was in their 
hearts — for the hopes of its success were 
precarious, for China's political situa- 
tion in 1935 had changed and the whole 
train of circumstances whi'ch precipita- 
ted this present movement were vastly 
different than those of 1919. Dr. Chang 
and Dr. Hu could not help but recall 
the situation of China in 1919, viz: 

The notorious Anfu Clique, a group 
of venal officials who were "more inter- 
ested in filling their pockets with Jap- 
anese yen than in protecting the public 
assets of China," were in power in 1919. 
This clique was headed by Tsao Ju-lin, 
then Minister of Communications. China 
at that time was at the mercy of Japan, 
but the island empire was restrained 
from the conquest of China by the post- 
war idealism of Europe and America. 
The inhuman massacres of humans 
in the world war were still fresh in the 
minds of the people of all nations and a 
Peace Conference was in session to set- 
tle the grievances of nations peacefully. 
Japan, though at that very time could 
have brought China under her thumb, 
was proceeding cautiously in her plans, 
taking infinite care not to outlaw herself 
in the eyes of the world by any overt 
action in respect to China. 

Although the country was literally be- 
ing sold to Japan by the Anfu clique, 
yet the student movement would not 
have manifested itself were it not for 
the fact that abruptly, on April 30, 1919, 
the Peace Conference awarded Shan- 
tung to Japan. 

The nation was stunned. But the 
people could not do anything; they were 
not politically conscious, were not organ- 
ized, and throughout the country there 
was nothing which resembled public 
opinion which could protest this unjust 
decision. 






8. 



a 



a 



T A O YUAN 

RESTAURANT 

• 

823 CLAY STREET 

Between Grant and Stockton 

Meals Unsurpassed in 
Chinatown 



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^f^ixr^s Qj^sr^a* <S£^Gr*zi£ <s" 



But there remained the students, the 
most politically conscious element of the 
populace, small in number but a poten- 
tial rallying force to stir public opinion. 
But what happened? As soon as the 
news reached China that Shantung had 
been awarded to Japan, the students 
immediately called a national anti-Jap- 
anese boycott, organizing the intelligent- 
sia and the business men. Taking the 
lead in this movement were the students 
of the National University. 

Wrote Dr. Chang Mon-lin at that 
time: "Even before the demonstration of 
May 4, some of the leaders in the new 
educational movement who had been ob- 
serving the spirit of unrest among the 
students, predicted that something was 
going to happen. The international po- 
licies in Paris supplied the fuel to the 
already burning desire of the students 
to strike." 

Events moved swiftly during those 
fateful May days. On May 3, a mass 
meeting of the students of Peking was 
called, at which 1000 of them attended. 
They agreed that the Shantung problem 
was caused by the corruption of their 
own pro-Japanese government and the 
injustice of the western nations. Stirred 
as never before by the critical condition 
of the country these students made plans 
to organize the people first, to depose 
the "traitors" who were then holding the 
powers of government, and second, to 
get word to the Chinese delegates in 
Paris and ask them not to sign the treaty 
of Versailles. The historic May 4 mass 
parade of students was arranged. 

On Sunday, May 4, 10,000 students 
paraded in the streets of Peking. Some- 
how they broke into the house of Tsao 
Ju-lin, considered the chief of the three 
pro-Japanese "traitors", demolished the 
entire place while Tsao and his two col- 
leagues fled to the Legation Quarter. 
Thirty-two students were arrested as a 
result of this demonstration. 

During the next two weeks actual war 
between the government and the students 
followed, the students employing the me- 
thods of printed propaganda, lectures, 
and strikes, while the government at- 
tempted to suppress them by arrests, 
whippings, and other measures of phy- 
sical violence. 

The students responded to govern- 
mental suppression with strikes through- 
out the country, for by that time the 
entire nation was aroused. They won 
the fight. The three pro-Japanese mini- 
continued on Page 16) 



Page 10 



CHINESE DICEST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



POSTURE CLINIC FOR 
CHILDREN 

What is characterized as the "round- 
shouldered" posture commonly found 
among Chinese children may be materi- 
ally improved by attendance at the pos- 
ture clinic conducted at the Chinese Y. 
W. C. A. The clinic is part of the Asso- 
ciation's health education program, and 
is under the supervision of Miss Aileen 
Perkins, assistant director of health edu- 
cation. 

School children between the ages of 
6 and 12 who are found, after examina- 
tion by the school physician, to have 
defective posture, are referred to this 
clinic. They meet on Tuesday afternoons 
from 3:00 to 4:00, where they are given 
posture exercises, to be practised daily 
at home. On Thursday afternoons, 
after school, they return to the 
Y. W. C. A. for check-up. An individual 
record is kept of each child, containing 
information regarding illnesses, nutri- 
tion, and health habits. On this record 
are also entered the type of special treat- 
ment necessary and a tabulation of pro- 
gress made. 

The project was started about two 
years ago by voluntary workers from the 
State Teachers' College. The enrollment 
has now reached a total of 37 children, 
with an average attendance of 22. Two 
voluntary workers assist Miss Perkins in 
giving individual attention. 

Defects and Underweight 

The most prevalent defects found 
in the posture of these children are flat 
feet, stooped shoulders, and sunken 
chests. The long hours at both American 
and Chinese evening schools, together 
with improper housing conditions are 
among the causal factors of this 
"fatigued" posture. Because these child- 
ren do not receive enough sunshine and 
fresh air, rest and recreation, it is diffi- 
cult for them to hold themselves erect. 

A majority of the children were found 
to be underweight. Since the standards 
of weight are based on the averages for 
white children, this condition may not 
have much significance with regard to 
posture, but it leads one to suspect that 
certain irregularities in posture, such as 
fallen arches, may be the racial charac- 
teristics of the Chinese anatomy. This 
possibility has been considered by Miss 
Perkins, who intends to make a careful 
study of these children in order to de- 
termine how far one may attribute these 
postural defects to differences in racial 
anatomical structure. 



RADIO TALK ON 
CHINATOWN 

To listeners of radio station KYA, 
a colorful glimpse of San Francisco's 
Chinatown was given recently in an 
interview of T. Y. Tang, executive 
secretary of the Chinese Y. M. C. A. 
The discussion ran the gamut from the 
Chinese Chamber of Commerce to a dish 
of chop suey, and gave a fairly repre- 
sentative picture of life in the Chinese 
community. 

As one of the five executive directors 
of the Chinese Chamber of Commerce, 
Mr. Tang described the origin and func- 
tions of that Chamber. Long before the 
western world had established trade and 
artisan guilds in the middle ages, China 
had formed guilds among its merchants. 
In 1908, the idea was transplanted to 
the Chinese settlement in San Francisco, 
in the founding of the Chinese Chamber 
of Commerce. Registered both with the 
State of California and with the Mini- 
stry of Industry in China, the organiza- 
tion has today as its primary mission the 
promotion of trade between the United 
States and China and the representation 
of Chinese commercial interests in all 
parts of the United States. 

In the 19th Century 

Tracing the history of Chinatown 
back to the 19th century, Mr. Tang 
told how China had its first contact with 
California in 1835, when Chinese goods 
were first shipped from Canton to the 
port of St. Francis, a decade prior to 
the discovery of gold in California. 
"Gold, of course, was the siren call 
which drew many Chinese settlers to this 
country. The beginning of our present 
day Chinatown dates back to those stir- 
ring times when men from all over the 
world came to these shores to seek for- 
tunes in the hills and mountains loaded 
with the precious golden metal." 

During the gold rush days, the Chi- 
nese population reached the peak of 
120,000. When the mines later became 
overloaded with laborers, many of the 
pioneer Chinese abandoned the search 
of eold either to return to their native 
land or to remain to develop the re- 
sources of the new land. "Then Con- 
gress extended a special invitation to the 
Chinese to come to add their labor to 
that of other workers in the construction 
of the transcontinental railroad. They 
placed the power of tb?ir muscles in the 
epic of steel, adding the necessary man 
power in the unifying of the new front- 



CHURCH CALENDAR 

The Chinese Christian Union Church 
will hold three New Year meetings on 
Jan. 3, 4, 5, each evening at 8:00 at the 
Chinese Cumberland Church, 855 Jack- 
son St. The speakers are respectively: 
David K. Lee, of the Chinese Methodist 
Church; Joseph Hsing Su, editor of the 
Chung Sai Chinese Daily; and Rev. Al- 
bert Lau, pastor of the Chinese Baptist 
Church. Election of new officers of the 
Union Church will take place following 
the first meeting. 

A New Year's Dinner, at the Far 
East Cafe, 631 Grant Ave., 6 p. m., Jan. 
4, will be open to all church members 
and friends at which occasion the new 
officers will be installed. Special musi- 
cal numbers have been arranged for 
these meetings. 

• • 
BREAKFAST GROUP MEETING 

The Chinese Christian Young People's 
Breakfast Group will meet again the first 
Sunday of the New Year, Jan. 5, at 
9 a. m. for breakfast and discussion. 

Miss Mabel B. Ellis, Y. W. C. A. 
secretary for work with women and girls 
of foreign background, will address the 
group concerning present day problems 
of second generation youth of various 
racial groups. Miss Ellis has done 15 
years of social study and research in 
New York and formerly worked with the 
Russell Sage Foundation. The Chinese 
community in New York was a matter 
of special interest to her, and the break- 
fast group will have an opportunity to 
compare their problems with those of 
their brothers and sisters in that East- 
ern metropolis. 

• • 

iers. When the last golden spike was 
driven, that type of work was closed to 
the Chinese, making it necessary for 
them to seek a new livelihood. Restaur- 
ants were opened .... and Chinese food- 
stuffs were imported from China." 
One for All 
Regarding the controversial subject of 
whether chop suey is a Chinese dish or 
not, Mr. Tang commented: "When Lcc 
Hung Chang, a special Chinese envov. 
returned a dinner party in honor of the 
president and other distinguished guests 
in Washington, D. C, he was requested 
to announce the names of the Chinese 
dishes, prepared by Chinese cooks 
brought over from China. Mr. Lee. .1 
clever diplomat, readily realizing tb.v 
(Continued on Page 15) 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 11 



FASHIONS 



CLARA CHAN 



THE CROWNING 
GLORY 

In. every country, in all ages, men have 
spoken of women's lovely tresses as the 
"crowning glory". In our own country, 
poets, minstrels and lyric writers have 
acclaimed the loveliness of the silky, 
smooth, ebony black hair of the Oriental 
beauties. In this day and age, young 
women of China are talking about free- 
dom from old restrictions, and are striv- 
ing for individualism, bemoaning the 
fact that they all have straight black 
tresses. How they envy those with 
soft curley hair of burnished gold, 
or chestnut brown, and yes, even of cop- 
per red. With the partial acceptance of 
Western modes and styles, Chinese wom- 
en forgot the praises sung by poets of 
the florid T'ang period and adopted 
whole-heartedly the Western coiffure. 
Seems to Me — 

I remember the time when the bob was 
first adopted by the school girls in 
China. Like their fathers who had 
stealthily cut off their cumbersome ques 
and thus evoked the anger of their ven- 
erable old mothers, these young ladies 
attending schools in the big cities, and 
learning of the freedom that the post 
war period brought to the American 
girls, secretly bobbed their neat braids. 
It is amusing to recall now, the panic 
that seized the girls when the holidays 
approached for them to return home. 
But now, the mothers, in turn, take up 
this fad after discovering the practicabil- 
ity of the short bob. 

When marcel waves came in, the 
Shanghai ladies flocked to the beauty 
shops and appeared at tea dances in 
tightly waved hair. At first it was big 
sister who enjoyed the privilege of a 
marcel, but with the innovation of per- 
manent wave-machines and with screen 
stars introducing new and different hair- 
dresses, the characteristic hair groom of 
the "foreign devils" is now highly fav- 
ored by all modern Chinese women. 
Your Bob and Mine — 

The popular current coiffure adopted 
by Chinese elegante in China is the long 
bob. With Chinese girls of this city, the 
hair dress made popular by Katherine 
Hepburn is favored. Dressing one's hair 
in this style or that, is really a matter of 
individual taste. Any hair dresser in 
town will willingly show you the type of 
coiffure that would be most becoming to 
your facial contour, and flattering to 
your personality and individuality, and 
will gladly show you illustrations of the 



KNITTING PREVIEW 

By Oy Lin Wong 

Everywhere you go you hear the click 
of knitting needles; and the conversation 
goes something like this, "I only started 
this suit two weeks ago and I have ten 
inches finished already." Really, knit- 
ting is no longer a problem. Every one 
is doing it and the lovely garments that 
are created are something to be proud of. 
Hand knitted garments have been and 
will still be very fashionable, and already 
many clever Chinese girls of the commu- 
nity are enthusiastic followers of this art. 

Even if you are a beginner, there are 
so many sources of information and help 
that you cannot afford to overlook the 
opportunity of knitting yourself a new 
spring outfit; either a suit or dress. 
Sport Suits — 

All of the shops are featuring knitted 
suits for Spring. Most of them are 
in light and medium light shades. Some 
of them have the typical plain skirt with 
a slip-on sweater. The neckline and 
the sleeve length vary. Then there is 
the tailored sport suit, either double 
breasted or plain. Your third choice is 
the three piece suit with either a cardi- 
gan top sweater or the three-quarter 
length coat. 
Cost is Small — 

The average person making a two 
piece suit will take from 17 to 20 balls 
of 1 oz. yarn. If you watch for yarn 
sales at the various stores your suit 
should not cost you more than three or 
four dollars. As I said before, there 
are many places to which one may go 
for instruction and information. One 
of these is a class given once a week by 
the knitting instructor of the Women 
City Club of Oakland. She has kindly 
consented to hold a knitting class in 
Chinatown for a small fee per person. 
For further details about this class or 

latest coiffure for afternoon or evening 
wear. But how very important it is to 
remember that our straight black hair, 
no matter if it is all nicely marcelled or 
curled in tight ringlets, is too often singed 
and coarsened simply because our hair 
is different from the blonde or brunette 
girl. 

If we must have wavy locks, which, of 
course, is more becoming, let them be 
waved but also let us strive to keep our 
tresses silky, shiny and ebony black as 
nature intended them to be, and we will 
still be called the dark-haired beauties of 
the East. 



any other classes please phone the Chi- 
nese Digest. 
Practical and Modish— 

Because San Francisco has become 
sport-minded one can. wear a knitted 
suit any place and still feel comfortable 
and perfectly at ease. What could be 
nicer for a Spring day than a hand- 
knitted skirt with or without a kick pleat, 
and a sweater to match? No coat to 
worry about and still quite warm enough 
for a day in sunshine or fog. The yarns 
for this coming season are found in 
lovely shades and new combinations. 

A friend of mine has just finished 
knitting a lovely oxford gray suit. A 
very plain skirt with a double breasted 
coat. One has to look closely to realize 
that it is not a tailored, but a hand knit- 
ted suit. Another that I saw was of the 
loveliest soft sage green. The skirt had 
a kick pleat in the front and a slip-on 
sweater to match. The joy one derives 
from this kind of a suit is that, for 
variation, one may wear a smart tailored 
blouse with it. Still another suit that I 
saw was really one of 'the smartest things 
I have seen this year. The skirt was a 
brown and tan mixture. Knitted very 
plain, the sweater was brown. Long 
sleeves and V neck, with white collar 
and cuffs of heavy linen. A brown 
suede belt added a distinguished touch 
to the entire outfit. 

So there really is no excuse for any 
one not having a good looking smart, 
new spring outfit this year. Pick out 
your favorite color yarn, select your 
pattern from an instruction book, ask 
for advice and aid from a knitting in- 
structor and you will be "rightly styled" 
this spring. 



MALKASON 

MOTOR COMPANY 

• 

OLDSMOBILE 

Mission Dealer 

See us before you buy 
your new Oldsmobile. 



"It will pay you well." 

2925 MISSION ST., NEAR 25TH 
San Francisco California 

VAlencia 7474 



Page 12 



CHINESE DICEST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



KUAN YIN, GODDESS OF MERCY 



By Dr. Henry H. Hart 

The Gods and Goddesses of China 
are innumerable. The earth, the waters 
under the earth and the heavens swarm 
with them. There are city gods, gods of 
the fields and of the trees and gods of 
every manifestation of nature, besides 
the many gods of the Taoists and of the 
Buddhists. 

But of all the gods and goddesses of 
old China the one who is loved more 
than all, yes, even more than the great 
Lord Buddha himself, is Kuan Yin, the 
Goddess of Mercy. She is the gentle soul 
who looks down upon the world of men 
and stretches forth her hand to bring 
peace to their sorrowing hearts and re- 
lief to their pain-tortured bodies. To 
her the Chinese turn in times of trouble, 
and at her shrines more prayers are 
chanted, more incense is burned and 
more sacrifices are gratefully offered 
than at the alters of all the other multi- 
tude of China's deities together. 
Strange Origin 

The story of this beloved goddess is 
one well worth telling, showing us as it 
does the gentler, kindlier side of the 
Chinese nature. 

She is a strange combination of two 
beings from different parts of Asia. Tra- 
dition tells us in the dim mists of China's 
past there was worshipped a Mother- 
Goddess, who presided over the hearth 
and earth, and who brought children to 
mothers who turned to her for help. We 
know but little of this goddess, except 
that the Chinese loved her and brought 
her prayers and sacrifices. 

Then came Buddhism, travelling the 
long road by land and sea from faraway 
India. In caravans and junks came the 
story and the gospel of the great Buddha 
to the people of the Middle Kingdom. 
And with the worship of the Enlightened 
One, the Hindu priests brought the cult 
of Avalokitesvara, the Buddhist God of 
Mercy. In some strange way which has 
never been explained, the Hindu God 
of Mercy became the Goddess of Mercy 
in China, probably because the attrib- 
utes of loving-kindness and gentleness of 
this deity of India were combined and 
confused -with those of the older Chinese 
Mother-Goddesses, and from that far- 
away day, nearly two thousand years 
ago, the Chinese have cherished and re- 
vered their kindly Kuan Yin. 

She Who Was Miao Shan 

The old Chinese legend of her life of 
purity and holiness, and of her service 
to suffering manhood through the ages 



is a beautiful one. 

In the reign of Ta Hao, of the Golden 
Heavenly Dynasty, there were born to 
P'o Chia, King of Hsing Lin, three 
daughters, the youngest of whom was 
named Miao Shan. Modest, beautiful, 
gentle and obedient, she was loved by 
all who knew her. When she had 
arrived at women's estate, and when the 
time was ripe for her to marry, she re- 
fused to accept a husband. She declared 
that she preferred to remain a virgin, 
to strive to attain perfection, and in the 
end to reach Buddhahood. 




Kuan Yin, Goddess of Mercy. 

( Photo from Nathan Bentz 

Collection.) 



This decision was contrary to all Chi- 
nese family tradition. All arguments 
and threats were in vain, and finally her 
enraged father drove her from his pal- 
ace. He forced her to live miserably in 
exile as a hermit, then later placed her 
in a nunnery, where she was treated as 
a slave. Her conduct there was so virtu- 
ous and self-sacrificing that the Lord of 
Heaven himself was touched by her 
grace and gentleness. He ordered the 
Spirit of the North Star and his angels 
to aid and watch over her. This act of 
the gods so infuriated the father that 
he ordered the nunnery and all its in- 
habitants to be burned to the ground. 



Miao Shan, the future Kuan Yin, seeing 
the flames, at once threw a drop of her 
holy blood into the sky. There it turned 
into a heavy rain, which forthwith de- 
scended and put out the fire. 

Immortal Kuan Yin 

Driven mad in his fury at his dis- 
obedient daughter, the King ordered her 
to be killed, and the executioner was 
summoned to behead the girl in a public 
square. As the headsman stepped for- 
ward to do his duty, suddenly the 
heavens were darkened, and the sunlight 
vanished from the face of the earth. The 
executioner struck at poor Miao Shan 
with his sword, but it broke in two. Then 
finally he strangled her with a silken 
cord. At the moment when her soul 
took its flight, a tiger leaped into the 
execution ground, seized her body and 
carried it off. Her soul, pure and un- 
sullied, was carried off on a cloud to 
the eighteen infernal regions of Yen 
Wang, the King of Hell. But at her 
appearance Hell was suddenly trans- 
formed into a paradise of joy, and even 
the instruments of torture were changed 
into fragrant lotus blossoms. The King 
of the Infernal Regions was greatly dis- 
turbed. There was no more pain or 
suffering, and all the condemned souls 
were divinely happy. So Yen Wang, 
to preserve his kingdom, sent her soul 
back over the Nai-Ho Chao (the bridge 
over the Chinese River Styx) and caused 
it to re-enter her body by his magic. 

Then the Buddha himself appeared 
in all his glory to the saindy maiden, 
and gave her a peach. "Take and eat 
of it," said the Lord of Heaven and 
Earth, "never more will you feel hunger 
or thirst. Old age and death are power- 
less against you, and you will live for- 
ever." Thereupon she was transported 
on a lotus blossom across the waters of 
the sea to the little island of P'u T'o, 
near Shanghai. This island is still the 
center of her worship today. She lived 
there for years, doing works of mercy 
and ever growing in purity and holiness. 
One day a guardian spirit arrived with 
a divine decree, proclaiming that she 
had attained perfection. He summoned 
her to depart and take her abode in the 
Nirvana of perfect peace, the soul of 
the Universe. 

Repose Renounced for Service 

Just as she was about to pass through 
the portals of Nirvana to take the rew.ird 
of her life of saintliness and good 
deeds, she heard the faraway cry of a 
human soul in agony, calling upon her 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 

SPORTS 



Page 13 



Fred George Woo 




The sports editor of the Chinese Di- 
gest will publish a picture of the winning 
basketball team of the Wah Ying Bay 
Region Tournament. 

• • 

Old Timers Try Comeback 

What promises to be a feature attrac- 
tion is the proposed basketball game be- 
tween the married and the single men of 
the Wah Ying Club, tentatively set for 
Jan. 26. It will be the preliminary tilt to 
the Wah Ying Tournament Winner vs. 
Rest of League contest, at French Court. 

After having been out of active parti- 
cipation in basketball for several years, 
and some not having played for more 
than a decade, it is going to be a rough 
trail for the married men. What an over- 
whelming trouncing they will probably 
receive from the singles, one can well 
imagine. 

Now my dear readers, don't think that 
up-to-date rules will be used in this game. 
The married men will most likely de- 
mand to use the rules that were used 
some ten years ago. And that means free 
for all and do what you please. Gosh, 
this is going to be funny, funnier than a 
donkey baseball contest. 

Here are some of the married men 
who will play (or attempt to) in that 
big game": James Jung, Edward 
Mock, Chan Foo, Daniel Yee, Frank 
Hee, George Lim, Herbert Lee George 
Ng, Fred Chin, and Harry Lum. 

• • 

Francis Hin Chin, of the Scout 
Seniors, is another Commerce Chinese 
boy who is out for basketball. Hin is 
trying for the Bulldog 130 pound squad. 

• • 

Out at Galileo, Johnny Wong and 
Stephen Leong are fighting for positions 
on the Lion thirties quintet. Steve is the 
regular guard of the Scout Senior team, 
while Johnny is a Nanwah player. 

• • 

Entries for the Northern California 
Y. M. C. A. Volley Ball Tournament will 
close on Jan. 8. It is reported that the 
Chinese Y. may be represented by a 
team. 



CHINESE SPORTSMEN ELECTION 

A new set of officers was elected by the 
Chinese Sportsmen Club on Dec. 28. Dr. 
K. Q. Fong was elected president, with 
Dr. D. K. Chang retained as vice-presi- 
dent. Frank Chan was chosen treasurer, 
and Clarence Chan re-elected secretary. 
Lee Yum is the new sergeant-at-arms. 
Directors of the club are as follows: 

B. K. Chan, Thomas Moran, Henry 
Guldbeck and Fred Jow. 

Sportsmen Club will hold its annual 
dinner this coming Monday evening, 
Jan. 6, at seven oclock, at the Sun Hung 
Heung Restaurant. It will be an inform- 
al affair. 

• • 
NULITE DEFEATS PALI 

For the second time this season, the 
Nulite A. C. won from the Paliclique 
Club of Palo Alto. Final score was 
15-12. Only half was played, as the 
court was not available for the second 
half. 

For the local team, Jue and Ho were 
the offensive leaders, while Gee and Le- 
ong were outstanding on defense. Won 
Loy Chan and Tan were the peninsula 
team's stars. 

• • 
RECREATION LEAGUE ENTRANT 

Arthur Hee's Shangtai basketball team 
last week entered the City Recreation 
Basketball League, Unlimited Division 

C, it was announced. Incidentally, 
Shangtai last week defeated the Poly- 
technic High School Varsity five. So 
■we are looking forward to the Shangtais' 
bringing home the Recreation bacon. 

• • 

SPORTORIAL 

So far this season at French Court, 
we have had two instances where fists 
flew in basketball games. Such happen- 
ings are deplored by Sportdom. It re- 
flects on the credit of athletics and the 
sportsmanship of the Chinese. 

Of course, we must realize that such 
things happen on an impulse of the 
moment. Ninety-nine out of a hundred 
cases, fists fly unconsciously and not with 
any intention or premeditation. It would 
be folly to blame it on either one team 
or one individual, as there are always 
two sides to every question. 

Let us be cool and calm from now on 
in all forms of sports. We must bear 
in mind that we should be gentlemen 
in the game as well as out of it. Re- 
member what the late Andy Smith of 
California said, "It's not winning the 
game that counts. It's how you play the 
game." 



THIS WEEK'S LEAGUE 
GAMES 

Local fans are looking forward to this 
week's Wah Ying League games with 
interest, as the strong Nulite A. C. bat- 
tles the top favorite, Shangtai. It will 
be a more interesting contest than the 
main event, which is between Troop 3 
Varsity and the Chi-Fornians. 

As the weeks pass by, the Nulite team, 
has been steadily improving and before 
the tournament ends, they may find 
themselves among the league leaders. At 
last week's games, Jue, Gee, and Leong 
established themselves as worthy candi- 
dates for the All-Star Teams. Shangtai 
must win Sunday's crucial game in order 
to enter next week's battle against the 
Scouts Varsity with a clean slate. 

Chi-Fornians have yet to register a 
victory this season. They may want the 
Scout Varsity as their victim, although 
that seems improbable. With such play- 
ers as Captain Earl Wong, Henry Kan, 
Don Lee, and Stephen Leong, the Scouts 
will rule as heavy favorites to overwhelm 
the Chi-Fornians. 

Possible starting line-up for the 
Shangtai-Nulite affair: 

Shangtai: Position: Nulite: 

Charlie Hing F. Wilfred Jue 

Fred Wong F. Howard Ho 

Gerald Leong C. Daniel Leong 

Ted Chin G. Herbert Louie 

Fred Gok G. Alfred Gee 

Last Week's Results 

Troop Three Varsity scored a 48-26 
win over their kid brothers, the Juniors, 
at French Court last Sunday in their 
league battle. Behind 22-21 at the end 
of the first half, the Varsity came back 
strong in the last half to overpower the 
Juniors. Led by Captain Earl Wong, 
who rang the hoop for a total of 23 
points, the Varsity won as it pleased. 
Fred Wong tallied eight points for the 
losers, with Ted Moy also turning in a 
fine performance. 

The second game ended with the Nu- 
lite's holding a 26-16 lead over the Chi- 
Fornians in the third quarter, with 
twelve minutes to play. Leland Stanford, 
referee, declared it "no contest", due to 
roughness. Jue and Gee starred for 
the Nulites, while Ted Lee and Look 
were Chi-Fornians' mainstays. 
• • 

Shangtai's basketball team lost a hard- 
fought contest to the Golden Gate Jun- 
ior College Varsity, 43-39. The Chinese 
team outfought and outplayed the colle- 
gians but were unable to outscore them. 



Page 14 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



Friends of Lim P. Lee will be surprised 
to learn that a baby shower was given to 
him by a small group of friends headed 
by Miss Margie Leung and Elsie Young. 
Friends were not half as surprised as 
"Limpy" was for he has neither wife nor 
baby (That is, as far as I know). 

• • 

Did you notice how generous Miss 
Virginia Quon was, much to her escort's 
enjoyment, at the skating party? Then 
you noticed how often she paused while 
skating to give her partner a great, big 
hug. Don't rush, boys. 

• • 

A certain Miss wanted an apology to 
her written in my column because she 
said that the girl mentioned as NB im- 
plied her. Well, here it is. If I meant 
you as NB, I apologize but, personally, 
why the guilty conscience? On the 
QT, did you say it wasn't Richard? Tell 
me more, we're interested, especially me. 

• • 

With his finger pointed at me, an 
officer of the Chinatown squad said, 
"You're the man we've been looking for. 
You went to Commerce Evening Hi, 
didn't you?" I meekly replied, "Yes," 
and wondered what I did or didn't do 
that the police should be after me? "Do 
you know this boy?" he said showing me 
a piece of paper. It seems this boy ne- 
glected to return some text books and 
here was I already with visions of the 
County Jail and another innocent man 
incarcerated. As Joe Penner would say 
"Don't ever do-o-o-o that!" 

• • 

One tiny tot, whose nickname sounds 
like a bell, was eating an ice cream cone, 
and like all other cones, this one began 
to drip at the bottom. When I pointed 
to the cone and said, "Look, leaking," 
the mother without much ado, trotted 
her child to 'the way of all flesh', before 
realizing that I meant the cone. 

• • 

This week, ALLEE, The TOWN- 
TROTTER, says: 

JOHNSON CHAN (Redwood City) 
and the petite FANNY MARK (Court- 
land) were married, it is reported, and 

have settled down in San Jose 

DAVID CHEW (Menlo Park) and 
LUELLA CHIN (Oakland) are also 
living in marital bliss .... HAROLD 
GEE and LILLIAN CHUNG "Shanghai 
Lil" announced their engagement last 
week .... EUGENE "Sinker" WONG 



KUAN YIN, GODDESS OF MERCY 

(Continued from Page 12) 
suffering humanity, to alleviate pain, to 
hearken to the sorrows of men, of wo- 
men, and of children, and gently to 
soothe and comfort them in their griefs 
and misfortunes in this vale of tears. 

Thenceforth was Miao Shan enshrined 
in the temples and homes and hearts of 
her beloved Chinese people. Gratefully, 
joyfully, they gave her the holy name of 
"Kuan Yin" — she who hears and an- 
swers the cry of the sufferer, the grief- 
stricken, the childless, and the forsaken. 

For the children of Han she is the 
idealization of womanhood, satisfying 
the universal craving for mother love. 

Her statue is found everywhere in 
China, and no village is too small to 
have a tiny shrine to the Goddess of 
Mercy. She is usually dressed in flowing 
garments, with a hood that makes her 
look not unlike the portraits of Queen 
Victoria. She has in the center of her 
forehead a third eye or jewel, an attrib- 
ute of those who have attained perfec- 
tion and Buddhahood. In her hand or 
at her side is a vase containing the dew 



and the Mrs. (former Irene Chan) and 
daughter will return to Seattle Satur- 
day .... Here's a lucky fella — HAR- 
OLD KOE won a radio and $3.00 in 
cash at the Knox Coffee Shop in a game 
of chance, (and wot chances you get!) 
.... Mr. Stork brought a baby daughter 
to Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE LOY. They 
named her BETTY JEANNE .... 
WALLY TONG made a New Year's 
Resolution not to tip his hat to any 
girl, cuz he caught a cold in his head 
the last time, (so 'scoose him, girls) .... 
Pretty Miss ALICE LUM, a newcomer 
from Hawaii, is now attending the Do- 
lores School of Beauty Culture .... 
IRENE CHUN, also from the 'Isle of 
Paradise' is another student there .... 
Did you know that three 'handsome 
chaps' posted a notice on the Y. W. 
bulletin board asking 'certain' fair-maid- 
ens to sign up for a party? (Well, well, 
wot a treat!) .... BENNY LIGH lives 
in a 'beeg' town, Castella California. It 
has a population of TEN! .... TOM- 
MY BOW (Bow-Kow) and a certain 
'Miss Yee' were seen 'going places' to- 
gether. (Ah, young love in bloom) .... 
PAUL YOUNG is now in San Rafael 
hashing up things for the gals of the 
Dominican Convent .... Here's a girl 
who can take it — JESSIE FUNG took 
many an awful spill at the Chitena 
Skating party and yet came back for 
more .... SO LONG! 



or waters of mercy, with which she gently 
moistens the eyelids of the sufferer and 
brings him peace of mind and repose 
of body. In her arms she often cradles 
a tiny babe, not her own, as in repre- 
sentations of the Virgin Mary, but a gift 
which she bestows on childless mothers 
who sincerely pray to her for aid. 

We often find her with a thousand 
eyes and a thousand hands, indicating 
that she can answer a thousand prayers 
at once. It is also a reminder to man 
that he should ever have a thousand 
eyes with which to seek out the places 
where his charity is needed, and a thou- 
sand hands with which to lavishly 
bestow loving-kindness upon his fellow 
men in distress. 

Kuan Yin is often modelled in beauti- 
ful porcelain, usually in pure white, for 
one of her best loved names is Pai I 
Shih, — The Great Teacher Robed in 
White. 

No Saintlier Woman 
"The men love her, the children adore 
her, and the women chant her prayers." 
She brings sons to anxious fathers. She 
is the patron saint of storm-tossed sail- 
ors. Where most of the other Gods are 
feared, she is loved. Her face is as 
radiant as gold and as gentle as the 
moonbeam. If you mention her name 
in the midst of fire, the flames cannot 
burn; if tossed on the great storm-waves, 
call upon her and the tempest will be 
stilled. In battle her name makes weap- 
ons powerless. If thoughts of evil be- 
siege you, she is at your side to purify 
your heart. Thoughts of her will 'dispel 
anger. She is the most beautiful being 
in the universe, and to compare a girl 
to Kuan Yin is to pay the highest com- 
pliment to her grace and loveliness. 
Chanting her praise and repeating her 
name brings endless merit. She can 
change her shape and visit throughout 
the world as she pleases, ever bent on 
errands of relief and mercy. 

So we leave the gentle Kuan Yin. 
Though only a legend to us, she is a 
beautiful reality to the Chinese, and her 
presence in the shrine of home and heart 
has made the Chinese a better, gentler, 
kindlier people. No religion has ever 
conceived of a saintlier woman, a more 
beautiful soul, or a personality more 
filled with that love which is divinity, 
for relief. Whereupon, she renounced 
her well-earned eternal repose, and de- 
clared that for all ages to come she 
would devote herself to the relief of 
• • 

A son was born on Dec. 19 to the wife 
of Park Quoy Chew, 160 Waverly Place. 
San Francisco. 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 15 



RADIO TALK 

(Continued from Page 10) 

was not easy to explain these complicated 
Chinese dishes, included them all under 
one name, 'chop suey', which means a 
little of everything." 

Bazaars and Laundries 

Many business enterprises peculiarly 
typical of the Chinese in America origin- 
ated in these colonial days on the Pacific 
Coast. Among them are the art goods 
bazaars and the laundries. The former 
grew out of the introduction of small 
Chinese curios and art trinkets to San 
Francisco housewives by Chinese farmers 
who peddled their farm produce from 
door to door. The subsequent demand 
for Chinese art goods for home decora- 
tion and for gifts led to the opening of 
bazaars in all Chinese communities. 

The scarcity of women and the lack of 
leisure time, during the latter part of 
the 19th century, caused the pioneer 
settlers to send their clothing to Hawaii 
to be laundered and returned to the 
mainland. "Naturally the prices were 
exorbitant and the Chinese by learning 
to wield the iron were able to reduce 
laundry prices for San Franciscans and 
thus to establish a new business for 
themselves." 

Chinatown today is not only a unique 
spot for the satisfaction of occidental 
curiosity, but it is a compact community 
seething with life and activity. It has an 
intricate system of community organi- 
zations, a conglomeration of business 
enterprises. It is an interesting example 
of the blending of Eastern and Western 
culture. It has a well-equipped hospital, 
a half million dollar investment; several 
newspapers, all in direct cable service 
with China; nine Chinese schools, where 
ancient culture supplements the Ameri- 
can schools; Chinese branches of the Y. 
M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., and the Na- 
tive Sons Association; besides a score of 
other welfare and religious organizations. 

• • 

WONGS HOLD ELECTION IN L. A. 

Results of the election held by the 
Wong Family Association of Los An- 
geles last week were announced. The 
new officers, who assume office Jan. 1 are: 
Wong Sai Sin, president; Wong Wing 
Chi and Wong Tin Shang English se- 
cretaries; and Wong Chu Chin, Chinese 
secretary. 

The Chinese Congregational Young 
Peoples Group held its December meet- 
ing and social gathering last Saturday 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. S- Fong. 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Wilson (San Francisco) 
Jan. 7; President Hoover (San Fran- 
cisco) Jan. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Feb. 4; President Taft (San 
Francisco) Feb. 12; President Cleve- 
land (San Francisco) Mar. 3; Presi- 
dent Hoover (San Francisco) Mar. 11; 
President Taft (San Francisco) Mar. 31; 
President Coolidge (San Francisco) 
Apr. 8. 

SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Van Buren (San Francisco) 
Jan. 3; President Garfield (San Fran- 
cisco) Jan. 17; President Hoover (San 
Francisco) Jan. 24; President Polk 
(San Francisco) Jan. 31; President 
Taft (San Francisco) Feb. 7; President 
Adams (San Francisco) Feb. 14; Presi- 
dent Coolidge (San Francisco) Feb. 21; 
President Harrison (San Francisco) 
Feb. 28. 

CHINA'S FOREIGN RELATIONS 

(Continued from Page 7) 

ture. At the same time we should seek 
harmonious international relations a- 
mong nations provided there is no vio- 
lation of our sovereignty. We should 
seek economic co-operation based upon 
the principle of equality and reciprocity. 
Otherwise, we should abide by the de- 
cision of the Party and the Nation and 
reach a resolute determination. As far 
as I am concerned, I will not evade my 
responsibility. We shall not forsake 
peace until there is no hope for peace. 
We shall not talk lightly of sacrifice until 
we are driven to the last extremity which 
makes sacrifice inevitable. The sacrifice 
of an individual is insignificant, but the 
sacrifice of a nation is a mighty thing, 
for the life of an individual is finite 
while the life of a nation is infinite. 
Granted a limit to conditions for peace 
and a determination to make the su- 
preme sacrifice, we should exert our 
best efforts to preserve peace with the 
determination to make the final sacrifice 
in order to consolidate and regenerate 
our nation. I believe this is the basic 
policy of our party for the salvation 
and upbuilding of our nation. 



A son was born on Dec. 26 to the wife 
of Wong K. Pong, 717 Sacramento St., 
San Francisco. 



"QUEENIE" SAILS FOR CHINA 

Last Friday the SS President Coolidge 
carried away from the society of San 
Francisco Chinatown a most eligible 
young man, Quong Hong Lee, popularly 
known as "Queenie". "Queenie" re- 
turned to San Francisco in 1933 after 
four years of study at Illinois University, 
where he graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in railway engin- 
eering. 

He had planned to return to China 
at the time, but stayed to serve as chair- 
man of the Kong Chow Benevolent Asso- 
ciation for two years. 

• • 

CHINESE INVENTIONS 

(Continued from Page 6) 

also failed, and war became the order 

of the day. 

The border state of Ts'in, half Chi- 
nese and half Tartar, finally became the 
most powerful, and soon a single empire 
was established (Ts'in Dynasty, B. C. 
256-206). From the word Ts'in we re- 
ceive the name China (Chinese Digest, 
Vol. 1, No. 2). This was a short-lived 
dynasty however, and soon a pure Chi- 
nese state emerged (Han Dynasty, B. C. 
206 - A. D. 220). The Han rulers gave 
China four centuries of commercial and 
political expansion, and to this day the 
Chinese proudly call themselves "Men 
of Han" (Han jin) . Since the Ts'in- 
Han Period, the nobility was abolished, 
the only hereditary titles being those for 
members of the royal family. All offi- 
cials from the premier down were chosen 
on the basis of ability from then on. 
The dukeship awarded descendants of 
Confucius is a purely honorary one. 

We may also note here that since B. C. 
281 the Chinese have observed inter- 
national laws of an advanced nature, 
for example, exchange of ambassadors, 
treaty making, protection of political re- 
fugees, and the principle of extradition. 
According to Dr. E. T. Williams, Pro- 
fessor Emeritus of the Oriental Depart- 
ment, University of California, the Chi- 
nese had a clearer conception of sover- 
eign rights on territory than the West 
up to as late as 1800 A. D. 

(Next Week: The Chinese Were the 
First to Play Football. 

• • 

STOCKTON WONGS ELECTION 

Results of the election held by the 
Wong Family Association of Stockton 
last week were announced. The officers 
are: president, Wong Yin Chang; Chi- 
nese secretary, Wong Hay Poy; and 
English secretary, Wong Wing Quon. 



Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 3, 1936 



CHINA'S ADOPTION OF MODERN AERIAL COMMUNICATION 



By Henry J. Poy 
(Mackay Radio and Telegraph Co.) 

Prior to 1929, the international tele- 
graph system of China was, for forty 
odd years, operated exclusively by for- 
eign cable companies. Such a condition 
meant INTER ALIA a big financial loss 
to the Chinese Government and was most 
regrettable. 

Ever since 1927 the problem of having 
a system of international radio com- 
munication had been foremost before 
the Chinese Government. The first re- 
cord of a plan of such nature was found 
in the resolutions of the forty-sixth 



meeting of the Branch Political Coun- 
of Kwantung. Though this plan was 
transmitted to the Central Political Coun- 
cil at Nanking, it did not materialize 
until the following years. 

By February 1929, purchases were 
made by the Government for hi-speed 
automatic sending and receiving wire- 
less apparatus. Among these were two 
20-40 kilowatt directive-beam transmitt- 
ers, four 2 kilowatt transmitters, and one 
15 kilowatt directive station. Traffic 
agreements were signed with foreign 
countries for direct wireless circuits with 
Manila, San Franciso, Berlin, and Paris. 




In August, 1929, the Ministry of Com- 
munications acquired large tracts of land 
at Fonglinchiao, Liuhong, and Chenju 
near the city of Shanghai. Here, roads, 
bridges and houses were built in order 
to install these powerful machines. By 
March 1930, the despatching station 
building for the four Telefunken trans- 
mitters was completed at Fonglinchiao 
and by November 1930, the receiving 
station building at Liuhong was ready 
for operation and the grand opening of 
the transmitting stations at Chenju took 
place on December 6, 1930 for direct 
radio communications with Europe and 
the United States. The expenditure of 
this gigantic radio central, known as the 
Chinese Government Radio Administra- 
tion, was #407,000 (U. S. currency) for 
the machinery, and #540,000 (Chinese 
currency) for buildings, land and con- 
struction. This is one of the great con- 
struction projects of China. 

Although the net work of the C. G. 
R. A. consisted of 11 direct interna- 
tional radio circuits, such as San Fran- 
cisco, Berlin, Paris, London Java etc, 
yet through these channels all telegraph 
offices throughout the world are easily 
reached. 

Due to the special importance of Lon- 
don in the relation between China and 
Great Britain it had been considered ne- 
cessary to have a Shanghai-London di- 
rect radio circuit, and through the Board 
of Trustees for the Administration of 
British Indemnity Fund, purchases of 
two 20-kilowatt complete beam trans- 
mitters were made from Marconi of 
London. 

(Continued next week.) 



CHINA'S STUDENTS AND SINO- 
JAPANESE SITUATION 

(Continued from Page 9) 

sters were forced to resign, the cabinet 
was altered, and the delegates in Paris 
refused to sign the Treaty of Versailles. 
The student movement ended in com- 
plete triumph! 

But what of today? Will the student 
movement againt this new method of 
Japanese invasion meet with the same 
result attained in 1919? 

Viewing the situation according to 
the lights of world politics to-day, it is 
highly questionable whether the students 
wil even win the right of freedom of 
speech, to consider one of the major 
points which they demand of the pre- 
sent national government. China in 



1935 has a central authority which pos- 
sesses enough power to quell and sup- 
press any indigenous movement which 
it considers harmful to national welfare 
and to Sino-Japanese goodwill. 

On the other hand, Japan to-day is 
politically too strongly entrenched in 
Chinese soil to let a handful of students 
block, even temporarily, the develop- 
ment of its Asiatic expansion program. 
Japan in 1919 was cautious; in 1935 it 
was bold. 

As to Europe and America, post-war 
idealism in diplomacy has seemingly 
been wiped off the face of the earth. Anti- 
war pacts and treaties guaranteeing the 
territorial and administrative integrity 
of China have been thrown overboard, 
replaced once more by nationalism and 
economic self-interest. With world poli- 



tics in such conditions, therefore, what 
hope remains for China of Western aid in 
her hour of crisis? 

Yet, this present student movement is 
not at all hopeless, for out of it China 
may be awakened once again to the dan- 
ger of further Japanese aggression which 
it now faces. Military resistance against 
Japan at this moment is out of the gues- 
tion, but perhaps the central government 
may, as a result of the students* agita- 
tions, put up a stirrer diplomatic resis- 
ance to Japanese demands. At all events, 
this new student movement will have 
stirred up an articulate opinion which 
the government cannot afford to ignore. 
References 

The quotations in the above article 
are taken from "The Youth Movement 
in China" by Tsi C. Wang. 




CUIN£S£ 

Oi S £ S T 




. We\VS - SPO&TS - SOCIAL - COMMENT 
OA WEEKLY PUfeUCMlOS - - - - SfrM ffttftMClSCOJCfrUf ORfeHftU 



Vol. 2, No. 2 



January 10, 1936 



Five Cents 



fljjg NEWS ABOUT CHINA §|^ 



By Tsu Pan 

• Train Robbery in Demilitarized Zone 

• Greetings and Protests 

• Demonstrations and Sympathy 

• Feng Reappointed 



After exchanging the season's greetings and wishing 
each other a happy and prosperous New Year, Gen- 
eral Sung Cheh-Yuan and General Kenjo Doihara sat 
down at a conference table in Kalgan to figure out ways 
and means of settling the impending problems of Cha- 
har. Before they had hardly warmed their seats, 
flashes from Eastern Chahar reported that the "Man- 
chukuoan" troops under Lee Shu-sing had taken five 
districts there including Kuyuan and Paochang. Sub- 
sequent dispatches rushed from other places in North 
China immediately forced the leaders at the confer- 
ence to lodge protests against each other which entirely 
nullified the felicitous atmosphere. 

To wit: The Japanese protested that the Chinese 
soldiers had grossly insulted Japan when on the night 
of January 5, they opened fire on a contingent of 
Nipponese soldiers as the latter wanted to enter the 
city gate of Chaoyangmen, Peiping. The Chinese also 
protested that the Japanese troops had committed 
similar affront on China when on January 6, over sixty 
Japanese soldiers arrived at Tangku, taking down Chi- 
nese flags at a public building and hoisting the Japanese 
rising sun in its place. Both demanded an apology 
and punishment of the offender. 

According to observers — although incidents at Pei- 
ping and Tangku are readily accessible to adjustment, 
it will be some time before the Chinese and the Japan- 
ese can come to terms on the confronting problems of 
Chahar. 



A north bound express train was held up by three 
robbers near Peitaiho on the Peiping Liaoning Railway 
on the night of January 3. Nine persons were injured 
including one Japanese police guard and two Japanese 
civilians. The robbery took place in the North China 
Demilitarized Zone, where, according to Tangku 
Agreements, the Japanese army is given the task of 
policing. 



Banditry and Chinese mal-administration were the 
unfailing excuses the Japanese had advanced to justify 
their actions in Manchuria. After the eventful night 
of September 18, 1931, Japan had forcefully seized 
Manchuria from China and set up the puppet state of 
"Manchukuo". With the administration of "Manchu- 
kuo" virtually in the hands of the Japanese for a period 
of over four years, frequent reports are still being 
heard about bandits and irregulars waging guerilla 
warfare with the Japanese forces. The present robbery 
case has special political significance, besides the pro- 
perty lost and persons injured. The Japanese had, by 
Tangku Agreements, forced China to "demilitarize" 
and allow the Japanese Kwantung Army to police an 
area which is strictly Chinese territory. The world can 
easily judge who is more capable of protecting life 
and property, as train robberies had never happened 
on the line previously. 

Student demonstrations in all parts of China seemed 
to have gained so much momentum of late that Gen- 
eral Chiang Kai-shek planned to call a conference of 
student delegates at Nanking to explain his foreign 
policies. Instead of coming to the conference, the 
Peiping students shunned China's No. 1 man and went 
into the country to stir up patriotism among the pea- 
santry. Hundreds of young students marched in the 
winter blizzards in an attempt to awaken the uncon- 
cerned Chinese farmers to patriotic actions. 

Sympathetic with the students was General Hsu Fan- 
ting, chief of general staff of Nanking's first army. 
Mourning over the North China situation, General Hsu 
went before the mausoleum of late Dr. Sun Yat-sen 
in the Purple Mountain, Nanking, to bury a knife in 
his abdomen. He was gravely wounded but did not die. 
He is the first known soldier to perform hari-kari dur- 
ing the Sino-Japanese embroglio. 

General Feng Yu-Hsiang, the "Christian General" 
of China, came out of retirement January 6 to accept 
the vice-ministership of the Military Affairs Commis- 
sion of the Nanking Government, a post second only 
to that of General Chiang Kai-shek. Observers viewed 
this move as an effort by the Chinese government to 
check any "sell-out" to Japan in North China, as Gen- 
erals Sung Cheh-yuan and Han Fu-Chu are followers 
of Feng. 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 10, 1936 



FAR EAST 



Shanghai's New Tourist 
Service 

Shanghai — A new kind of profession 
has sprung up here for young women of 
personable appearances and fair educa- 
tion which promises to give added im- 
petuous to the tourist sightseeing trade 
here. Chinese women are being hired 
as guides and shopping companions for 
English speaking tourists who flock here 
by the thousands every month to see the 
Paris of the Orient. 

A travel service bureau is responsible 
for this innovation in street guides. Only 
young girls with at least middle school 
education and knowledge of elementary 
English are employed. Newly employed 
workers are given a short course in spo- 
ken English which is highly necessary 
for the work they are to do. The lessons 
are given each morning at eight o'clock 
and at nine o'clock their work begins. 
These women guides are on call from 
nine o'clock in the morning until mid- 
night and are paid seventy-five cents 
Mex. an hour, which is equivalent to 
twenty-five cents in U. S. currency. 

In addition to acting as travel guides 
these women also act as shopping com- 
panions and interpreters for foreign 
tourists who wish to buy souvenirs or 
other articles from native stores. 



Dr. T. C. Lin, who was a professor at 
the University of California from 1929 
to 1934, is teaching political science at 
the University of Nankai at Tientsin, 
China, and also edits the "Nankai Social 
and Economic Journal". His wife, 
Bertha, a graduate of U. C. teaches 
English at Nankai University. 

• • 

CHINESE GEOLOGIST DIES 

G. K. Ting, famous Chinese geologist, 
died on Jan. 6 in Changsa, China, from 
pneumonia, following an attack of car- 
bon monoxide poison, suffered during an 
inspection tour of coal mines in Hunan 
Province. 



Engineers Needed in China A Propaganda Boomerang 



HOWARD MAGEE 

COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 



EXbrook 0298 
Anglo Bank Bldg. 



Son Francisco 
830 Market St. 



Chinese student engineers in America, 
specializing in iron and steel smelting, 
are needed for a new government manu- 
facturing plant which will be opened 
this spring near Shanghai. This an- 
nouncement came recently from the 
ministry of Industry through the Chi- 
nese Embassy in Washington D. C. 

The government will open a Central 
Machine Works in Chenju, a short dis- 
tance from Shanghai, which will cover 
100 mow of land and cost #3,000,000 
to erect. The money will come from 
the Sino-British Fund. The Central Ma- 
chine Works will start with the manu- 
facturing of mains and water tubes 

Chinese engineering students now 
studying here, whether government or 
private, are invited to apply for open- 
ings in this new government project. 
Qualifications are that they must be of 
good character, and willing to work 
hard. Applicants are requested to give 
precise information regarding their edu- 
cation, academic degrees, and actual ex- 
perience in America. 

Applications are to be sent to the 
Chinese Embassy at Washington D. C. 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Coods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MINC CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 

PAUL ELDER b CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 
Magazine a.id Papers 
681 Jackson Street 



Peiping — When the so-called North 
autonomy movement was in the stage of 
being hatched some weeks ago and 
threatened the already strained relations 
between Nanking and Tokyo, with each 
side accusing the other of bad faith and 
downright political misbehavior, a little 
incident occurred here which quite em- 
barrassed the Japanese militarists. 

A Chinese policeman saw a young civ- 
ilian soap-box orator making a speech 
in grandiloquent Chinese in support of 
autonomy in the public park. He was 
arrested, taken to the police station and 
given a flogging for being a traitor to 
his country. As the flogging became 
too excruciatingly painful, the prisoner 
cried out that he was not a Chinese but 
a Japanese. The Chinese police refused 
to believe he was a Japanese because he 
spoke Chinese so well, and flogged him 
some more for his unpatriotic behavior. 
However, his protests finally raised 
doubts in the minds of the police. A 
phone call to the Japanese barracks 
brought a Japanese to the station, who 
identified the prisoner as a Japanese 
sergeant. 

The situation was highly embarrassing. 
The Japanese army heads could not ad- 
mit that one of its men had been carry- 
ing on insidious propaganda for auton- 
omy. The Chinese police was non-com- 
mittal. It was finally decided to hush 
up this little propaganda boomerang. 
The Chinese police agreed to drop all 
charges. 

• • 

AVIATION STUDENTS: CONTACT! 

The Shanghai Aviation Association is 
anxious to contact Chinese students of 
aviation in America. Mayor Wu Te- 
chen of Shanghai is the honorary chair- 
man of this aeronautical organization. 

• • 

Reports that the steamer Watachau 
had foundered on Dec. 22 were confirm- 
ed last week with the discovery of float- 
ing wreckage. The vessel, bound from 
Shuitung to Kongmoon, foundered with 
200 passengers and crew aboard. Over- 
loading caused the ship to capsize, it 
was presumed by authorities. 

• • 

An educational film will be shown 
through the courtesy of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company U the audi- 
torium of the Chung Wah Middle 
School, Friday, Jan. 10, from 7 to 8 p. m. 
The public is cordially invited. 



January 10, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



CHINATOWNIA 



Page 3 



Waku Auxiliary 

From now until Saturday, Jan. 
25, one may observe the superb 
salesmanship exerted by the Waku Aux- 
iliary of Oakland, as this organization 
of Oakland girls will hold its annual 
dance at the C. A. C. A. hall in San 
Francisco on that evening. 

As an added inducement to a well 
known orchestra, souvenirs for girls will 
be given away at the door. An enjoy- 
able evening is assured everyone — for 
the Auxiliary boasts of a large member- 
ship. Ducats may be secured at fifty 
cents per copy from members. 

The Auxiliary elected the following 
new officers at its final meeting in 
December: Emmy Lee, president; Eva 
Jue, vice-president; Edna Wong, treas- 
urer; and Mable Wong, secretary. 

• • 

TROOP 11, B. S. A. INAUGURATION 
On Sunday evening, January 5, 1936, 
a new Boy Scout troop, Troop 11, was 
inaugurated in the Chinese M. E. 
Church. 

Invocation was given by Wong Hong, 
and opening remarks by the chairman, 
David K. Lee. The Assistant Scout Ex- 
ecutive, and Field Executive, J. Thomas 
MacFadden, and Mr. Pearson, respec- 
tively, were introduced. Mr. MacFadden 
came in the absence of Raymond O. 
Hanson, Scout Executive. Mr. Pearson 
presented Mr. Reisinger, District Com- 
missioner, who delivered a scout message. 
Committeemen Edwin Owyang, and Roy 
S. Tom spoke about the value of scout- 
ing. Albert Park Li, Assistant Scout- 
Master, presented the new troop which 
gave the Scout Oath and the Laws. Mr. 
MacFadden presented membership certi- 
ficates and awarded the badges. 

Refreshments were served in the social 
room by the Epworth League members 
to the gathering of 150, which included 
all members of Troop 34. Other scouts 
present were from Troops 3, 4, and 63, 
and greetings were received from Troop 
45 of Oakland. 

• • 
MANDARIN CLASS IN L. A. 

General Ting Hsui' Tu's class of 30 
odd students in the study of the Man- 
darin language has been conducted very 
successfully thus far. The general be- 
lieves that the easiest way to learn a 
language is to learn to sing it. This is 
a unique and interesting feature. 

Classes are held every Thursday eve- 
ning at 8 p. m. at the Chinese Congre- 
gational Church. Mimeographed lessons 
are distributed weekly for each class. 



Student Wins 
Shriner Contest 

"I like my art class in school the best, 
and I want to grow up to be an artist 
like my uncle," Jerry OwYoung, 13- 
year-old winner of the recent annual 
Shriner East-West game poster contest, 
told the Chinese Digest reporter in an 
intimate interview a few days ago. 

The contest, participated in by all Jun- 
ior high schools, was held the latter part 
of December, 1935, under the auspices of 
the Citizens' Committee and was directed 
by Aaron Artman, director of art in the 
city schools. The winning poster was 
reproduced by the Committee to promote 
interest in the New Year's Day game at 
the Kezar Stadium. 

Jerry is enrolled in the low eighth 
grade at the Francisco Junior High 
School. As a small child, he would, 
during the summer vacation, accompany 
his uncle, Hon Chew Hed, well-known 
Chinese artist, on his early morning out- 




Henry Ow Young 

door excursions to observe him in his 
painting. He would take along his own 
scrap book and would sit patiently by 
his uncle's side, trying to produce his 
own "art pieces". It was through this 
early experience that the boy's native 
talent found early expression. The un- 
cle is reported to be directing an artists' 
club in Honolulu, and has several paint- 
ings on display at the DeYoung Museum. 
Friends and relatives are happy to 
hear of Jerry's achievement, and he is 
kept busy answering requests for copies 
of his poster. He is sending copies to 
various parts of the United States, to 



"Y" BOYS ACTIVITIES 

The Tiger Club of the Chinese Y. M. 
C. A. won the Decathlon Championship 
of Class A, while the Blue Eagles cap- 
tured first place in the Class B Basketball 
Tournament. 

In the Decathlon Ping Pong Tourna- 
ment, the Friendly Indians of the Tiger 
Club, under the leadership of Frank 
Fong, took top honors. Its basketeers 
also went through an undefeated season. 

The Bulldog Club took second place 
in the Ping Pong Tourney, with Norman 
Ong doing well in his matches. 

Under the instruction of Leland 
Crichton and Frank Wong, the "Y" 
Tumbling Team is learning its drill and 
stunts with willingness and enthusiasm. 

• • 

Miss Young of "China Seas". 

The charming Chinese actress who 
played a feature part with Clark Gable 
and Jean Harlow in "China Seas", Miss 
Soo Young, recently related one of her 
childhood incidents to Richard Wah Ong. 

It happened many years ago when she 
was a child in Hawaii. At that particu- 
lar time, an airplane was something to 
marvel at. So one day when a plane 
was about to land in the islands, there 
was much commotion. In fact, the peo- 
ple attached so much importance to the 
event that the landing field was spaced 
off and an admission price was charged 
to see the plane land. Because she was 
one of many children in the family and 
her mother couldn't afford to take all 
of them, Miss Young was left at home, 
much to her disappointment. 

Being on a Sunday, she sadly wended 
her way to Sunday School. Her Sunday 
School teacher was about to leave when 
she arrived. Greeting her with a puz- 
zled look the teacher asked, "Why, Ah 
Hee, what are you doing here? Don't 
you know that everybody is at the land- 
ing field? You can see — " she waved 
her hand around the empty room. Then 
Miss Young wistfully looked up at her 
and almost in a whisper said, " I know, 
my reverend teacher, but God and my 
Church come first." 



Honolulu, and back to "the old folks" 
in China. 

Jerry had a good time watching the 
game from the 50-yard line, as he was 
rewarded four tickets as winner of the 
contest. He stated that he would have 
enjoyed "the whole affair" if it were 
not for the fact that his hand is still 
hurting him from too much handshaking. 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 10, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



New Hospital Board 

An election of the Chinese Hospital 
Board was held last week. The Board of 
Directors for this year, one member from 
each Chinese Association, will be com- 
posed of the following members: 

Chinese Six Companies, Chan Mun 
Dip; Ning Yung Association, Wong 
Kuey Ging; Kong Chow Association, 
Chan Gin Din; Young Wo Association, 
Ow Wing Fook; Sil Hing Association, 
Fong Mun Ping; Sam Yip Association, 
Hall Kuai Chuen; Hop Wo Association, 
Ong Check Fine; Yan Wo Association, 
Chan Gun Jeung. Chinese Chamber of 
Commerce, Louie Gar Yee; Chinese Na- 
tionalist Party, Jow Gum Chew; Chee 
Kung Masonic Association, Sum Sil 
Chong; Hing Jing Tang Association, 
Fung Kin Chau; N. S. G. S., Yan Chun; 
Chinese Presbyterian Church, Chan Bok 
Choy; and Y. M. C. A., Chan Bok Jing. 

From the members of the Board, offi- 
cers were selected. They are: president, 
Chan Gin Din; vice-president, Louie 
Gar Yee; Chinese secretary, Chan Bok 
Choy; English secretary, Chan Mun 
Dip; treasurer, Wong Guey Ging and 
Yan Chun; and superintendent, Ginn P. 
Louie , re-elected. Chairman of the in- 
stallation, which took place Jan. 2, was 
Chan Suey Nin, member of last year's 
board of directors. 

• • 

Pasadena, Calif. — Among the most 
beautiful of the seventy-one floral floats 
which were entered in Pasadena's 47th 
annual Tournament of Roses held re- 
cently was one which portrayed the life 
of Yang Kwei Fei, China's loveliest wo- 
man. This float was made up of 
200,000 blooms, many thousands being 
wreathed into floral dragons. This float 
was Long Beach's entry, and constituted 
a pageant in itself. 

• • 



Oakland Students' 
Annual 

The Chi U's (Chinese Youths), an 
organization composed of Chinese stu- 
dents of the Oakland High School, held 
their first annual dinner at the See Hoy 
Low in Oakland last week. 

The affair was well attended by mem- 
bers and their friends. California and 
Stanford students were on the guest list. 
A number of the club'c talented members 
rendered piano and vocal numbers. 

This event climaxed the term's work. 
Decorations were carried out in the New 
Year theme, which was particularly effec- 
tive. Following a snappy after-dinner 
program, the rest of the program was 
devoted to dancing. 

Officers of the Chi U's for the cur- 
rent term include: Howard Jan, presi- 
dent; Jane Fong, vice-president; Jennie 
Wong, secretary; Bruce Quan, treasurer; 
and Jean Moon, social chairman. 

• • 
WAR FEARED 

Indianapolis, Ind. — That the Orient 
is faced with grave threats of war was the 
declaration in an address by Dr. T. Z. 
Koo, one of the leaders at the Quadrien- 
nial Student Volunteer Movement Con- 
vention. Students from all parts of the 
world met here from Dec. 28 to Jan. 1 
for discussions, forum and international 
fellowship. 

• •' 

The Chinese Young People's Break- 
fast Group ushered in 1936 with a New 
Year's Eve party at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ira Lee. The affair was planned 
by Howard Seto, and a buffet supper was 
served by Albert G. Lew. 

• • 

A son was born on Dec. 28 to the wife 
of Chan Chew Sing, 1042 Washington 
St., San Francisco. 



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CHITENA DANCE COMMITTEES 

Chitena has announced the following 
committee chairmen for their Chinese 
New Year's Dance at the N. S. G. S 
Auditorium, Jan. 24: reception, Dr. 
Theodore C. Lee; publicity, Fred Mah; 
ticket and tallies, M. F. Wong; refresh- 
ments, Woodrow Ong; prizes and favors, 
Gladys Chinn; gate,Joe Moke and An- 
drew Tseng; posters, Wahso Chan, Paul 
Mark and M. F. Wong: decorations. 
Wahso Chan; sergeant-at-arms, John 
Tseng. 

H. K. Wong is chairman of the dance. 

• • 
AUTO ACCIDENT 

Edward G. Low, 18, of 49 J 31st Ave. 
San Mateo, lost control of his car while 
driving down Washington street toward 
Grant Avenue last Friday evening, and 
smashed into the rear end of the grocery 
truck of Sang Wo Company. In turn, 
the truck was hurled against a hydrant 
causing considerable damage. No one 
was injured. 

• • 

Chicago Chinese Protest Japan 
Chicago, 111. — The Chinese citizens 
of Chicago, 1,000 strong, demonstrated 
in a protest against Japanese policies 
toward China last Sunday in Chinatown. 
Placards carried by the demonstrators 
termed Japan as "Public Enemy No. 1." 
The demonstration was sponsored by the 
North America Chinese Students' Asso- 
ciation and other Chinese organizations. 

• • 

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January 10, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 5 



TEA AND LANTERNS 



TOMS' ANNUAL NEW YEAR PARTY 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Tom had their 
fourth annual new year's eve party at 
their home on Clay Street. The guests 
played cards and mah Jong till nearly 
midnight, then prepared for refreshments. 
And at the stroke of the gong signifying 
the new year the refreshments were serv- 
ed as is the custom each year. Those 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Lee, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hall Nom, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Jung, Mr. and Mrs. George Quock, 
Mr. Jung Chung, Chingwah Lee, and 
Robert G. Poon. 

• • 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL SOCIETY 
IN CHINATOWN 

In the fall of 193 2, a Chinese branch 
conference of the St. Vincent de Paul 
Society called the conference of Our 
Lady of China, was established in the 
community to carry on charity and re- 
lief work among its more unfortunate 
inhabitants who have not been taken 
care of through other channels of public 
or private welfare societies. 

This conference made a special visit 
on Christmas day to the Chinese inmates 
of the Laguna Honda Home. On this 
visit Chinese foodstuffs and Chinese 
newspapers were distributed among them. 
Because the members of the Conference 
make regular monthly visits to the Home 
the Chinese there always look forward 
to their coming, as it serves to break the 
monotony of institutional life. On the 
same day the members also visited the 
Chinese patients at the S. F. County 
Hospital. 

• • 

Engagement Announced 

Harold Gee and Lillian Chung an- 
nounced their engagement at a New 
Year's Party at the Lido Cafe recently. 
The party included Helen Ong, Ruby 
Young, Alice Chin, Harry Chan, Walter 
Gee, and Charlie Ong. 



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HERBERT WONG HOST 

Dancing to the music of nationally 
famous orchestras, (through the medium 
of the radio) the guests of Herbert C. 
Wong whiled away the time. It was an 
In-Between Party, as the host explained, 
"It is 'In- Between' Xmas and New Year." 

During the early part of the evening 
the guests amused themselves playing 
bridge, mah Jong, and pig. Dancing 
began immediately after sandwiches and 
punch were served. 

Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. 
George Young, Misses Alice M. Chew, 
Jessie Fung, Helen Ho, Flora Chan, 
Ruth Young, Lily P. Tong, Elaine Tong, 
Pauline Tong, Edna King, Grace Lee, 
Helen Loy, Grace J. Wong, Gladys 
Chinn, Doris Lowe, Mamie Hing, Mar- 
ion Lee, Margaret L oo, May Wong. 
Messers. James Tong, William Jow, Joe 
H. Poon, Henry Lem, Joe Lai, Henry 
Soon, Harold Jee, Herbert Louie, An- 
drew Wong, Thomas Wu, Fred Ng, Ches- 
ter W. Look, George Chang, Willie Gin 
Gee, Jickee Lee, Wallace Mark, James 
Lee, Arthur Eng, William Young, and 
Andrew Quock. 

• • 

SPORTSMEN'S ANNUAL DINNER 

Chinese Sportsmen's Club's third an- 
nual installation dinner was held last 
Monday, Jan. 6, with about eighty mem- 
bers and friends present. Master of 
ceremonies was B. F. Lowe. Speeches 
were made by B. K. Chan, past president; 
Dr. D. K. Chang, newly-elected presi- 
dent; Hal Remington of the Chamber of 
Commerce; Walter J. Hanna of the Gol- 
den Gate Gun Club; J. P. Cuenin, sports 
writer of the San Francisco Examiner; 
and Tod Powell of the Chronicle. 

In three years of its existence, this or- 
ganization has progressed so steadily 
that,' to-day, it is one of the most well- 
known sportsmen's clubs on the Pacific 
Coast. 

• • 

TROOP THREE "B" REUNION 

Troop Three "B" Division's Reunion 
Dinner was held Sunday, Jan. 5, with 
36 persons present. Among them were 
ChingWah Lee, scoutmaster. Roy S. 
Tom, Ernest Loo, Ben Yip, and Henry 
S. Leong, officers. 

Edwin Owyang was chairman of the 
committee in charge, with Henry Owyang 
and Teddy Lee as committeemen. 

• • 

A son was born on Dec. 20 to the wife 
of Kim Sing Choy, 773 Sacramento St., 
San Francisco. 



Y. W. C A. SPEAKER 

On Jan. 13, Miss Lillian Hodgehead 
of the San Francisco Conservatory of 
Music will give an illustrated talk about 
her recent trip to Europe, at 8 p. m. at 
the Y. W. C. A. 

• • 

VISITORS IN LOS ANGELES 

Betty Won visited Los Angeles for the 
first time last week, and was the house 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Y. C. Hong. She 
attended the dance given by the Celestial 
Club on Dec. 31. Among other out-of 
towners who were present at this function 
were Elsie Yip, Lily Yip, Eva Lowe, and 
Caroline Lim. 

George "Prince" Wong of San Luis 
Obispo is leaving this week for New 
York, after fulfilling an engagement with 
a Salinas orchestra. "Prince" has another 
engagement scheduled for later in the 
season, at the Miami Biltmore Hotel at 
Coral Gables, Florida. 



Sightseeing Notes 

(A) EQUIPMENT 

Once Upon A Time: 

Any person owning a taxi could 
start an International Sightseeing 
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was necessary. 




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Page 6 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 10, 1936 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



Chinese Discoveries and Inventions Remember When? 



(VI) The Chinese Were the First to 
Play Football. 

Until the days of the Republic, sports 
and athletics played a very minor part 
in the daily life of the Chinese. The 
determination of the ruling Manchus to 
stamp out uprisings had led to the sup- 
pression of all forms of massed physical 
activity. The severe struggle for exist- 
ence doubtlessly also played a very im- 
portant part. 

It is true that we have boat and foot 
races, archery, fencing, acrobatics, feath- 
er kicking, mu kung fu and wrestling, 
cricket fighting, hikes, and kiteflying, but 
none of them ever reached the dimen- 
sion of the modern "big games". The 
only possible exception is that of cricket 
fighting, but here, the insects did all the 
exertion. 

However, before the days of the Man- 
chus, and especially during the T'ang 
and Yuan Dynasties, Chinese life was 
associated with a great deal of outdoor 
activities. Some of the delightful mor- 
tuary art pieces recovered from tombs 
of the T'ang Dynasty were pottery ladies 
dancing or doing tricks on horseback. 
Others were playing on the lute or crash- 
ing cymbals. The expression on their 
faces show a carefree, almost child-like 
contentment, and their bodies are Gre- 
cian rather than Parisian. 

A popular game at that period was 
the kicking of footballs (t'i pi chiu). 
The ball was of leather, but stuffed in 
the manner of the modern baseball. We 
do not know how the game was played, 
except that it was probably like the game 
of shuttlecock on a large scale. Players 
are divided into two teams which form 
half circles facing each other. The 
game was received with a great deal of 
enthusiasm in Japan. 

During the Chou Dynasty the Chinese 
played a game called ch'i (Cantonese, 
kei), and this survived under the name 
of wei ch'i. An Indian form, called 
Hsiang ch'i (elephant chess), entered 
China during the Han Dynasty, and the 
two probably blended, resulting in the 
modern form of Chinese chess. Kuan 
Yu, a warrior of the period of the Three 
Kingdoms was said to have played chess 
while undergoing an operation on his 
arm. 

Chariot races occurred at a very early 
date, and many Han Dynasty stone tab- 
lets or bas reliefs depict cavalry and 
chariots in speedy motion. The racing 



Remember when there used to be an 
altar in the back part of almost every 
shop in Chinatown? Remember how 
the most venerable or senior member of 
the firm would religiously "offer incense" 
(ts'ong heung) before the altar every 
morning and before dinner? 

The altar was always a simple one, 
dedicated either to the Earth God (t'u 
ri shen) or to the God of Prosperity 
(choy shen), and represented by a writ- 
ten inscription. In front of the altar 
would be the usual incense urn, candle- 
sticks, and the three cups of tea. On. 
important occasions, there would be add- 
ed three thimbles of wine, flowers, fruit, 
and even food. 

Most of these picturesque altars dis- 
appeared by 1911, the revolutionists hav- 
ing accused the gods as being old fash- 
ioned and pro-Monarchists. The only 
business places still have altars to-day 
are the theater (dedicated to Ming 
Huang) , a lantern shop, and one ob- 
scure poultry shop. 

Do you know of any more? 
(The above is the FIRST of a series 
of 52 recordings of sociological and cul- 
tural changes taking place in Chinatown 
within a generation. Send in your 
observations.) 



of dragon shaped boats (pa lung sh'uan) 
is said to have its origin in the third cen- 
tury before Christ when a part-v of boat- 
rno-n searched the river for a Ch'u Yuan, 
an official who preferred to commit sui- 
cide rather than obey the evil orders of 
his Emperor. This performance was re- 
flated each year on the anniversary of 
his death, resulting in the modern boat 
races. 

According to Hun Tsun-hsu, a writer 
of the Sun? Dynasty, backgammon ori- 
ginated in India and entered the King- 
dom of Wei (northern China) during 
'hp D»riod of the Three Kingdoms (A. 
D. 220-265). 

Shortly before the T'ang Dynasty, polo 
(Chinese, pu lu) spread from India to 
China and Persia, and in all three coun- 
tries appeared to be the favorite game 
of the royalties. International polo 
matches took place during the T'ang 
Dynasty, and one delightful painting, 
sa-'d to be pre-Ming, showed Chinese 
r^ffl'-ials playing with grsto. 

Next Week: The Chinese Invented 
All the Chief Varieties of Paper. 



CERAMIC ART 

(VII) How Spurs or Props are 
Arranged. 

The modern kiln is about the size of 
a room, and the bungs or piled saggers, 
which is typically the shape of hat boxes, 
resemble columns, placed close together, 
but not touching each other. The sim- 
pler kilns have improvised shelves of fire- 
clay, resting on pillars also of fire clay. 
The simplest kilns merely fire their wares 
in stacks. 

During the Sung Dynasty we find all 
three methods employed, depending on 
the quality of the wares. The best, such 
as most chien and kuan wares, are fired 
in saggers. The coarse wares are fired 
in stacks. In between, we have jars and 
vessels fired on improvised clay shelves. 

Importance of Position 

Studying the various positions of the 
spurs on the vessels is also of great im- 
portance. Some of the earliest Han 
wares were apparently fired in a scatter- 
ing of potsherd. At least the spurs are 
irregularly located varying in shape, sire, 
and number. Some of these spurs stick 
beyond the edge of the base, no effort 
having been made to grind them away. 
Undoubtedly they were made for burial 
only, for even a short period of usage 
would have worn away these rough pro- 
jections. Today collectors take special 
precaution to guard these "teeth" from 
breakage. 

The finer Han wares have spurs placed 
close to the edge of the base, each spur 
generally pointing toward the center and 
at equal distances from each other. 
Typically only three spurs are use — the 
minimum number required to keep the 
base on an even plane. It is obvious 
that the accidental breaking of one of 
the three supports would upset the firing 
position. 

Methods 

Three methods were employed as pre- 
cautions. In a few cases, large heavy 
props were used. This is especially true 
of the earlier Han wares, and some of 
the larger Han jars have adhesion of 
spurs which are nearly a quarter of an 
inch wide, and about an inch in length. 
More often the number is increased 
from three to five, seven or more. Still 
another method is to place an additional 
spur alongside each of the three, re- 
sulting in paired arrangement. One Ming 
flower pot. for example, has a set of 
three pairs of spur marks. The spurs 
(Continued on Page 14) 



January 10, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 7 



China's Adoption of 
Modern Aerial 
Communication 

By Henry J. Poy 
(Conclusion) 

At the same time, a China-Great Britain 
radio agreement with the Imperial and 
International Communications, Limited, 
of London, were signed. These new 
beam transmitters together with a new 
power house and a complete system of 
underground cables connecting stations 
at Liuhong and Chenju with the Chinese 
Central Traffic Office at Shanghai, were 
all completed at the end of 1933. 
The First Step 
The Chinese Central Traffic Office at 
Shanghai has a highly-trained comple- 
ment of skilled radio operators, entirely 
Chinese, numbering 110. Their require- 
ments to attain these positions are high, 
and before they are considered, they 
must pass a stiff competitive examination. 
It was on May 18, 1933, that negotia- 
tions between the Chinese Government 
and the Mackay Radio 8C Telegraph 
Company, of the United States, were 
brought to a successful conclusion, and 
a direct radio circuit inaugurated be- 
tween Shanghai and San Francisco.. 
Messages were exchanged between offic- 
ials of the Chinese Government and the 
Consul General of China in San Fran- 
cisco, and officials of the Mackay Radio 
& Telegraph Company. 

Modern Equipment 
Seventy-six skilled operators are em- 
ployed in the San Francisco office and 
operate high speed automatic circuits 
with Shanghai, Tokio, Honolulu, and 
Manila, and domestic circuits to New 
York, Chicago, Seattle, Portland and 
Los Angeles 24 hours per day. An aver- 
age of 6000 radio messages daily are 
handled in this office. All Mackay cir- 
cuits are automatically operated by the 
latest high-speed tape transmitters and 
syphon recording receivers, which make 
a permanent record of all messages. The 
transmitting equipment for the circuits 
operated from San Francisco is located 
at Palo Alto, California, and is con- 
nected by control wires from the San 
Francisco operating center. The auto- 
matic devices in San Francisco operate 
relays in the transmitting station in Palo 
Alto, which in turn operate the radio 
transmitters. Messages go out on the 
air at Palo Alto in the form of high- 
speed continental Morse signals, as the 
sending tape is passed through the auto- 
matic devices in San Francisco. Speeds 



as high as 200 words per minute are em- 
ployed in automatic transmissions. Auto- 
matic recorders are necessary to record 
messages at high speeds. The automatic 
operations also minimize the possibility 
of errors, as the human element is re- 
moved to a great extent. The most mod- 
ern methods of noise filtering, elimina- 
tion of atmospheric disturbances and 
amplifying of signals are used. Dupli- 
cate equipment units are available to be 
put into service without loss of time 
when required. The operating room is 
connected by a system of pneumatic 
tubes with the delivery, private wire and 
branch offices to facilitate rapid hand- 
ling. Electric time clock stamps are 
used to record the time each message 
is received in the operating room, and 
the time it is transmitted. The operat- 
ing department is divided into three di- 
visions: coastwise, transcontinental and 
transpacific, with supervisors for each 
division, all under the general supervi- 
sion of the traffic manager. 

Mackay Radio's Chinatown branch of- 
fice in San Francisco, which is associated 
with the Postal Telegraph Co., is man- 
aged by Thomas Leong. Its office is 
connected with the main radio central 
by modern teletype installation. Only a 
few minutes elapse between the time the 
radiogram is filed in Chinatown to the 
time the radiogram is received in Shang- 
hai radio-central by the direct Mackay- 
Shanghai wireless circuit, thus bringing 
to the very door steps of San Francisco 
Chinatown the benefits of modern wire- 
less communication. 



CANTON LOW 

CHOP SUEY AND NOODLES 
Tray Service at All Hours 

LUNCHEON AND DINNER 

708 GRANT AVE. CHina 0780 

San Francisco California 



GIRL SCOUTS TROOP 14 

At the first meeting of the Girl Scouts 
Troop 14, for the new year, the following 
officers were elected: troop scribe, Es- 
ther Quock; troop treasurer, Ruth Chinn; 
Evergreen Patrol leader, Lucille Lee; 
assistant patrol leader, Grace Fong; 
Rippling Brook Patrol leader, Bertha 
Jann, assistant patrol leader, Haw Chan. 

The next event will be a ceremony of 
awards, at which time the following 
scouts will be awarded: Patrol leader 
badges for 1935; Anita Lee and Carolyn 
Chong. Gold star badges for 100 per 
cent attendance: Pansy Chan, Grace Fong, 
Alice Chew, Nora Lee, Ruth Chinn, Lu- 
cille Lee, Carolyn Chong, and Esther 
Quock. Silver star badges for 90 per 
cent attendance : Anita Lee. 

The ceremony will be conducted by 
scout captain Anita Lum. 

• • 

Hip Wo Chinese School opened its 
new term on Jan. 6, with classes at the 
Presbyterian Church and the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. As usual, English 
Classes will be given at the Chinese Con- 
gregational Church. 

• • 
HEALD STUDENTS ELECT 

The Associated Students of Heald Col- 
lege recently held its election at the Chi- 
nese Radio Club. The new officers are: 
president, David Shew; vice-president, 
Charlie Wong; secretary, Lai Sin Yee; 
assistant secretary, Daniel Huey; trea- 
surer, Norman Lee; assistant treasurer, 
Thomas Lee. 

• • 

At the Chinese Baptist Church, stu- 
dents returned to their classrooms on 
Jan. 4. All old and new students were 
registered last week. 

• • 

The Chinese Agricultural Association 
of Los Angeles elected its Board of Di- 
rectors for 1936. Those elected were: 
Jow Hay, Woo Kuey Chong, Quon Foon 
Lit, Fong Yee Som, Jew Sing Kuai, Chan 
Yu Kai and Chan How. 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Sir: Enclosed find # for 

period of The Chinese Digest. 

Name - — 

Address 

City .State 



Page 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 10, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, #2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, #2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 

STAFF 



CHING WAH LEE 



.Associate Editor 



WILLIAM HOY Associate Editor 

FRED GEORGE WOO Sports 

CLARA CHAN Fashions 

ETHEL LUM Community Welfare 

ROBERT G. POON Circulation 

GEORGE CHOW Advertising 



PATRIOTISM IN CHINA 

(Reprinted from San Francisco Chronicle) 
Japanese attribute the student riots in China to 
"foreign supported" or mission colleges. 

Even if this were true, it would merely mean that 
patriotism, which is a new virtue in China, is a natural 
product of modern education, in China as everywhere 
else. One learns patriotism, for instance, also in Jap- 
anese universities. In Japan, obviously, it is a virtue. 
The Japanese militarists regard it as a fault only when 
it develops in China. 

However, here is one example with which foreign, 
or missionary support has nothing to do. 

The most purely Chinese university in China has 
long been Nankai University, at Tientsin. Chang Po- 
lin, its President, was a Chinese naval officer, but, after 
the first Sino-Japanese war, concluded that the future 
of China lay in education and not in arms. So he re- 
signed and started a school in a friend's house in Tien- 
tsin. That school has since grown into a major univer- 
sity, all under Chinese leadership and by Chinese sup- 
port. Until the emergency caused by the depression, 
Chang had never even received monetary contributions 
from abroad, and even now these have been only a 
minor and temporary factor. In conception, in admini- 
stration, in money and in scholarship and instruction, 
the institution has been purely Chinese. 

But now, sacrificing plant and investment in Tientsin, 
Chang Po-lin is transferring his whole university to 
the far western province of Szechuan. He prefers 
even the disturbed conditions there, and the disadvan- 
tages of remoteness and isolation, to the conditions 
that would be imposed by Japanese domination in 
Tientsin. He can at least educate free scholars in 
Szechuan, and train Chinese youth to be Chinese 
patriots. 

Advancing in age, and not in good health, Chang 
Po-lin, one of the finest men in China, is only carrying 
out a lifetime record of courage. The one thing Chang 
Po-lin has never done is to be afraid of anybody or 
anything. Out of his new nucleus may come, after he 
is dead, the seed of a new China. He will have his 
reward. 



FROM ANTI TO PRO, SINCE WHEN? 

Recently, in the San Francisco Monitor, Brother 
Leo, California's famed educator and critic, had occa- 
sion to review Professor Ira B. Cross's recently pub- 
lished book called "A History of the Labor Movement 
in California." In the course of the review Brother 
Leo made this significant remark: 

"The high place of the book .... is Dr. Cross's 
treatment of the sand lot agitations, Dennis Kearney 
and the slogan, 'The Chinese must go.' So completely 
and radically has popular opinion veered from anti 
to pro in the Chinese situation that the present genera- 
tion of citizens — unless they have long memories or 
talkative grandparents — know little of the animus 
directed against the Chinese in the late seventies and 
early eighties. That is a singularly interesting chapter 
in California history." 

It seems to us that the middle sentence of the above 
paragraph needs a few words of qualification. If, by 
that particular remark, Brother Leo means that the 
feelings of California's citizens, as a whole, toward the 
Chinese, as a whole, has changed from an attitude of 
hostility to genuine friendship since the end of the last 
century, then he is certainly right. On that score, no 
point of dispute could be raised. 

However, if Brother Leo means by that statement 
that the attitude of labor toward the Chinese has "com- 
pletely and radically .... veered from anti to pro" 
since the 1880's in the state, then we beg the liberty 
of differing with him. On this point, he has been mis- 
informed. 

Writers on the labor movement in California for the 
past several decades have assumed that, because there 
are no more wholesale persecutions, campaigns, and 
vociferous public utterances directed against the Chi- 
nese to-day, labor has taken them to its bosom and has 
given them the equal opportunities granted to other 
immigrant races to seek their livelihood in the economic 
scheme of things. 

If that were only true. But, unfortunately for the 
Chinese, it is not. California labor is still anti-Chinese, 
but its tactics to-day have changed. 

In the general labor market to-day, many employers 
are specifically told that they must not hire Chinese 
workers because they do not belong to the union. And 
when some Chinese laborers seek admittance into the 
union their applications are refused. When will the 
labor movement come out of its shell of animosity and 
extend a hand of friendship to these peaceful, law- 
abiding and industrious people and give them fair and 



equal opportunities: 



W. H. 



January 10, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 9 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY 



Rising Industrialism 
In China 

"For 18 years I have been opposed to 
the penetration of China by Japan. I 
now make an about face and declare it 
my honest conviction that the sooner 
Japan conquers the whole of China, the 
sooner will China regain her freedom and 
become an asset to civilization instead of 
a liability 

The words quoted above were not writ- 
ten by any Chinese general or politician 
with pro-Japanese leanings; nor did they 
come from the lips of some fire-breath- 
ing Japanese militarist. They were 
penned by an American free lance jour- 
nalist, Sydney Greenbie, who has lived 
many years in China, and from his obser- 
vations of present-day China he has writ- 
ten many articles regarding that coun- 
trys current affairs for American con- 
sumption. The paragraph quoted is from 
Mr. Greenbie's article, "Japan's Imperial 
Boomerang" in a recent issue of the 
Christian Science Monitor. 

Developing Industrially 

The process by which Mr. Greenbie 
has reached his present conclusion anent 
the destiny of China, he attributes to 
the fact that China, in spite of chaotic 
political conditions, its unstable currency 
problem, its invasion by Japan, and its 
disunity, is slowly but with a tenacious 
purpose developing industrially. And 
the writer believed that it is being done 
by Japan without her being aware of it. 
"The era of bewilderment (on the part 
of China) being somewhat on the wane, 
the further Japan goes in laying rail- 
roads, developing resources, the more 
certain is the growth of China to be . . . 
Japan is . . . still too young an indus- 
trial power to see whither her expansion 
is leading . . ." 

There is little doubt in the writer's 
mind that China is industrially follow- 
ing, and without any halting either, in 
the footsteps of western nations. "She is 
rearing a mechanized structure no out- 
side power will be able to control." 

Yet, how is rising Chinese industrial- 
ism frustrating and nullifying Japan's 
aim to gain political and economic 
domination of the country? Above all 
markets Japan needs the tremendous 
Chinese market to absorb her growing 
volume of export goods. But, year after 
year, the Chinese are buying less from 
Japan because the need for some of her 
manufacturers which have hitherto been 

Patronize Our 



solely supplied by Japan are now being 
made at home. 

Home Products Supplanting Imports 

Mr. Greenbie gave numerous examples 
to show how Japannmade goods are now 
being supplanted by native made prod- 
ucts. Calcium carbonate supplies, but- 
tons made from fruit stones, and towel- 
ing machines, which formerly all came 
from Japan, are rapidly being displaced 
by home made products. A rubber 
manufacture plant was started in China 
18 years ago, but failed. Then the Jap- 
anese organized one, but also failed. To- 
day, however, the largest rubber manu- 
facture concern is Chinese owned. 

Three years ago, Japanese leather 
goods dominated the Chinese market; 
today, native competition is driving the 
former out. Soaps, toilet articles, sta- 
tionery goods, are being made at home. 
Parasols, which Japan could make and 
sell cheaper in China than the latter's 
own make in former years, are now being 
supplanted by even cheaper native 
products. 

Among other native made goods which 
are displacing Japanese commodities on 
the home market are: glass plate, glass- 
ware, tooth powder, gourmet powder, 
crockeries, wash basins, cups, bowls, etc. 
Fifteen years ago Japan exported more 
than $3,000,000 worth of wash basins, 
bowls and allied articles to China; today, 
the amount is no longer a large item in 
Japan's export to that country. 

"Supplies for enamelware originally 
came from Japan," said the writer, "and 
factories were established by Japanese. 
Subsequently, Chinese, after working for 
the Japanese, established their own fac- 
tory." 



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Textile Mills 

In the extensive textile industry, which 
up to several years ago, was almost en- 
tirely in the hands of foreign, mostly 
Japanese, companies. Besides having 
their own companies, now, the Chinese 
are making the machines themselves for 
the manufacture of cotton goods. In the 
face of special protection accorded for- 
eign mills under treaty stipulations, dur- 
ing the past decade 16 native mills have 
come into being in Shanghai, 35 in 
Kingsu province, and 84 in other parts 
of the country. The Japanese have 41 
mills, and the British, three. But "even 
the foreign mills were being manned by 
Chinese. . . . While the Chinese cottons 
are inferior, they are cheaper and more 
acceptable to the native market." 

Industrialism As A Challenge 

All these evidences of China's rising 
industrialism Mr. Greenbie declared to 
be "tendencies inherent in postwar indus- 
trial expansion" and that "As the Japan- 
ese supplant the European, so the Chi- 
nese will supplant the Japanese market." 
When the Chinese people refused to buy 
Japanese goods whenever Japan rattled 
her swords and threatened the country 
with more loss of territory, it was "not 
mere boycotting Japan objected to. It was 
industrialization that was supplanting 
Japan that infuriated her." 

The writer believes that China will be 
able to stand up and free her shackles of 
Japanese domination in the not very dis- 
tant future. Mr. Greenbie fully concedes 
(although he did not develop this point) 
the fact that Japan is fearful of the rising 
of Chinese industrialism and is bending 
every effort to prevent her from any 
further growth; and wherever it is not 
possible to do so, then to gain control of 
such enterprises. The writer is more 
fearful of Japan's future than of China's 
as he has plenty of hopes for the latter, 
a viewpoint which, supposedly, more 
trained observers like Nathaniel Peffer 
(author of China: the Collapse of a Civ- 
ilization) should do well to adopt. 

Indeed, Mr. Greenbie is almost positive 
that China will be the winner in her pres- 
ent industrial tussle with Japan. "She 
(China) is no India and no Ethiopia. 
She is basically an industrious, business 
folk with her feet on the earth and a 
racial fluency that is as divisible as water, 
but able to float any vessel whether of 
cargo or of guns." 

Which is tantamount to saying that, 
come what may, the Chinese can "take it." 



Advertisers — They Help to Mak_e This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Page 10 



CHINESE DICEST 



January 10, 1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



THE W. P. A. AND 
CHINATOWN 

Interested observers of the relief situ- 
ation in Chinatown will wish to know 
what changes the new Works Progress 
Administration program has wrought in 
the community. As early as October, 
1935, Chinese cases have been trans- 
ferred from the relief rolls to the work 
program. Today the situation may briefly 
be stated as follows: Out of the approxi- 
mate 500 "single" men formerly depend- 
ent on direct relief from the State Relief 
Administration, 331 are now working on 
W.P.A. projects; of the approximate 
350 families, 164 have one member em- 
ployed on W.P.A. work. All of these 
people, with but a few exceptions, are 
working at the lowest occupational level, 
unskilled labor, at #60 a month for 120 
hours of work. 

Comparative Figures 
Only one member out of each family 
household, no matter how large, can 
be certified for full time W.P.A. work. 
Furthermore, W.P.A. workers are in- 
eligible for supplementary relief from 
the State Relief Administration, whether 
it be cash, medical service, surplus cloth- 
ing or food commodities. The amount 
of income from W.P.A. work as com- 
pared with the amount of relief previous- 
ly granted may be seen from the follow- 
ing figures: 

Total number of families on W.P.A. 
164. Total earnings on W.P.A., #9,840 
(@ #60 per month). Total W.P.A. earn- 
ings plus average outside income, #10,- 
878.12 (average outside income #6.33 
per month). Total income while on di- 
rect relief #11,444.81 (#69.79 per fam- 
ily). Difference #566.69 per month. 

Total number single men on W.P.A. 
331. Total earnings on W.P.A., #19,- 
860. Total income while on direct relief, 
#5,438.33 (average #16.43 per person). 
Excess #14,421.67 per month. 

From these figures it is apparent that 
the families are earning from W.P.A. 
employment, #566.69 a month less than 
what they received while still on direct 
relief. On the other hand, the single 
men are now earning almost four times 
what they were previously granted. 

Although these comparisons may seem 
astonishing, yet one is not fully aware 
of the great discrepancies until one er- 
amines the situation of the larger fam- 
ilies. Of the 164 families mentioned, 
74 of them with from 2 to 4 members, 
are better off on W.P.A. work, a total 
excess of #1,137.01 per month, or an 



average of #15.36 per family per month. 
The 90 remaining families, with from 
6 to 11 members, earn a total of 
#1,703.70 a month less than their income 
while on direct relief. This deficiency 
ranges from #6.62 per month for the 
6-member family to #48.40 for the 11- 
member family. (The present incomes 
have been calculated to include average 
outside earnings of #6.33 per family per 
month in addition to W.P.A. wages). 
The Individual and the Family 

The W.P.A. has therefore succeeded 
in redistributing Uncle Sam's wealth 
among the Chinese relief population 
irrespective of size of family or budget- 
ary needs. The lone individuals and the 
smaller families earn more than they 
need, while the larger families earn be- 
low their subsistence level. The aims of 
the W.P.A., to give employment to the 
relief public on the basis of ability to 
earn as governed by professional classi- 
fication, have not been realized in China- 
town. On account of the differences 
of occupations of the Chinese from those 
of the general population, the W.P.A. 
cannot offer the variety of occupations 
adaptable to the Chinese. Again, because 
of the lack of higher-paid projects 
where Chinese can be conveniently 
placed, they have almost all been assign- 
ed to unskilled labor. The redistribution 
of public money, at least for the Chinese, 
has consequently been inversely pro- 
portional to the needs of each family in- 
stead of directly proportional to the 
earning power. 

Among the 331 single men now work- 
ing on labor projects, we find that their 
median age is 52 years, and that 28 per 
cent of them are 60 years or more. This 
latter group of men, though physically 
able, are practically unemployable, even 
in economically normal times. Their 
employment records show that they have 
had no steady employment for the last 
five years, that at the most, they can earn 
barely enough through seasonal or cas- 
ual work, to keep themselves from starva- 
tion. Thus, in a program to provide 
work for the needy, a large portion of 
the income is alloted to a group of indi- 
viduals who otherwise may be considered 
to have retired from the field of employ- 
ment. 

Surprising to say, although the larger 
families, by leaving the relief rolls to 
accept W.P.A. work, will earn consider- 
ably less than their relief budgets, yet 
they have not been known to refuse such 
work on these grounds. The larger num- 
ber of cases still remaining on the relief 



rolls has been a result more of the fail- 
ure of the W.P.A. set-up to mobilize 
rapidly enough to accomodate the large 
number than of any hesitancy on the 
clients' part to accept such work. Or, in 
some cases, social, mental, or medical 
problems may prevent the employable 
member temporarily from taking the 
job. The desire of any normal, self- 
respecting Chinese to work for a living 
is greater than any temptation to live 
at ease upon free "charity". Besides, 
to these people of steady working habits, 
any type of labor is welcome to break 
the monotony of idleness. 

Social Consequences 

What social consequences will result 
from such a work program? To the sin- 
gle men, it means increased income and 
a greater purchasing power, even over 
and above the average income for this 
group in normal times. That any ap- 
preciable portion of this income will go 
towards improving housing conditions is 
a matter of grave doubt. The influence 
of deeply-rooted habits and customs will 
preclude any thought of change in en- 
vironment. The expectation that such 
a work program will not be permanent 
will not be inducive towards altering 
their mode of living. The amount of 
money to be spent for rent, utilities, and 
food will therefore remain about the 
same, and any increase will be negligible. 
Since these bare necessities will consume 
about one half of the #60, where will 
the remainder go? It is estimated that 
this "excess" will be spent in three ways: 
the payment of old debts, the increased 
support of dependents in China, and 
greater indulgence in leisure-time pleas- 
ures. The few theatres in the vicinity 
of Chinatown, the pool rooms, the 
"lucky' parlors may hope for more 
thriving business in the immediate future. 

For the smaller families the increase 
in income is not great, since these fam- 
ilies generally have more than one em- 
ployable member. They were able, even 
while on relief, to supplement their bud- 
gets by irregular income through casual 
employment. These 70 and some odd 
families will undoubtedly continue to live 
on the same standard as when receiving 
direct relief. 

Readjustments Necessary 

The plight of the larger families is 
easily imagined. The reduced income 
means a strenuous struggle to "make ends 
meet". It means a more exhaustive search 
for all available sources of additional 
income. At this point, the majority will 
(Continued on Page 15) 



January 10, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 11 



FASHIONS 



CLARA CHAN 




Cambodian 
e>all 

Wucr,j \7. I<936 
CfrAudi-fonum 



TALENTED CHINESE 
TO ATTEND PARI LI A 
OF 1936 

Under the able direction of James 
Richard Lee, the 25 members of the San 
Francisco Chinese Art Association will 
participate in the fourth annual parilia, 
to be held on January 17, at the Civic 
Auditorium. This annual gala occa- 
sion has always proved to be a great in- 
spirational event not only to artists, but 
also to layman of this city, and. already 
many interested members of our com- 
munity have joined this small artistic 
group to prepare for the coming ball. 

This year, the artists are delving into 
a mysterious and ancient civilization, 
Ankor-Vat, for the inspiration of the 
parilia. The theme, taken from the 
story, "The Fall of Ankor-Vat", is of 
such fantastic interest, that I must needs 
present to you. 
Inspiring Theme. 

The setting is at the court of Kambu. 
Kambu, founder of the race of Kambu- 
jas, married the Princess of Nagas, an 
immortal whose real form was that of 
a seven-headed cobra. When Kambu 
married this princess, her father exacted 
a promise from Kambu: that every prince 
of Kambujas must first be betrothed to 



the Princess of Nagas before selecting 
a mortal bride. 

It came to pass that several princes 
appeared before the King and Queen 
for the purpose of selecting their mortal 
brides. "They came to the Temple of 
Ankor-Vat with their elephants, their 
warriors and their trains, and formed a 
great gathering before the shrine of the 
Emerald Buddha. There each Prince, 
in turn, betrothed himself to the Princess 
of the Nagas as had been promised, and 
then selected his bride; until it came the 
turn of the last Prince. He made his 
choice of a bride and had not first kept 
the promise of Kambu." 

When this happened, the anger of 
the Princess of Nagas was evoked; she 
assumed her immortal form of the seven- 
headed cobra. "Slowly she advanced to 
the shrine until she stood before the 
Emerald Buddha. Standing there, she 
called Siva the Destroyer to visit upon 
Ankor-Vat and the race of the Kambu- 
jas .... The Emerald Buddha glowed, 
and the thousands of green eyes in the 
snails on his head burned into the peo- 
ple, and destruction fell upon all of 
them and upon Ankor-Vat." 
Assigned as Annam Group 

With this as their theme, the different 
art groups of the city will no doubt aspire 
(Continued on Page 12) 



FASHIONS AMID 
SERPENTINE 

Hail, hail, the gangs all here, and 
Happy New Year greetings echoed and 
re-echoed across, around, and up the 
balcony, and down on the dance floor! 
It was the night of the Cathay New 
Year's Eve dance at the Trianon Ball- 
room. A capacity crowd of gay celeb- 
rants attended, beautifully gowned so- 
phisticates, and their white-tied escorts. 
Such fun, such gaiety, and what a suc- 
cessful party, why, it didn't end till way 
in the wee hours! 

For the young 'uns, New Year must 
have been an excellent excuse to stay out 
late, for among the assemblage of young 
matrons and smart co-eds, I came across 
two very charming, very young misses. 
Both of the young girls were modishly 
clad in the coming season's favorite 
color, blue. Miss Mary Chin's gown of 
periwinkle blue matelasse crepe was gath- 
ered from V-neck to hip line to give a 
graceful front fullness. The effect of a 
slight train at back of skirt was created 
by an inserted panel. Lame trimmed the 
neck and low back. Little girl, you looked 
very sophisticated and grown up, and of 
course, very charming in your gown. 

The other little miss in blue — Rose 
Louie, wore a girlish model to enhance 
her youthful grace. The gown, with a 
plain fitted skirt, had the fullness con- 
centrated at the bodice. A short jacket 
with long sleeves and small collar made 
of the same blue crepe completed this 
youthful ensemble. Miss Louie, you 
shouldn't have covered up this pretty 
dress of yours under your Chinese wrap, 
gorgeous though your wrap was. 

Mrs. Andrew Sue wore a stunning 
creation of imported metallic cloth. Her 
gown was simple but chic in line, and the 
rich white and silver material was most 
becoming to her dark beauty. 

From the East Bay region came sev- 
eral well known visitors to celebrate the 
holiday: Mrs. Lester Lee, looking very 
chic in her all-black gown, with a huge 
orchid as the only brightening touch. 
Miss Ada Lee, the tall slim beauty, looked 
very lovely in her tunic gown of white 
with rhinestones like scattering stars on 
the tunic blouse. You Oakland ladies 
must come to see us more often. 
(Continued on Page 12) 



Page 12 

YANG KUEI FEI 

By Dr. Henry H. Hart 

England has had her Nell Gwyn, 
France her Pompadour and her Main- 
tenon, and China her Yang Kuei Fei. 
Like her European sisters she ruled a 
kingdom. Even more, she ruled an em- 
pire. The story of her rise to supreme 
power and her fall and death fill one 
of the most romantic and tragic chap- 
ters in the long, long roll of China's 
fascinating history. 

It seems to be one of the ironies of 
fate that with few exceptions the women 
who have played important roles in 
China's story have brought destruction, 
suffering, war and rebellion upon their 
people. And the tale of Yang Kuei 
Fei, "The Precious Concubine," is no 
exception. 

She was born at the beginning of the 
eighth century, the daughter of Duke 
Yang, President of the Board of War, 
and a man of great influence at court. 

Her given name was Yu Huan — 
"jade bracelet". As a young girl she was 
educated far beyond the average Chinese 
woman, and soon became famous at court 
for her beauty, her grace and her tal- 
ents. The old chroniclers record that 
she was the loveliest woman who ever 
lived in China, and they all emphasize 
the fact that she was stout — the only 
fat beauty in all China's history. 

At seventeen she was given by her 
father as a concubine to Prince Shou, 
the eighteenth son of the emperor — a 
most advantageous match. 

At this time China was the greatest em- 
pire the world had ever known. It ex- 
tended from the frozen tundras of 
Siberia to the steaming jungles of 
Annam, and from the Caspian Sea to 
the broad Pacific. Its power and its 
glory far exceeded those of Rome at the 
height of its power. And Ming Huang, 
"The 'Brilliant Emperor," was sole lord 
and autocrat of this vast and wealthy 
empire. 

His first wife had died, and none of 
his thousands of concubines seemed able 
to rouse him from his grief and his 
apathy. 

Finally one of his ministers remem- 
bered the beauty and the accomplish- 
ments of the Emperor's daughter-in-law. 
He suggested that she be presented at 
court. In due time she came, surround- 
ed by her maids-in-waiting. The em- 
peror — he was then 53 — fell madly in 
love with her at first sight. At the im- 
perial command the dutiful son sur- 
rendered his beloved wife to his father. 



CHINESE DIGEST 

The young woman, with visions of un- 
limited power as the concubine of the 
Lord of the Four Seas, pretended to ac- 
cept the decision after much weeping 
and wailing for the loss of her young 
husband, but rejoicing secretly at the 
great change in her life. From being the 
concubine of a prince seventeen times 
removed from inheriting the throne to 
ruling the heart of the Emperor himself 
was the supreme step for the wily, schem- 
ing daughter of the Yangs. 

As soon as he had secured her for 
his own, Ming Huang conferred a new 
name upon his favorite — Yang Kuei Fei 
(the precious concubine) and by this 
name she is known to history. 

Jealous, impetuous, temperamental, 
capricious and revengeful, she led her 
imperial master a merry chase. Ming 
Huang had been the example of a per- 
fect prince before he fell into the 
clutches of Yang Kuei Fei. His wisdom, 
his energy and his solicitude for his peo- 
ple were proverbial. As a young man 
he had closed the silk factories, forbid- 
den the wearing of silks, jewels or em- 
broideries, and had even burned his own 
luxurious garments and belongings to set 
the example of economy for his subjects. 

He had founded schools everywhere. 
He was a poet of considerable talent, a 
valiant warrior and a patron of the arts. 

With the entrance of Yang Kuei Fei 
into the palace all this was changed. Al- 
most overnight this sober, popular cm- 
p~ror plunged himself and his court 
(Continued on Page 16) 

FASHIONS 

(Continued from Page 11) 
Another lady in white, Mrs. Harry 
Mew, also known to the community as 
the young Dr. Louie, wore an unusual 
gown of heavy white satin. The high 
neckline in front was softly draped in 
the form of a turned down collar. The 
low decolletage in back had two crossed 
braids of shimmering satin. For a touch 
of color, she, too, had orchids. These 
lucky people! 

Instead of the usual flame red seen 
this mid-season, that gay little personal- 
ity, Mrs. Edward Chew (Ruthie to us) 
appeared at the dance in ..he new Spring 
red, which has a violet hue. The bodice 
of her gown was of chiffon with intricate 
shirring on the sleeves and neckline. The 
skirt of soft crepe, fitted at the hip line, 
flared in graceful folds below the knee. 
You made a very wise choice in selecting 
this becoming gown for the dance, 
Ruthie. 

We welcome people .'ho return to their 
home town for a sojourn. For instance, 
weren't we glad to see Mrs. Eugene 



January 10, 1936 



Wong, the former Miss Irene Chan, 
coming all the way from Seattle to spend 
New Year's Eve with us? In her gown 
of dark red moire with a black velvet 
sash, she seemed more lovely than ever. 
Among the bevy of beauties who ser- 
pentined around the floor, were Miss 
Janie Koe, in black taffeta, with two 
huge flounces to form collar and cape 
sleeves; Miss Alice Chew, in green crepe, 
low back, halter effect; Miss Lucille Jung, 
in black velvet and small white ermine 
collar, wearing a darling Juliet hat; Miss 
Evelyn Wing, in black taffeta, with satin 
coin dots, exquisite rhinestone clips, and 
silver slippers; Miss Irene Chun, in dark 
red crepe; and petite Mrs. Earl Louie, 
in white satin with girdle of red and 
silver metallic cloth. 

PARILIA 

(Continued from Page 11) 
to turn out a pageant more colorful and 
more dramatic than previous years. The 
parilia has widened its theme to include 
the Malay peninsula and the whole 
archipelago as well as the five protector- 
ates of French Indo-China. The San 
Francisco Chinese Art Association has 
been assigned as the Annam group, and 
the color used will be chiefly of 20 shades 
of yellow orange, with brilliant accents 
of black, silver, and gold. 

At the studio of one of the Chinese 
artists, Sik Cheung Lee, the congenial 
group of talented young men and women 
have turned out striking and fantastic 
creations. The fantastic head dresses 
created are gigantic and odd in design, 
while the costumes have clever drapings, 
and the delightful combination of- colors 
will lend imagination to dress designers 
of modern fashion. 

David Chun, president of the associa- 
tion, justly proud, reminded me that the 
small talented group won high honorable 
mention at the parilia of 1935. 

With such capable assistants as Mrs. 
Albert Chan and Sik Cheung Lee, the 
Chinese pageant at the Cambodian Ball 
will, no doubt, be an impressive presen- 
tation. 

One of the unsung heroes of the foot- 
ball season just ended was Edwin Dong, 
who played first-string for the Lick-Wil- 
merding Junior College. San Francisco, 
eleven. Ed was a backfield man. 
• • 

ALFRED B. CHONC 

INSURANCE 

Kansas City Life Insurance Co. 

Office SUlter 2995; Res. PRospcct 81 IS 

1 1 1 Sutler St., San Francitco 




January 10, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 13 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo 



Scouts — Shangtai Play 

What: The basketball "natural" of 
the season in Chinatown. 

Who: Shangtai versus Troop Three 
Scout Varsity. 

Why: For the championship of Wah 
Ying League. 

When: This Sunday afternoon, at 
2 p. m. First game at 1 p. m. 

Where: French Court, Pine Street 
above Grant Avenue. 

In what may prove to be the most 
thrilling and exciting game so far this 
season in Chinatown, Shangtai's formi- 
dable five clashes with the equally strong 
Scout Varsity, in the grand climax of 
the tourney. Winner of this contest 
will be crowned Bay Region Champion. 

Shangtai, potentially the greatest cage 
team of Chinese ever mustered, will have 
an advantage in height, weight and ex- 
perience. The team average is five feet 
ten per man, with its substitutes as good 
as the starting line-up players. However, 
in their league games, the Shangtais 
have not displayed any strong defense 
as they have shown in their offense, 
averaging about fifty points per contest 
for their season's tilts. 

The Varsity team is fast and their 
passing is marvelous to behold. Captain 
Earl Wong is one of the best shooters in 
the league, with Henry Kan passing 
superbly. This game is a toss-up, and 
fans will hesitate awhile before venturing 
to pick a winner, although they lean 
somewhat on edge for Shangtai. Both 
are undefeated in league standing. 

Possible starting line-ups: 

Scout Varsity: Pos. Shangtai: 

Henry Kan F. Charlie Hing 

Hin Chin F. Fred Wong 

Earl Wong C. Gerald Leong 

Don Lee G. Fred Gok 

Stephen Leong G. Ted Chin 

It is practically certain that Coach 
Joe Chew of Shangtai will rely greatly 
on his reserve strength to win, as George 
Lee, Fred Hing, Lee Po, Frank Yam, 
Thomas Tong, Wilson Lowe, and Walt- 
er Lee are all good performers. For 
the Scout Varsity, Herbert Tom, Frank 
Wong, Frank Lee, Silas Chinn, Eddie 
Leong, and Bing Chin may see plenty of 
action. 

Coach Don Lee of the Varsity, when 
asked for a statement regarding this "big 
game", remarked, "This is going to be 
a close and interesting contest. Shangtai 
has a wonderful team this year and we 
expect our toughest game of the season." 

Manager Arthur Hee of Shangtai 



RESULTS OF LEAGUE GAMES 

A good-sized crowd witnessed last Sun- 
day's league games at French Court. The 
Scout Varsity gave the Chi-Fornians a 
severe defeat, 49-17, while Shangtai 
laced the Nulite A. C. 54-23. 

After a thrilling first half, in which 
Chi-Fornians managed to hold the 
Scouts to a score of 22-15, the latter 
team walked away from the opposition. 
Baskets by Vic Wong and Jack Look and 
foul shots by D. Chinn kept the losers 
in the running. As in other contests, 
Chi-Fornians' lack of reserves was again 
evident. During the last quarter, their 
defense was ripped wide open by the 
Scouts' lightning passes and shots. Hen- 
ry Kan, Earl Wong, Silas Chinn, and 
Don Lee stood out for the Scouts, while 
Vic Wong was the losers' highlight. 

Minus the services of their highpoint- 
er, Wilfred Jue, Nulite failed to give 
Shangtai the stiff opposition that was 
expected, although the score at the half 
was fairly close, being 21-12, thanks to 
field goals by Howard Ho. Charlie 
Hing, Gerald Leong and George Lee 
were Shangtai's big scorers, while Fred 
Gok and Ted Chin played a beautiful 
floor game. For Nulite, Ho and Henry 
Chew were individual high-point men. 
Captain Gee was a tower of strength on 
defense. 

• • 

Ray Chun, who now drives a truck for 
a Grant Avenue grocery store, was one 
of the greatest football players ever de- 
veloped at Carson High School, Carson 
City, Nevada. A terrific blocker, he 
could be used both in the backfield as a 
block 'ng half, or in the line for interfer- 
ence to the ball carrier. Here's a tip to 
rome coach of Chinese grid teams in the 
future. Ray recently returned from Chi- 
na where he sojourned for a vacation. 

stated, "The Scout five is very strong. 
Earl Wong, Henry Kan and the other 
players are darn good, and we can only 
hop; to win." 

The other league game, the final one 
for both teams, brings together the Chi- 
Fornians and the Troop Three Juniors 
at 1 p. m. The two quintets are evenly 
matched and a tight contest may result. 
Chi-Fornian Club, theoretically a good 
hoop team which has failed to come up 
to expectations, will depend on Ted Lee, 
Vic Wong and Jack Lee to come through 
for a win, while the Juniors will rely on 
Fred Wong, Ted Moy, Al Young and 
Charles Low to carry the brunt of their 
attack. 



All-Star Candidates 

Inasmuch as the Wah Ying Basketball 
league schedule has but one more week 
to go, it would be of interest to name the 
players of the five teams who have been 
playing outstanding ball, and have shown 
their immense value to the clubs by 
their team-work and sportsmanship. 

Forwards: Charlie Hing and Fred 
Wong of Shangtai are both dead shots 
and good floormen as well as feeders. 
Henry Kan of the Scout Varsity is an 
all-around man who is valuable on team 
work. Wilfred Jue of Nulite gets his 
usual quota of points besides being a 
spark-plug to his team spirit. Ted Lee 
of the Chi-Fornians has been the team's 
main offensive threat in league play, as 
well as Fred Wong of the Scout Juniors. 

Centers: Captain Earl Wong of the 
Scout Varsity is a practical cinch due to 
his good work both offensively and de- 
fensively, besides furnishing the pep to 
his team. Howard Ho of the Nulites 
is a valuable all-around player. Gerald 
Leong and George Lee of Shangtai are 
both swell players and either one should 
deserve consideration on the All-Stars. 
Jack Look of Chi-Fornians is a fairly 
good player, but is being hampered by 
a small court. 

Guards: Fred Gok of Shangtai, has 
shown that he is by far the best guard 
in the league, a dependable and steady 
performer. Don Lee's value to his Scout 
Varsity five makes him a strong prospect 
for the All-Stars. Daniel Leong and 
Alfred Gee of Nulite forms a formidable 
combination, both being reliable guards. 
Captain Jack Lee of Chi-Fornians forms 
the nucleus of their defense and would 
be a worthy man for the Stars. Charles 
Low of the Scout Juniors is a hard-fight- 
ing guard and a fair shot. 

• • 

CHI-FORNIANS WIN 

Chi-Fornians basketball team did last 
Friday evening what it had failed to do 
this entire season — win a game. Led by 
Jack Look, center, who hit the basket 
for ten field goals and two free throws 
for 22 points, the Chi-Fornians scored 
their first victory of the season by drub- 
bing the Brandies Club of the Hayes 
Community Center, 44-23. The Chinese 
cagers were held to a half-time score of 
18-14, but the passing of Vic Wong, 
Ted Lee, Frank Choy and Look ran 
rings around the Brandies' defense in 
the second half. 



Page 14 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 10, 1936 



POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



It would do the florists good to have 
been at the Cathay New Year's Eve 
Dance, for didn't you notice the large 
number of orchid corsages? Gosh, it 
must have cost the boy friends quite a 
lot of dough. Looks like depression is 
dead — long live prosperity. 

Notice the number of out-of-towners 
who attended the dance? They wanted 
to be near the one and only at this 
dance. It is the custom to go with one's 
. And did you see me there? 

• • 

You have heard of the expression 
'drinking them under the table'? Well, 
here's a new one. Eating them under 
the table. It seems that there were quite 
a number of sandwiches left at a certain 
party. And the only way to get rid of 
them was to have boys draw cards and 
low man eats. Two persons with iron 
constitutions volunteered. And were 
they sick of and with sandwiches and 
candy. 

• • 

You probably recall in our last issue 
we had an item about the Young Wo 
Chinese School Graduation and about 
Miss Ng May Lun who received a 
GLOBE of the world as a prize for the 
highest scholastic honors. Wouldn't she 
appreciate it more if it were a TRIP a- 
round the world? Incidentally, I'd like to 
accompany her, or anybody for that mat- 
ter. (Anybody need a traveling compan- 
ion?) 

• • 

Dr. Dong left for Los Angeles to 
attend the Rose Bowl game last 
Monday. He had so much faith in the 
weather man that he left his rai-n coat 
here. Incidentally, it was raining when 
he left. I guess he believes the publicity 
man in Los Angeles, in that it never rains 
down south (?) . 

• • 

To my many readers and friends: 
I have been confronted with a problem 
on which I would like your advice. You 
know that the nature of my column is 
primarily to record humorous incidences 
and to write about persons, not neces- 
sarily to 'Walt Winchell' them. He 
receives a fabulous salary and doesn't 
care what people think of him. I re- 
ceive no remuneration and am very much 
concerned of what my readers and 
friends think of me. I mean no harm 
in my column and it is to be hoped that 
everyone takes it lightly. But sometimes 



something slips and the report is taken 
the wrong way. What do you think of 
junking this column? I would appre- 
ciate it very much if you would let me 
have your opinion. 



It is regrettable that so many of 
our readers borrow copies of the Chi- 
nese Digest from our subscribers. 

Do you know that maybe, after all, 
this column won't have to be junked, 
because if these readers keep on bor- 
rowing instead of subscribing or pur- 
chasing copies, pretty soon they won't 
need to borrow, cuz the Chinese Di- 
gest will be no more? Agree? Then, 
let's get together on this. Subscribe! 



ALLEE, the TOWNTROTTER, says: 
EMMA LUM left for China last week 
on the President Cleveland .... A "cer- 
tain" successful bachelor, his name now 
changed to CHIN QUONG, is back with 

us again (watch for him, girls) 

GEORGE CHUNG "Clark Gable of 
Chinatown" and a "Miss Tong" are seen 
together these days. Both are working 
at the Ramona Dining Room .... TAFT 
CHUNG "dee beeg brudder" is also 
doing well in Hollywood, having a part 
in the picture "Good Earth" .... Fran- 
cisco High will stage their dance on the 
24th at the Garden Room, good music 
is promised by the CHINATOWN 
KNIGHTS .... LARRY CHAN (croo- 
ner with operatic lilt) will sing for the 
orchestra .... WILBUR WONG "born 
under a lucky star" buys two tickets for 
thirty cents to see the Heald College 
Exhibits, and wins a $25.00 radio and a 
Parker pen and pencil set .... HAR- 
OLD WONG goes back to Los Angeles, 
after a strenuous week here in China- 
town .... RUBY FONG recovers from 
a bad cold .... Did you know two 
couples went wading out at the beach 
at three o'clock one morning? (guess 
thev didn't have enuf to drinkee) .... 
KITTY NG (still in Texas) burns her 
fingers shooting firecrackers, now hires a 
secretary to type her letters .... Did 
you see the triplets at the New Year's 
Eve Dance? "JACKIE", "CHESTIE" 
an' OATS"? And it appears to be a 
pretty heavy bet that the one who marries 
first, must buy the others a suit (same 
material, same style) and with ties to 
match. Poor "JACKIE" has to pay-off. 
ANDREW SUE must be encouraging 
such wagers — oh,yeah? It's just one 
of those bachelor-bets, (try it sumtime!) 
.... FANNY LEW (Oakland) has her 
birthday on January eleven .... 
SO LONG ! 



CERAMIC ART 

(Continued from Page 6) 
on this vessel had been ground to the 
level of the base, which is ur\glazed, and 
of a grayish-white biscuit. The spurs 
themselves are about half the size of a 
grain of rice, white in color, and were 
located only because the biscuit is more 
porous than the spur remains. 

Spur marks are no longer to be found 
on modern Chinese porcelain, new me- 
thods having been evolved which appar- 
ently leaves no trace on the wares. But 
spur marks are still to be found on most 
provincial pottery. They are also lo- 
cated on all objects which need to be 
completely glazed, such as porcelain buc- 
kles and table ornaments. They are 
found on most European dishes, for 
Europeans prefer to have dishes com- 
pletely glazed. Thus most English 
"breakfast dishes" have three minute 
spur marks immediately outside of the 
footrim. The spurs were invariably 
carefully grounded to just a little below 
the surface and so are barely visible to 
the naked eye. 

Tell-Tale Spur Marks 

Celadons were made by Chinese in 
many localities besides historic Lung 
Ch'uan. Those made by Sung Dynasty 
Chinese in Siam have tube markings, 
while those made in certain Canton kilns 
have ring marks (to be described later). 
Korean celadons have marks of sand 
heapings on the foot rim. 

Spur marks were found on all Japan- 
ese wares up to as late as a century ago. 
One Imari platter has nine spurs arrang- 
ed in three rows located on the glazed 
area inside the foot rim. Most 

nineteenth century Kutani Kaga wares 
have from seven to nine spurs arranged 
in a circle, while one Japanese celadon 
or sei ji jar has the spurs arranged in 
a square, with an additional spur inside 
the square. These spurs were porcelain 
cones, and after they were broken 
off the plates, no efforts were made to 
grind them down, leaving a "pimply" 
appearance on the area. This technique 
is derived from Sung Dynasty ju chou 
potters. This is one way of distinguish- 
ing certain Japanese wares from Chinese 
wares — the location of the spur marks 
inside of the foot rim — but to experts 
there are many other criteria. 

Some Cantonese potters also place 
spurs in the area inside the foot rim, 
but these are inconspicuous and few in 
number, whereas the Japanese spurs. 
like those on Sung Dynasty Chun wares, 
are "spiky" and numerous. 

Copyrighted. 1 9} 6. by Chitvgwah L*« 

(Next Week: How the Sung Potters 
Eliminated the Spurs.) 



January 10, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 15 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Hoover (San Fran- 
cisco) Jan. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Feb. 4; President Taft (San 
Francisco) Feb. 12; President Cleve- 
land (San Francisco) Mar. 3; Presi- 
dent Hoover (San Francisco) Mar. 11; 
President Taft (San Francisco) Mar. 31; 
President Coolidge (San Francisco) 
Apr. 8. 
SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Garfield (San Fran- 
cisco) Jan. 17; President Hoover (San 
Francisco) Jan. 24; President Polk 
(San Francisco) Jan. 31; President 
Taft (San Francisco) Feb. 7; President 
Adams (San Francisco) Feb. 14; Presi- 
dent Coolidge (San Francisco) Feb. 21; 
President Harrison (San Francisco) 
Feb. 28. 

Canton's Unemployed 

Canton — This city, the chief com- 
mercial center of all South China, today 
faces an unemployment problem as acute 
as any large industrial and commercial 
metropolis in America during the de- 
pression period. 

A survey recently completed by the 
government places the number of un- 
employed factory hands and workers in 
industrial plants at slightly over 30,000 
people. This staggering figure does not 
include employees in business houses and 
small shops who have been thrown out 
of jobs as a result of the world-wide 
depression. 

The survey revealed that Canton has 
180,000 workers in industrial plants and 
factories. Industrial enterprises which 
were once thriving and prosperous but 
now completely shut down number 
205. These plants once employed more 
than 23,000 workers. 

The nature of the factories and manu- 
facturing works now closed include: 
cleaning and dyeing plants, 94; electri- 
cal works, 19; chemical works, 17; brick, 
tile and stone-making works, 10; food 
manufacturers, 8; glass factories, 7; oil 
manufacturers, 5; hat manufacturers^; 
paper manufacturers and printing works, 
3; and 37 other manufacturers of various 
commodities. 



TALENTED ACTRESS TO ARRIVE 

Miss Ing Tang, leading lady of the 
Shanghai production, "Lady Precious 
Stream", will arrive in San Francisco 
sometime this month from China. 

Miss Tang is the sister of Youlo Tang, 
who was private secretary to Dr. T. V. 
Soong, and who was killed several years 
ago when a bomb thrown at His Excel- 
lency, killed Mr. Tang instead. 

Miss Tang is an accomplished actress, 

and a famous Soochow beauty. This 

will be her first trip abroad, and. will also 

mark her debut on Broadway, New York. 

• • 

Dr. P. C. Chang, professor of Tsing 
Hua University and lecturer of the 
University of Hawaii will soon arrive in 
San Francisco on a lecture tour. He is 
scheduled to speak in this city. 

RECREATION SCHEDULE 

Shangtai will undertake to play seven 
powerful teams in their schedule in the 
City Recreation League, Unlimited Div- 
ision C. Sixteen teams are entered in 
this division, which has been divided in- 
to two brackets. Winner of each brac- 
ket will vie for the division title. Shang- 
tai's first game will have been played as 
we go to press, meeting the National 
Assurance team on Wednesday, Jan. 8. 
The rest of the Shangtai schedule is as 
follows: Jan 15, Joan of Arc; Jan 20, 
Sunset Majors; Jan 27, Norsemen; Feb. 
3, Rovers; Feb. 10, Tay-Holbrook; Feb. 
19, Panthers A. C. 

• • 

ST MARY'S A. C. HAS INSTRUCTOR 

The services of Mr. Leo Carr, a mem- 
ber of the Olympic Club boxing team, 
has been secured for the recently organi- 
zed St. Mary's Athletic Club. Mr. Carr 
will act as instructor and general super- 
visor of activities for this new organi- 
zation. The club officials have announ- 
ced that training and coaching in the 
various fields of athletics, such as basket- 
ball, swimming, boxing, etc. will com- 
mence for its members within the month. 



"Doc" Putman 

HIGH GRADE USED CARS 



724 Van Ness Avenue 
Phone TUxedo 9933 



WPA and CHINATOWN 

(Continued from Page 10) 
contend that since many of these families 
never earned more than $60, even before 
the depression, there should be no diffi- 
culty for them to return to former stan- 
dards. While this assertion may be true, 
it must be remembered that when these 
families received larger incomes when 
they came on relief, their living standards 
have been greatly raised, as evidenced 
by better living quarters, more varied 
diets, and more educational opportuni- 
ties. A relapse to former living condi- 
tions is not so simple as it sounds, for it 
is physically and psychologically much 
easier to raise one's living standards 
than to lower them. The problem here 
of adjustment is not one to be treated 
lightly. 

The most immediate changes to take 
place among these larger families placed 
on W.P.A. work will be the surrendering 
of many things which formerly were 
necessities, but now have become luxuries. 
There will be a move towards reducing 
rentals by returning to smaller and 
poorer quarters. The consumption of 
milk will be drastically cut. There will 
be less money for recreation, for leisure- 
time enjoyment. Many of the children 
will not be able to continue attending 
the Chinese evening schools. Unless the 
W.P.A. can provide medical care these 
families will be unable to afford medical 
attention except for emergencies. 

Social Planning Urgent 

The continued efforts of the social 
workers to keep mo;hers of large families 
home to care for their children will prove 
of no avail now that the mothers are 
virtually forced to seek gainful employ- 
ment to supplement W.P.A. wages. They 
will be found in garment factories and 
shrimp companies, leaving their babies 
at home alone or in the care of older 
children. 

Chinese social workers are of the opin- 
ion that these problems of social rehabili- 
tation, while associated with the W.P.A. 
programs, are not actually caused by 
the W.P.A. They are problems which 
could be foreseen at the height of the 
present relief program, and which grew 
out of the long siege of unemployment 
upon Chinatown followed by the many 
experimental attempts of the public gov- 
ernment to relieve the economic distress. 
At no time is careful social planning and 
individual case work more needed in 
this "depression-weary' community. 



Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 10, 1936 



YANG KUEI FEI 

(Continued from Page 12) 
into extravagant revelry, debauchery and 
dissipation, abandoning the administra- 
tion of the government to other hands. 

He spent all his time devising new 
pleasures, new amusements for this siren 
who had so easily acquired absolute con- 
trol over him. The state treasury was 
drained in satisfying her whims, and in 
showering gifts to win her back from fre- 
quent fits of unreasoning anger. Taxa- 
tion became heavier and heavier in an 
effort to supply her every demand, and 
the patient people commenced to mur- 
mur and to groan under the burden. 

Ming Huang soon began to neglect 
the affairs of state, and the glorious dyn- 
asty of T'ang, painstakingly and labori- 
ously built up by his five predecessors, 
slowly weakened. With its foundation 
undermined and honeycombed by palace 
intrigue and crookedness, it began in a 
few years to sway and totter towards its 
call. 

Concerned only with his pleasure and 
with the wishes of his consort, the Em- 
peror all too readily handed over his 
responsibilities as ruler of his people to 
hands greedily stretched out to adminis- 
ter them to their own profit. 

With little difficulty Yang Kuei Fei 
had her brother, a drunken gambler, 
raised to the highest office. To strength- 
en her grip on the government, she in- 
troduced her three sisters into the imper- 
ial haven. All power, all influence, all 
gifts were in her hands. Eunuchs held 
many of the official posts. The emperor 
slowly degenerated until he was a help- 
less, vacillating tool in her hands. 

One of her whims cost the empire un- 
told wealth. The empire had been 
flooded with counterfeit coins, and the 
Prime Minister was at his wits end to de- 
vise some method of stopping the deluge. 
Yang Kuei Fei demanded that she be 
allowed to handle the situation. She 
offered by public decree to buy in the 
counterfeit money, paying one honest 
coin for five false coins. To escape pun- 
ishment and to realize on the worthless 
money, everyone hastened to the treas- 
ury with the counterfeits, taking good 
money in exchange. When the treasury 
was emptied of good money and was 
. overflowing with the bad, Yang Kuei Fei 
ordered all the Imperial bills to be paid 
with the counterfeit money that she 
gathered in. The result can be better 
imagined than told. 

To further amuse her, Ming Huan 
established a troupe of actors and act- 
resses in a part of his palace gardens 
known as "The Pear Orchard." In this 



secluded spot many beautiful theatrical 
performances were given for the imper- 
ial lovers and their court. This encour- 
agement and subsidy of the drama by 
the emperor marks the real beginning of 
the modern Chinese theatre. Actors are 
known as "The Children of the Pear 
Orchard" to this day, and incense is 
burned in every theatre in China as an 
offering to Ming Huang, the imperial 
spendthrift, now deified and worshipped 
as the tutelary genius of the actors' 
guilds. 

To the imperial court came poets, 
philosophers, musicians and artists — the 




very flower of the Chinese genius. It 
seemed as though the Golden Age had 
arrived. For twenty years the mad ex- 
travagance, the brilliant court ceremon- 
ies, the poverty, oppression and misgov- 
ernment — all the imperial serio-comic 
tragedy continued. But the rottenness 
and decay were spreading their roots 
everywhere, and the day of reckoning 
was at hand. 

Careless, neglectful, soon wearying of 
the aging, doddering Ming Huang, sunk 
as he was in cloth and drunkenness, the 
Precious Concubine flung all discretion 
to the winds, and took unto herself one 
lover after another. 

But one day she went too far. The 
Emperor had taken a fancy to An Lu 
Shan, a young and successful general of 
hot Tartar blood, and had made him a 
favorite at court. Yang Kuei Fei added 
him to her list, loving him not wisely, but 
too well. Palace intrigue finally forced 
his exile to the far frontier. Furious at the 
treatment meted out to him, An Lu Shan 
raised the flag of revolt. The time was 
ripe. The people, ground down by taxes, 



scourged and oppressed beyond endur- 
ance by eunuchs and hangers-on of the 
court, misruled by the upstart Yangs, 
flocked to his standard. 

An Lu Shan marched on the capital. 
The Emperor, incompetent, powerless, 
fled with his favorite and a few regi- 
ments of troops that had remained faith- 
ful. But when they reached the town of 
Ma Wei even these loyal troops mutinied, 
and refused to serve or longer protect 
their emperor unless he put to death his 
favorite concubine and all of the hated 
family. 

The old man was helpless and power- 
less. Sadly he ordered the chief eunuch 
to carry out the pitiless commands of 
his rebellious soldiers. 

The famous poet, Po Chu I, who wrote 
shortly after these events occurred, has 
told the tale vividly and with masterly 
brush strokes in a poem known by all 
Chinese school boys — "The Song of the 
Everlasting Wrong." 

Again we see the impotent emperor 
weeping in his chariot. In glittering 
ranks the grim soldiers stand silent on 
the sun-drenched dusty plain. Slowly, 
in all her finery and bedecked with 
jewels, the fallen favorite is led out be- 
fore the troops by the old eunuch, in his 
hand the fatal silken bowstring gleam- 
ing yellow in the sun. 

To quote the poet: 

There was no escape, 
And sobbing and weeping 
She of the curved moth-eyebrows 
Was led out to her death. 

The eunuch knew his duty all too well. 
A few swift movements, a few short mo- 
ments, and all was over. 

Again the poet sings: 

There she lay, 

Strangled in the dust, 

In the sight of all men. 

At .he very wheel 

Of the Imperial war chariot. 

The rebellion died down with her 
dca'h, and with the destruction of her 
family, whose sinister influence had all 
but wrtcked the empire. But Ming Huang 
wa: 1 c- i t . a disconsolate, broken old man. 
H? abdicated in favor of his son, and 
retired into th? seclusion of a monastery. 
There, half-demented and despised, he 
spent the remainder of his days, seeking 
in vain by prayer and charm and incan- 
tation, to bring back from the Western 
Paradise the soul of his dead love, the 
Precious Concubine, Yang Kuei Fei. 

For love he had lost an empire, tor 
love he hid dragged in the dust and 
dimmed forever the glory of the Tang* 




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Vol. 2, No. 3 



January 17, 1936 



Five Cents 



CURRENT NEWS ABOUT CHINA 



By Tsu Pan 



• ITALY RECOGNIZE "MANCHUKUO?" 

• SINO-JAPANESE CONFERENCE 

• THE ARITA EPISODE 

• JAPANESE MOVE TO MONGOLIA 

Rumors have been brewing in the Far Eastern front 
last week that Japan has already obtained the consent 
of Italy to recognize the status of her illegal child, 
"Manchukuo". This move on the part of Italy, it is 
reported, is prompted by her desire to bring about 
economic rapprochement with Japan. 

In exchange for the recognition, Italy will extend 
to Japan her shipping line and will also conclude a 
trade agreement with the island empire. Although 
there was no official information from either source 
to verify such an assertion, 'yet the report went as far 
as saying that the Italian government had already named 
the Conte Verdi as the first vessel to be placed under 
regular service to Japan. 

In Tokio, the arrival of Leone Weillschott, former 
counsellor at the Italian Embassy there, had caused 
wild speculation of the recognition theory. Weillschott 
was newly appointed as Italian consul-general with a 
rank of Minister Plenipotentiary at Hsinking, the 
capital of the puppet state, and was stopping over at 
Tokio for official business. Weillschott said he was 
merely vacationing, but speculators believed his pres- 
ence there had serious meaning. 

In reply to a query raised by the Nanking govern- 
ment, the Italian authorities explained that the opening 
of a new consulate at Hsinking does not mean recogni- 
tion of "Manchukuo". 



A report from Tokio indicated that the Japanese 
foreign office had accepted the Chinese invitation to 
a conference to adjust the problems of Sino-Japanese 
dispute in toto. The success of this conference, the 
Japanese authorities said, depends upon the sincerity 
on the part of the Chinese to follow the three funda- 
mental principles previously raised by Foreign Mini- 
ster Hirota; namely, first, cooperation between China, 
Japan and "Manchukuo", second, suppressing com- 
munist and anti-Japanese activities in entire China, and 
third, a reconsideration of Nanking's silver nationali- 
zation policy. 



What is expected from the future Sino-Japanese 
conference may be learned from the change of Jap- 
anese diplomatic personnels in China. Arita Ariyoshi, 
Japanese Ambassador to China, was doing a fine piece 
of work for the Mikado until the Japanese military 
group accused him of being too "soft" in dealing with 
Nanking officials. Consequently, Ariyoshi was thrown 
to the cold bench and was promptly replaced by Ha- 
chiro Arita, Japanese Ambassador to Belgium, now 
on furlough in Tokio. 

The appointment of Arita at once brought back 
unpleasant memories to the Chinese people. When 
the Japanese presented China with the infamous 
"twenty one demands" in 1915, Arita was the counsellor 
to the Japanese Legation in Peking. Being a radiant 
and youthful diplomat of excitable disposition, Arita 
freely exhibited his eloquence with the aid of his ivory 
tipped cane in front of President Yuan Shih-kai. Yuan 
Shih-kai accepted the "twenty one demands" but was 
not so much pleased about Arita's mannerism. Later, 
when Arita was appointed by Japan as Minister to 
China, the Peking government refused to accept him. 

In addition to appointing Arita as Japanese Am- 
bassador, the Japanese foreign office also transferred 
Kaname Wagasugi, who was formerly stationed in 
Peiping, to assist Arita in the Japanese Embassy in 
Shanghai. Wagasugi is noted as an old "China hand" 
who can speak Chinese as fluently as a native. He 
was, a few years ago, Japanese consul-general in San 
Francisco. 

The presence of these characters in the Japanese 
diplomatic battle front indicates the aggressiveness of 
the Japanese policy. 



The province of Chahar was in a state of turmoil 
last week when a squad of Japanese bombing planes 
escorted the "Manchukuan" troops in penetrating into 
the city of Fenchen. The Japanese also instigated the 
Mongolian soldiers to join the Manchu forces and to 
revolt against the Chinese authorities. An autonomous 
regime was established in the area after the Chinese was 
overpowered by the combined strength of "Manchu- 
kuan", Mongolian, and Japanese forces. 

Reports from Kalgan stated that the Japanese army 
was pouring truckloads of munitions into Chinese Inner 
Mongolia, apparently as an advance move in prepara- 
tion for a showdown with Sovietized Outer Mongolia. 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17, 1936 



FAR EAST 



Shanghai Drug Clinics 

The opening of additional clinics to 
cure drug addicts in Shanghai's three 
municipalities heralded the speeding up 
of China's war on the opium habit. In 
these clinics the addicts are housed until 
cured of their habit, which usually takes 
from two to three weeks, it was reported. 
Upkeep of these clinics, totalling ap- 
proximately $5,000 monthly, is furnished 
from funds of the Municipality of Great- 
er Shanghai and the Chinese Courts. 

The first drug clinic was officially in- 
stituted in Shanghai in September, 1934, 
although in July of the same year the 
clinic had started to receive patients. In 
two months this clinic gave treatment 
to 732 addicts, 618 of whom were men 
and 114 women. More than 300 of 
these addicts came voluntarily requesting 
treatment. 

The method of curing addicts, gen- 
erally used in China today, is the appli- 
cation of a compound which includes 
ammonia fortia and a ten per cent 
solution of spirit of camphor. The com- 
pound is injected in the chest or abdomen 
which soon causes a swelling under the 
skin. The pus from this swelling is ex- 
tracted and then injected as an anti- 
toxin. This method of treatment has 
been found to be very effective, especial- 
ly for the cure of addicts of "red pills" 
and morphine. A Dr. Modino is credit- 
ed with the discovery of this simple 
treatment. 

• • 

NEW AIR LINE TO LINK 

SIAN AND CHENGTU 

The Eurasia Aviation Corporation has 
been ordered by the Ministry of Com- 
munications to make preparations for 
the inauguration of the newly projected 
Sian-Chengtu airline 

Three two-motor Junkers planes have 
been ordered by the Corporation from a 
German firm for service on the line. 

A trial flight on the new air route will 
be made on July 31 by the Corporation. 
If the flight proves successful, the new 
air service will be formally inaugurated 
in the middle part of August. 

For the purpose of further expanding 
and developing aerial services of the 
Eurasia Aviation Corporation, the Mini- 
stry of Communications has made 
arrangements with its German authori- 
ties for the raising of the capital of the 
Corporation from $5,000,000 to $7,500, 
000. The amount of shares of the Chi- 
nese and German sides of the Corpora- 
tion will be in the same proportion as 
■previously fixed. 



District Bandit Cleanup 

Sutsien district of China has been 
practically cleaned of bandits by prov- 
incial troops. During the past few 
months thousands of suspicious charac- 
ters have been arrested and those who 
are known to be bandits are immediately 
killed with no questions asked. These 
troops have been sweeping the bandit 
sections systematically, surrounding 
whole villages and searching them. In 
cases where more careful investigation is 
required, the suspects are sent to Tsin- 
kiangpu, where they are either shot or 
released upon guarantee by head men 
of the districts. 

• • 

CHINESE DIET BEST 

Dr. G. Arbour Stephens, eminent 
British medical man, declared in a re- 
cent article in the "Medical Officer", 
that the Chinese, with communal kitchens, 
are the best fed people in the world. He 
further stated that the Hawaiians 
and the Irish are losing health and vigor 
by indulgence in an over "luxurious" 
type of American dietary, and that Great 
Britain's national diet of roast beef, 
Yorkshire pudding, roast potatoes and 
cabbages is dangerous. 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

e 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 

CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 

FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jacksc.i Street 



SUN YAT-SEN CULTURAL 
INSTITUTE ESTABLISHED 
IN CANTON 

A Sun Yat-sen Cultural Institute, the 
purpose of which is similar to the Sun 
Yat-sen Cultural Institute of Nanking, 
namely the promotion of the principles 
and teachings of Dr. Sun Yat-sen, has 
recently been founded by a group of 
prominent government and Party leaders 
in Canton. 

A set of regulations governing the 
organization of the Institute has already 
been worked out. According to the re- 
gulations, the Institute shall have a 
Board of Directors composed of 1 1 mem- 
bers, and there shall be three standing 
members to be elected from among the 
members of tht Board to take charge 
of routine affairs. 

The regulations further provide that 
the Institute shall have three depart- 
ments, namely, general affairs, editing, 
and historic spots preservation. 

Funds for the Institute shall be de- 
rived from the following sources: con- 
tribution from various organizations and 
individuals, government subsidies, re- 
ceipts from publications. 

It is learned that Hu Han-min, Chow 
Lu, Lin Yi-chung, Lin Yun-kai, Huang 
Lin-tu, Liu Chi-wei, Ho Kwang-ho, Lin 
Kuo-pei, General Chen Chi-tang, Gener- 
al Li Chung-jen, and General Li Yang- 
chin have been elected members of the 
Board of Directors of the Institute. 

It may be stated that the Institute in 
Nanking was founded sometime ago by 
Mr. Sun Fo, President of the Legislative 
Yuan and son of the late Dr. Sun Yat-sen. 

• • 

PRINCE TOMB ROBBED 

A band of 200 bandits are wanted by 
the Chinese police for the robbery of 
the tombs of Prince Kung, son of the 
Manchu Emperor Hsienfeng (1861). 
So far, two suspects have been arrested. 
Until recently, the tombs had been guard- 
ed by Chinese troops. Upon their re- 
moval, the bandits appeared and stripped 
all valuables from the tombs, which are 
located near Peiping. 

• • 

The Nanking Government is provid- 
ing free education for Mongol and Turki 
youths from Turkestan, in the hope that 
schooling may bring about the unifica- 
tion of the Chinese. These Mohamme- 
dan tribesmen have never been com- 
pletely conquered or absorbed by the 
Chinese; and military force and political 
coercion by the Central Government 
have been unsuccessful. 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



CHINESE SOCIETY MEETS 

At their monthly meeting last Mon- 
day, the China Society of San Francisco 
gathered to hear a talk by their president, 
Dr. L. M. H. Boisseree, on "The Cloth- 
ing of the Chinese People During the 
Days of the Empire". The lecture was 
illustrated by rare colored pictures and 
photographs. 

The Society has as its aim the spread- 
ing of the knowledge of China and its 
people, present and past, particularly 
through the study of ancient Chinese art 
and culture. They also arrange exhibits, 
collect books on the Orient, and give 
publicity to important Chinese events. 

The Society was founded in 1915 by 
Professor Fryer, Dr. Forcke, and Dr. 
Kiang Kang-hu. Dr. Boisseree is one of 
its earliest lecture-members. The office 
is at 2331 Jackson Street. 

• • 

PRIDE OF CHINESE 
PREVENTS AMPUTATION 

Detroit, Mich. — An ancient belief of 
some Chinese is preventing an operation 
which may mean life or death to a 
fifty-two year old Chinese. Chan Hong 
Tim, suffering an infection in his leg, 
had been advised by his physician to 
have his leg amputated. However, Chan, 
a laundry and restaurant business man, 
steadfastly refused in the belief that he 
would be shamed when he faces his folks 
in China. His friends and association 
members are getting in touch with Chan's 
relatives in Chicago to get them to con- 
vince him that the operation is vitally 
necessary. 

• • 

20 YEARS A FLORIST 
Frank Young, one of the pioneers in 
the floral business is rounding out his 
twentieth year with the present firm of 
Sheridan and Bell, located at 120 Maid- 
en Lane. 

Mr. Young is an expert in all depart- 
ments of his trade, having been in every 
stage of the business from grower to 
seller. Patrons of Sheridan and Bell 
will remember their former store on 
Grant Avenue, where they served the 
people of San Francisco for over sixteen 
years. 

• • 
A daughter was born on Jan. 3 to the 

wife of Wong Hoy Wing, 717^ Sacra- 
mento Street, San Francisco. 

• • 
A daughter was born on Dec. 23 to the 

wife of Chan Low Kwong, 726 Jackson 
Street, San Francisco. 



EL PASO CHINESE 

El Paso, Texas — The Chinese Students 
Club is proud that one of the aims of 
the club, to aid the poor and needy 
Chinese of that city is being fulfilled. 
Members of the club ask for donations 
in foodstuffs from Chinese grocery stores, 
and call for them the following day in 
their cars. Sacks of rice, potatoes, sugar, 
and other essentials have been gener- 
ously and willingly donated by the mer- 
chants. 

• • 

BASKETBALL AT Y. W. C. A. 

Requests for basketball have been so 
numerous that the Y. W. C. A. announ- 
ces that beginning Monday, Jan. 27, at 
8:00 p. m. the gymnasium and a qualified 
coach will be available to all girls and 
young women who are interested in ac- 
tive sports. The only requirement is 
that each girl who registers for the group 
must either present a health certificate or 
take a health examination. This mea- 
sure is a precaution against possible 
harm which may result from engaging 
in exercise which is too strenuous for the 
particular individual. Arrangements for 
physical examinations may be made at 
the Chinese Y. W. C. A. at any time be- 
tween now and the opening date. High 
school girls may have their health records 
transferred from high school physical 
education departments. 
• • 

Chinese Win Offices 
Two Chinese girl students of the Fran- 
cisco Junior High School were elected 
officers of the Associated Student Body 
Association. They are Bertha Jann and 
Viola Joe. Bertha was chosen by her 
fellow-students as treasurer, while Viola 
won the girls' yell leader post. Vincent 
Gunn, candidate for president, lost by a 
margin of 13 votes. More than a thou- 
sand votes were cast for each post. 



5 &£±Ji£>-**£FS> 6v^C£L*sS?> GC^&^sZFSi G 



i 



9 



9 



FLORISTS 

• 

Bridal Bouquets, Corsages, 

Wreaths - - Funeral Decorations 

Ask For 

FRANK YOUNG 

• 

120 Maiden Lane - - SUtter 2300 

san francisco, california 

•>' 5f?^S5-"v2£ <°£?^<zr^£> <S£^<£r<3£> £ 

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& 



Y. W. C. A. PICTURE SHOWN 

Through the courtesy of the San Fran- 
cisco Conservatory of Music, an illu- 
strated talk was given at the Chinese Y. 
W. C. A. last Monday night. Scenic 
pictures of Russia, Germany, France and 
other European countries were shown, 
which proved very interesting. 

A crowd of approximately three hun- 
dred enthusiastic students witnessed the 
showing of a picture at the Chinese 
Middle School audience last Sunday 
evening. Interesting scenes of Winter 
snow and inside facts of how ice is cut 
by modern machinery provided an hour's 
enjoyment. The picture was shown 
through the courtesy of the Northern 
Pacific Railway Company. 

• • 

PATRIOTIC SOCIETY 

A picture was shown at the Mandarin 
Theater last week by the Chinese patri- 
otic Society of San Francisco, through 
ohe courtesy of the Grand View Film 
Company. Adults and students from 
the various Chinese schools attended the 
showing. 

Proceeds are to go toward funds for 
patriotic movements. 

• • 

OAKLAND CHINESE ATTACKED _ 
Louie Yee Soon, fifty-seven year old 
Chinese of 638 Webster Street, Oakland, 
was brutally attacked by two unknown 
persons at midnight last Saturday. Rush- 
ed to the Alameda County Hospital, 
physicians found that he suffered a frac- 
tured skull. Police are still on the look- 
out for the attackers. 

• • 

Y. W. C. A. RECREATION CLASSES 
"All work and no play makes Jack 
a dull boy" is an old adage, but age has 
not dulled the edge of its truthfulness. 
This is particularly true of the children 
of the Chinese community who carry the 
double burden of Chinese and American 
school. For this reason, the Chinese Y. 
W. C. A. is continuing its policy of 
offering recreation for girls between six 
and fourteen on Saturday afternoons. 
For girls under nine the program in- 
cludes games and rhythm exercises from 
12:30 until 1:15 and stories and simple 
crafts from 1:15 until 2:00. The older 
girls are planning to dramatize a fairy 
tale during the 12:30 to 1:15 period. 
From that time until 2:00 they may 
choose either tap dancing or crafts for 
their activity. 

The Saturday Recreation classes are 
open to all girls under fourteen without 
fee. 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17, 1936 



The 

Semi-Annual 
Sale Event 

starts this week at Berger's, 
featuring our Exclusive 

Stock of 

TOWNSTER SUITS 

and OVERCOATS 




CHINATOWNIA 



in a full assortment of 

sizes, models, fabrics and 

colors, at drastic reductions 

$19-75 

$26.75 
$36.75 

Now is your opportunity 

to replenish your wardrobe 

at Berger's, noted for 

Quality, Fit and Style. 

Please call and consult 

TONG FIVE 

Chinese Sales Representative 




tfi&S 



c/ f 856 Market Street 
Fashion Park Clothiers 



Crusader Club Enjoys 
Yosemite Trip 

The Crusader Club of Oakland recent- 
ly returned from a four-day excursion to 
Yosemite National Park where they par- 
ticipated in the winter snow sports. This 
event climaxed a successful season in the 
1935 program of the organization. The 
trip was thoroughly enjoyed by each 
member. 

Those who took this delightful sojourn 
were: Mr. Loyd L. Lee, counselor of the 
club, Mrs. Ella Young, Misses {Catherine 
Jung, Gertrude Young, Winona Young, 
Bertha Lew, Jane Fong, Gladys Low, Bet- 
ty Ann Tarn, Luella Young, and Messrs. 
Louis Chan, Stephen Lee, Raymond Chan, 
Godwyn Jung, Chester Fong, William 
Low, Richard Lum, Paul Fong, Wesley 
Jung, Lawrence Low and Bruce Quan. 

The club is making plans for a num- 
ber of excursions for this year. 

• • 

Salinas Chinese to Organize 

A movement is under way for the 
formation of the Salinas Chinese Club. 
Several boys, including James Leong, 
George Young and Edward Chan are 
working hard to organize the Chinese 
youths of that city. 

A basketball contest is soon to be sche- 
duled by Frank Chin and Diamond Yee 
with the Watsonville Chinese, Monterey, 
and other cage teams. 

• • 
STOCKTON NING YUNG ELECT 

The Ning Yung Association of Stock- 
ton elected a new set of officers, which 
assumed office Jan. 5 for the new year. 
Wong Yuen Jeung was chosen president; 
Fong Cheung, vice-president; Fong 
Kwong Hoy and Fong Horn Som, Chi- 
nese secretaries; Mar Kay and Hong 
Gum Seung, English secretaries. 

• • 
STUDENTS MEET 

Fifty representatives and students from 
ten universities and colleges will meet in 
Los Angeles on the North China Crisis, 
it was reported to the Chinese Digest by 
Lim P. Lee, University of Southern Cali- 
fornia student. 

• • 

Seattle, Wash. — The local Chinese Six 
Companies elected their officers for 1936. 
Results: president, Ong See Chuen; vice- 
president, Chan Joek Mun; Chinese se- 
cretary, Woo Quen and Yee Wo Kang; 
and English secretary, Lau Gat Kay and 
Wong June Yuen. 



Anna May Wong to 
Study for Stage 

Chinese roles in American pictures are 
so far and few between that Anna May 
Wong has decided to study for the Chi- 
nese stage, under the tutelage of the fam- 
ous actor, Dr. Mei Lan Fang. 

Miss Wong is preparing for her trip 
to China, where she will study the Man- 
darin dialect, with hopes of success on 
the Chinese stage in Hongkong, Shang- 
hai and other cities, where she is well- 
known. 

The first wife of Miss Wong's father 
and their children are living in China 
and she will meet them for the first time. 
• • 

Pan-American Airways 
Hires Chinese Cooks 

Ten Chinese cooks will leave on the 
6000 ton freighter SS North Haven 
when it leaves this week for Midway, 
Wake, and Guam Islands, this time to 
bear a huge construction crew of over 
100 men and 6000 tons of freight. On 
these islands, hotels, completely equipped 
with baths and hot and cold running 
water, and other up-to-the-minute equip- 
ment of modern hotels will be put up. 

The Chinese cooks will be located in 
each of the islands and cook for both 
passengers and crew upon the establish- 
ment of these hotels. 

According to plans, it is estimated that 
the work of the expedition will be com- 
pleted and the ship will return to San 
Francisco in approximately four months, 
cruising to each of the islands to unload 
freight, and finally to reach Manila be- 
fore starting back. 

• • 

AUTHOR OF "GOOD EARTH" 
WINS NEW HONOR 

Pearl S. Buck's fictional epic of the 
soil, "The Good Earth", which won the 
Pulitzer prize in 1931, recently won for 
its author new laurels. She has been 
awarded the Howells Medal, which is 
given away every fifth year by the Ameri- 
can Academy of Arts and Letters for 
the most distinguished fiction bv an A- 
merican author published during that 
period. 

On the heels of this new honor came 
the publication of Mrs. Buck's newest 
novel, "The Exile", the story of an Amer- 
ican Protestant woman missionary in 
China. The story is fashioned from the 
life of the author's mother. 



Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Mak^e This a Bigger and Better Paper 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 5 



CHINATOWNIA 



CHINESE GUESTS OF 
ARMY OFFICERS 

Two prominent Chinese were guests of 
honor of the Reserved Officers Associa- 
tion meeting in Oakland last Tuesday. 
They were Hon. Chao-Chin Huang, 
Consul General of San Francisco, and 
Dr. Chang W. Lee, dentist and Lieu- 
tenant in the United States Army Re- 
serve Force. With them was Major G. 
C. Ringole, friend and advisor to the 
Cathay Post. 

Hon. Chao-Chin Huang, the main 
speaker, gave a survey of the military 
situation in China. "In the past, the 
Chinese have laid emphasis on the Art 
of Peace. Now, under external pressure, 
she is building an efficient fighting ma- 
chine. She has recently acquired a 
strong air force, and her soldiers are 
receiving modern training and equip- 
ment." 

Major G. C. Ringole stated that under 
proper conditions the Chinese makes the 
best soldier in the world. "The men 
fight with indifference to personal dis- 
comfort, adverse situation, or danger. 
The leaders are born psychologists and 
skillful strategists." 

Dr. Chang W. Lee gave a brief out- 
line of the activities of the Cathay Post. 
"The members are active helping the 
disabled veterans. Locally, they make 
it their business to promote good citi- 
zenship." 

• • 

Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION 

The Chinese Y. M. C. A will hold a 
Membership Reception on Jan. 17, a 
meeting in honor of new members who 
joined during the recent campaign. 

The public is welcome, and the pro- 
gram will include motion piotures, other 
entertainment, and awarding of prizes 
to the winning team of the contest. 
Gen. Ting Hsiu Tu will present the 
awards as a personal gift. Consul-Gen- 
eral Huang, G. B. Lau, president of 
the "Y" pool, to see if the water is as 
cretary, will take active part in the pro- 
gram. 



ALFRED B. CHONC 

INSURANCE 

Kansas City Life Insurance Co. 

Office SUtter 2995; Res. PRospect 8135 

111 Sutter St., San Francisco 



A DREAM COME TRUE 

For many years John F. Stahl, recent- 
ly retired postal worker, had nourished 
a dream that "one of these days" he 
would be able to make a trip to the Far 
East, to see the Orient's teeming millions, 
to drink in the colorful, mysterious, and 
exotic sights of Japan, China, and India. 
All his life he had lived in his own coun- 
try, and while he worked at his liveli- 
hood the years had flown by like an 
arrow in full flight. He wanted to see 
the East before his eyes had grown too 
dim so that he may judge for himself 
the glory and the beauty of far-off coun- 
tries which had become ancient even be- 
fore America was discovered. 

John Stahl's desire to see the East, 
especially China, grew out of many years 
of intimate friendship with the Chinese 
in this city. For many years he and his 
wife had lived close to Chinatown. Many 
years ago both of them had taught young 
Chinese immigrants the rudiments of the 
English tongue in a mission school and 
had thus come to know many of China- 
town's inhabitants. They liked and ad- 
mired the Chinese and their friendship 
for them was reciprocated. 

So one night Saint Nicholas dropped 
a special present into Mr. Stahl's Christ- 
mas stocking. And when the owner of 
the stocking pulled out its contents the 
next morning he found a ticket for a 
three months' cruise to the Far East! 

Great, therefore, was the joy of the 
man who had dreamt for years of just 
such a trip. To Japan, land of the 
cherry blossoms; Shanghai, Paris of the 
Far East; Hong Kong, busiest seaport 
of South China; Manila, capital of the 
new Philippine commonwealth; and Sai- 
gon, exotic city of French Indo-China! 
All these places, each with splendors and 
beauty and romance all its own, John 
Stahl was to see. Oh, blessed Saint 
Nicholas! 

John Stahl's ticket was for a cargo 
cruise, a new mode of leisurely travel 
now popular with American travelers who 
had grown tired of the monotony of 
well-ordered and luxurious ocean liners. 

So that very Saturday John Stahl 
sailed away on his trip which still seemed 
to him like a dream from which he had 
not awakened. The 13,000-ton ship on 
which he sailed bore a name strangely 
appropriate to close this story of a man 



PROGRESS NOTED IN CHINESE 
DIPLOMATIC SERVICE 

Considerable progress has been noted 
in the Chinese diplomatic service as a 
result of the introduction of scientific 
management and administration efficien- 
cy by the Waichiaopu, according to a 
spokesman of the foreign office. 

While China had only ten ministers 
in 1931, said the spokesman, she is now 
represented by six ambassadors and 15 
ministers in foreign lands. 

Rigid measures have also been enforced 
in the appointment, promotion, degrada- 
tion and transfer of the Chinese diplo- 
matic officials. During the past three 
years, for instance, two examinations 
have been held by the Waichiaopu check- 
ing the efficiency and competency of the 
Chinese consular representatives. 

As a means to acquaint the diplomatic 
officials, who have seen service in foreign 
countries for a number of years, with 
the latest Chinese conditions, the Wai- 
chiaopu has also embarked on a policy 
of transferring them back to the foreign 
office for an indefinite term prior to 
sending them out again, the spokesman 
said. 

Improvements have also been made in 
the straightening out of the expenses of 
Chinese embassies, legations, consulate- 
generals and consulates abroad. Con- 
trasting the conditions in 1932, when 
financial stringency compelled the foreign, 
office to slash down the budgets of the 
legations and consulates, remittances to 
them have been made promptly and re- 
gularly since 193 3. The plan to in- 
crease the budgets of the Chinese diplo- 
matic service abroad has also been grad- 
ually carried out since last year, accord- 
ing to the spokesman. 

• • 

whose dream came true. That name 
conjured up such an aura of romance 
about it that were not this story a true 
one, one would have suspected that Jo- 
seph Conrad had plotted this tale. 

The name of the ship? It was called 
the "Golden Dragon". 



HOWARD MACEE 

COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 

• 
EXbrook 0298 Sen Francisco 

Anglo Bank Bldg. - 830 Market St 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17. 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



CHINESE MOVIE STAR MARRIED 

Climaxing a romance of five years, 
Butterfly Wu, China's foremost motion 
picture actress and darling of the movie 
fans, married Eugene Penn, well-known 
Chinese business man, in Shanghai. 

The wedding was one of the most 
elaborate affairs ever witnessed. Over 
2000 guests were invited to the dinner 
and reception at Shanghai's two largest 
Chinese hotels. 

• 
A son was born on Dec. 3 1 to the wife 

of Joseph Jee Chong, 805 Howard St., 

San Francisco. 



SECRET MARRIAGE REVEALED 

James M. Loo, manager of the Ma- 
jestic Paste Company, and Clara Sui of 
Berkeley were secretly married several 
months ago, it was revealed, in Reno, 
Nevada. Surprising his many friends, 
he gave a dinner-dance at the New 
Shanghai Cafe last Sunday evening. Mr. 
and Mrs. Loo plan to go to either Salt 
Lake Ci:y or San Diego for their honey- 
moon. At present, the couple is living 
in San Francisco. 




VARIETY 
UNLIMITED! 

Every shoe in our stock, every style in our 
store, temporarily reduced for this short- 
time semi-annual event. And remem- 
ber, nothing is changed but the price. 

FLOKSHEIM 



756 Market St. 
San Francisco 



680 Market St. 



120 Powell St. 
California 



Allee, the Towntrotter, says: 

ALLEE, The TOWNTROTTER, gives 
you this week's chatter: Bravo for 
NGOW DOO WAH, he's a man with 
lots of guts an' truck loads of 'em .... 
he sells 'em at Waverly Place . . . .Mother 
nature provides HENRY OW YOUNG 
with a pair of dreamy eyes (My, my) 
.... ARTHUR ENG is doing well in 
Oakland, working at the Cut-Rate Drug 
company .... one of our heavy-sets, 
HARRY LUM weighs only 200 pounds, 
smokes cigars an' has the nicest, rosy 
cheeks .... HOWARD LOW and 'MA 
KAY' are still palsy-walsys .... WONG 
ah JUNE, where were you the night of 
January 12? ... . Cupid in Chinatown: 
EDITH CHAN and ALBERT LEW 
announce their intentions (wont be 
long!) .... DICKIE LEONG and a 
'pretty Miss Louie' are frequently seen 
together .... "MUN" Wong and 
GLADYS CHINN are lunching together 
these days .... that handsome chap 
JOHN YIP has all the requirements, 
the gals claim! (next to Franchot Tone?) 
.... Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer will spot 
only three Occidental players in "Good 
Earth" .... WILLIAM LEE is in the 
wholesale florist business in San Mateo 
. . FONG-FONG has been receiving 
several orders for Chinese Wedding 
Cakes (Well, well an' well) .... recently 
Mr. Stork brought a son to the HAROLD 
LEONS and that makes three .... 
do you know that: DAVID SUI attends 
Heald College .... that JADIN WONG 
is temperamental and will be the guest 
star at the coming Chitena dance .... 
that SON LOY CHAN of the FAN- 
CHON and MARCO IDEA will enter- 
tain, too ... . that BETTY WON also 
will sing for the Chinese New Year's 
struggle .... that HENRY K. WONG 
lost his camera and overcoat the other 
day (G-Men wanted) .... chat CARO- 
LINE FONG may go to continuation 
school 'to kill time' .... that GRACE 
SUN moved from the YW to an ex- 
clusive apartment .... that LOLA 
CHOYE is a great swimmer and doing 
all her wiggle-waggles at the YM swim- 
ming tub .... that's that . . . So Long! 

• 
Sacramento. Calif. — Chinese Six Com- 
panies election results are: president, 
Fong You Foo: vice-president, Louie 
Yee Chong; Chinese secretary. Fong 
Jong Louie and Quock Wav Sing: and 
English secretary, Fong Ging Wah and 
Yee Wye Duck. 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 7 



TEA AN D LANTERNS 



"965" Club 

Plans for the late winter and early 
spring program of the "965" Club are 
under way. Among the activities which 
this group of young business and indus- 
trial girls is offering for its members 
and other young women is a class in tap 
dancing which will begin on Tuesday, 
January 28, 8:00-8:45 p. m. each week 
until the end of March. Registration 
for the class will close on January 28. 
Health examinations, which are a re- 
quirement for entrance into the Y. W. 
C. A. gym and dancing classes, may be 
arranged for before that time. The fee 
for health examination and class instruc- 
tion is seventy-five cents for the ten 
week term. 

The "965" Club is part of the Busi- 
ness and Industrial Department of the 
Y. W. C. A. and is affiliated with the 
city-wide Business Girls' Committee and 
the Industrial Council of the Y. W. C. A. 



Cathay Club Elections 

Cathay Club held its annual election 
on Jan. 10, with the following results: 
president, Andrew P. Sue; vice president, 
Dere Sheck; secretary, Herbert J. Haim; 
treasurer, Norman D. Chinn; financial 
secretary, King W. Lee; custodian of 
property, Ernest M. Loo; sergeant-at- 
arms, Frank S. Quon; athletic manager, 
Thomas C. Tong; social chairman, 
Franklin H, Chan; musical director, 
Thomas L. Lym. 

Those elected on the board of direc- 
tors were: Frank S. Quon, Thomas Y. 
Kwan, Chester Look, Dere Sheck, Nor- 
man D. Chinn, Herbert J. Haim, Frank- 
lin H. Chan, King W. Lee, Francis H. 
Louie, Thomas L. Lym, and Andrew P. 
Sue. 

President Sue stated that the outlook 
for the coming year was extremely bright 
and with the support of members, prom- 
ised to make it an active one. Following 
the election, a dinner was held at Sun 
Hung Heong Cafe. 



AWARD DANCE 

Wah Ying Club will sponsor an Award 
Dance on Saturday, Feb. 29 at the N. 
S. G. S. Hall, it was announced by the 
social committee yesterday. Trophies, 
medals and ribbons will be awarded to 
the Bay Region Basketball Tournament 
champions, runner-up and the All-Stars. 



Chitena Dance Next Week 

Stage and night club entertainers and 
celebrities will be present at the Chitena's 
Chinese New Year's Dance on Jan. 24, 
according to H. K. Wong, chairman of 
tht dance. Music will be furnished by 
the Cathayans' orchestra. 

Valuable prizes will be donated by 
Fong-Fong, Knox Coffee Shop, Hall's 
Sport Shop, New Pacific Garage, Young 
Kee Radio Shop, Jing Loy Co., Shang- 
tai Coffee Shop, Earl Louie, and Fred 
Mar. 

• • 
JUNG- DONG WEDDING 

Won Dong, daughter of Dong Sin 
Shek, prominent local Chinese, and 
Jung Ball, son of Jung Foon Yoke, of 
Tucson, Arizona, held their wedding 
banquet last week at the Hang Far Low. 
Relatives and friends of the two families 
attended the affair. Mr. Jung will short- 
ly return to Tucson with his bride, where 
they will take up their residence. 

• • 

Y. W. C. A. PROGRAM 

On Saturday, January 18, at 7:30 p. m. 
the Chinese Y. W. C. A. will present its 
Spring Program of music, songs, dan- 
cing, and Chinese plays. All members 
and their friends are cordially invited 
to attend. 

• • 

COMMERCE GRADS 

Eight Chinese students are among the 
graduating class at the High School of 
Commerce. They are: Robert Eng, Tim 
Lee, Tom Kay Chong, Marion Look, 
Bella Fong, John Chan, Margaret Quon 
and Lena Way. Graduation exercises 
will be held at the school auditorium on 
Jan. 17. 

• • 

"Y" DANCE 

In conjunction with the workers of 
the "Y", the Young Men's Christian 
Association Boys' Work Committee is giv- 
ing an invitational dance on Jan. 17 in 
the Boys' Lobby of the Chinese Y. M. 
C. A. 



CHITENA 

NEW YEAR'S DANCE 

Dancing 'Til One 
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24 

N.S.G.S. Hall 
Guest Stars - - Door Prizes 

MUSIC BY THE CATHAYANS 



9. 



YOKE CHOY CLUB FORMAL 

The Yoke Choy Club will celebrate 
its fifteenth anniversary with a dinner- 
dance in the Italian Room of the St. 
Francis Hotel on February 8. The affair 
is to be an invitational formal, with 
dinner at seven and dancing slated to 
start at nine. Out of town members 
who have not received notice are asked 
to take note and be present. For further 
details communicate with Dr. Theodore 
C. Lee or Yee Wong. 

• • 

Young Chinese Party 

Oakland's Young Chinese Athletic 
Club held a gay party recently at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Wong. 
Over forty persons, including many girls 
of the Waku Auxiliary Juniors, attended. 

Among the girls present were: Jane 
Quan, Marguerite Lun, Stella Lew, An- 
nie Jung, Fanny Tom, Ruth Chew, Jane 
Lowe, Violet and Lilac Quan, Dolly 
Wong, Gladys Lew, Ramona Lien, Eva 
Woo, Elizabeth Lee, Margaret Tom, Ger- 
trude and Winona Young and Gladys 
Lowe. 

• • 
BIRTHDAY PARTY 

Miss Alice Chew celebrated her birth- 
day at a party last Saturday at the home 
of Miss Flora Chan. Especially enjoy- 
able dance music was furnished by the 
Hawaiian String Orchestra. 

Among those present were: Misses 
Flora Chan, Clara Chan, Virginia Quon, 
May Gunn, Rose Young, Lily Yip, Es- 
ther Chew, Rachel Lee and Messrs. 
Bam T. Lee, Willie Wong, Jimmy Chinn, 
Bill Wong, Herbert Lee, Andrew Yuke, 
Albert Lee, Harold Lai, Andrew Wong, 
Herbert Lowe, Othel Mammon, Fred 
Chin and Woodrow Ong. 

• • 

HERE'S A YARN OR TWO 

Mrs. Mary Gong has announced that 
she will conduct a free knitting class for 
the benefit of those who are interested 
in learning this art. The class will be 
held in the Chinese Catholic Social Cen- 
ter, and lessons are given each afternoon 
except Sunday, from one to four. 

During the past year Mrs. Gong has 
assisted in conducting a Saturday after- 
noon sewing class at the Center which 
at present has 40 enthusiastic pupils. 

• • 

A son was born on Dec. 15 to the wife 
of Harold Leon, 826 Jackson Street, 
San Francisco. 



Page 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17, 1936 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



Ceramic Art 



(VIII) Elimination of Spurs — 
Early Sung. 

Spur marks are really blemishes and 
are especially objectionable if they are 
located on the mouth rims of cups or 
bowls for then, not only does their pre- 
sence mar the wares conspicuously, but 
it is the mouth rim which comes in con- 
tact with the lips of the user. Even on 
the base, spurs are objectionable, for 
unless completely removed, the vessels 
would be resting unevenly on spur adhe- 
sions instead of the base itself. 

Methods Sought for Elimination 

At a very early date, potters were busy 
seeking methods to eliminate the spur 
marks from their wares. Changes be- 
came apparent during the T'ang Dyna- 
sty, but it was the Sung potters who did 
the greatest amount of experimentation. 
Many factories of historic importance 
were established. Some of the classic 
potters include the makers of the Chun, 
Ting, Lung Ch'uan, Ko, Chien, Tz'u, 
and the various Kuan wares. (In the 
absence of any extended written work on 
this interesting aspect of Chinese cera- 
mics, this series on spur marks, arrived 
at through the study of such specimens 
as were within the writer's reach, is offer- 
ed as tentative conclusions pending fur- 
ther study and excavations of kiln sites) . 

Most T'ang potters apparently solved 
this problem by having the glaze fall 
short of the base. Seldom do biscuits 
adhere to each other, and in case they 
do, a little grinding will eliminate the 
adhesion marks without seriously marring 
the appearance. The practice of having 
the decoration stop short of the base was, 
however, not a T'ang innovation; for 
aneolithic Yang Shao Period ware was 
often similarly decorated, though for 
other reasons. Where a glazed base was 
desired, the T'ang potters again resorted 
to the inverted firing, and the spur marks 
may then be found on the mouth rim. 
This practice is still used by some modern 
potters. 

Spurs on the Foot Rim 

Meanwhile the Sung potters had 
achieved the foot rim, replacing the flat 
base typical of earlier times. The Tz'u 
Chou potters, specialists of carved and 
painted slip wares, followed the T'ang 
practice of having the glaze fall short 
of the base, but where stacking was re- 
sorted to. the spurs were placed on the 
pAcp of the foot rim instead of the base. 
Generally, five rather heavy spurs are 

Patronize Our 



Remember When? 

Remember when young men and wo- 
men were never seen together on the 
streets of Chinatown? Remember when 
engaged girls were supposed to be incon- 
spicuous — at least until after the wed- 
ding? 

Outside of Chinatown, bold lovers 
would frequently walk together "Ameri- 
can fashion". And if caught, there 
would be a month's Winchelling in the 
offing. And if any were caught experi- 
menting with that peculiar Western ha- 
bit called osculation — why, some reform- 
ers even posted a white sermon (pok 
cheung tzu) deploring the fact that par- 
ents were neglecting their jobs and hint- 
ing that the younger generation had 
"gone native". 

Even as late as 1910, when the bold 
experiment of "spooning" along Dupont 
Street (generally immediately after 
school, and always in droves) business 
would be momentarily at a standstill, 
and there would be a lot of necking — on 
the part of the giggling spectators. 

When did you first parade with your 
"Breath of the Gods"? What were some 
of the comments heard? 

(Second of a series of 52 recordings 
of sociological and cultural changes tak- 
ing place in Chinatown within a genera- 
tion. Send in your observations.) 

used by the Tz'u Chou potters. 

The Chun potters "hid" their spurs 
inside the foot rim, and this technique 
was adopted by the early Lung Ch'uan, 
Ko, Ju, and possibly Ting potters. For 
heavy wares such as flower pots, the Chun 
potters used as many as twenty-one spurs, 
leaving a ring of nail-like marks on the 
area inside the foot rim. 

Copyrighted. 1936. by Chingwah Lee 

(Next Week: Elimination of Spur 
Marks — Ring and Sand.) 
• • 



G 



T A O YUAN 

RESTAURANT 

* 

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Between Grant and Stockton 

Meals Unsurpassed in ¥} 
Chinatown jg 

Also Wines and Liquors Di 

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Chinese Inventions and 
Discoveries 

(VII) The Chinese Invented All the 
Chief Varieties of Paper. 

Since 105 A. D., when paper was offi- 
cially reported to the emperor by one 
Ts'ai Lun, a court eunuch, the Chinese 
have experimented and utilized all the 
important ingredients of modern paper, 
including rags, hemps, wood, cellulose, 
bark, straw, silk, bamboo, and various 
plant fibers. According to Dr. Francis 
Carter of Columbia, there are no inven- 
tions which leave China as fully and as 
completely developed as paper. 

As to type there is first of all, the plain 
wrapping paper, made chiefly with long 
plant fibers to increase durability. Asso- 
ciated with this is card board (tzu pok) 
where stiffness is the chief consideration. 
A tougher variety is developed as leather 
substitute for trunks and slippers. 

Of the finer papers there is the "cur- 
tain" (transparent) paper or sa tzu and 
wax paper or lop tzu. There are many- 
varieties of loaded and sized paper and 
colored glazed paper, some being treated 
on one side only. 

Then there is fancy paper specked with 
gold or silver flakings, stamped with 
geometric designs, or painted with scenes. 
There are also gold foil and silver foil 
coated paper; and a heavy lead foil 
coated paper was made for lining tea 
boxes. These boxes, by the way, are also 
covered on the outside with a thin water- 
proof paper. There are "bamboo" pa- 
per (chuk tzu) where long fibers are 
featured, and "rice" paper (no rice used) 
displaying a fine powdery surface. 

As to usages, there is developed paper 
napkins, paper dishes, wall paper, toilet 
paper, leather substitutes, paper fuses, pa- 
per screens, and translucent, waterproof 
paper for lanterns, umbrellas, and win- 
dows. There is also silk-backed paper 
for painting and cloth-backed paper for 
wrapping medicine. There are also pa- 
per squares loaded with lip rouges. 

The Chinese have no blotting paper, 
but that is because thev had already 
developed a "self-blotting" paper, ideal- 
ly suited for use with the Chinese pen 
which is really a brush. A softer form 
of this paper, called yu kau tzu is used 
for making sanitary napkins. Even as 
late as the nineteenth century. China was 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Taper 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 9 



CHINESE LORE — CONFUC I US 



By Dr. Henry H. Hart 

The last half of the sixth and the first 
half of the fifth centuries B. C. wit- 
nessed the appearance in both Europe 
and Asia of a group of mighty intellects 
whidh has never been surpassed at any 
other period in wisdom or power. The 
contribution and influence of these men 
have been paramount in the field of 
ethics, religion, and philosophy through 
the centuries down to our own time. In 
this group we find Socrates, Plato, 
Isaiah, the Buddha, Lao Tzu and Con- 
fucius. 

There are various ways by which we 
may measure the greatness of a world 
figure. If it be based on the number of 
people influenced, the number of years 
or centuries during Which the influence 
has been exerted and the profundity of 
the influence, it would be no exaggera- 
tion to say that Confucius is among the 
ten greatest men who have ever lived. 

His ideas and teachings have influ- 
enced over a quarter of the human race, 
and for a period of 2500 years. If we 
measure is contribution by the profund- 
ity of his influence, then he is surely at 
the forefront of the great. Much of the 
ethical, social, and political life of the 
Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Indo- 
Chinese peoples has been regulated to 
the smallest detail by the teachings and 
maxims of Confucius ever since his death 
in 479 B. C. 
A SYSTEM OF ETHICS 

Strictly speaking, Confucianism is not 
a religion. It is a system of ethics based 
on the Golden Rule. "Do not do unto 
others what you would not have them do 
unto you" was the form in which the 
rule was given to the Chinese. 

Confucius enunciated as the basis of 
his ethical teaching that the universe is 
governed by righteousness, morality and 
integrity, and that humanity should and 
must conform to these great immutable 
laws. 

HUMAN RELATIONS 

He divided all human relations into 
five groups — the relation of husband 
and wife, of parent and child, of a man 
and his neighbor, of brother and broth- 
er, and of ruler and subject. He taught 
that in all these fundamental relation- 
ships righteousness should prevail. The 
superior man, the highest type of human 
being, and the man who should be sought 
as the leader in public and private life 
is the man who is a model of integrity 
and uprightness in all his dealings with 
his fellows. 



Confucius was once asked if he could 
express his teachings in one word. "That 
is simple,' he answered. "The word is 
'reciprocity,' for if we would act toward 
our fellow man as we would want him 
to act toward us, the problems of the 
world would be solved.' And this an- 
swer is as valid for us in our sorely trou- 
bled world of today as it was for the peo- 
ple of the Chinese State of Lu, 2500 
years ago. 
HIS LATER LIFE 

The career of Confucius was an un- 
happy one, and he considered himself 
largely a failure. His private life was 
rather stormy, and his efforts to reform 
the state were unsuccessful. He never 
realized that his informal discussions on 
human relations, politics and history 
were destined to give a whole race its 
code of private and public ethics for 
over 2,000 years. 

He was a petty office-holder who wan- 
dered from State to State, trying to 
teach the rulers and officials integrity and 
righteousness. Once he almost succeeded 
with Duke Ting of the State of Lu, but 
the jealous ruler of a rival State sent 
a present of eighty beautiful dancing 
girls. After chat His Royal Highness 
had no further time for the mpral dis- 
courses of Confucius. So he wandered 
again, finally returning to his home in 
what is now the Province of Shantung, 
at the age of fifty-seven. There he passed 
the remaining years of his life compiling 
and editing five books of poetry and his- 
tory. These are the books known to the 
Chinese as the "Five Classics." 

He spent his spare time discussing 
ethics and human relations with his dis- 
ciples, of whom he is said to have had 
3000. His method was that of Socrates 
— question and answer, and the bringing 
out of the truth by argument, illustrated 
by current or historical events. The ethi- 
cal principle is often put in the mouth 
of a disciple, who was inevitably driven 
to his conclusion by the sharp questions 
and arguments of his master. 

TEACHINGS 

We know very little of the religious 
beliefs of Confucius. It is certain that 
he accepted and defended ancestor wor- 
ship and the strict observance of the 
ancient rites and ceremonies of his race. 
Once, when he was asked about gods and 
spirits, he answered, "Respect them, but 
hold them at a distance.' At another 
time a student asked him about death, and 
the life after death. He answered sharp- 
ly, "You know but little about life, 
what can you know about death?" and 



the discussion stopped right tJhere. On 
the other hand he once remarked, "If a 
man has lost Heaven, to whom can he 
turn?" 

There are no long chapters of in- 
volved philosophy in the teachings of 
Confucius. His system was taught in 
concise, straight forward, every-day lan- 
guage, so that it could be grasped and 
understood by the simplest mind. Here 
are a few illustrations: 

"Learning without thought is labor 
lost, thought without learning is peril- 
ous." This aphorism might well be con- 
sidered by the world today, where every- 
one claims the right to an opinion on 
everything, but where few will take the 
trouble to study and reflect before ar- 
riving at that opinion. 

"When you know a thing, to know 
that you know it, and when you do not 
know a thing to admit that you do not 
know it — this is wisdom." This is an- 
other of his most famous paragraphs. 

When discussing public office, he said, 
"I am not concerned that I have no 
place. I am concerned how I may fit 
myself for one. I am not concerned that 
I am not known. I seek to be worthy to 
be known." 

In "The Great Learning", one of the 
collections of his conversations, Con- 
fucius lays down a cardinal principle of 
living in two words, which we may trans- 
late in four — -"Know when to stop.' And 
he elaborates on this idea, teaching that 
if one learns moderation and self-con- 
trol in all things, he is master of himself 
and of the world. 

He was a shrewd student of the life 
about him, and referred to many traits 
of character which have not chanced 
since his day. One of his best known 
observations is "Of all people women and 
servants are the most difficult. If you are 
familiar with them they cease to respect 
you. If you are reserved with them they 
resent it." 

Another is "Only the very wisest and 
the very stupidest men never change." 
Thus we find the method of Confucius 
very similar to that of Socrates in Greece 
and of Jesus, five centuries later, in Pal- 
estine. The question and answer, the les- 
son in parable, the statement of universal 
ethical principles in a few simple words 
— these mark the great teachers of man- 
kind. They are akin to the "Wisdom of 
Solomon", to "Ecclesiasticus", to many 
of the "Psalms", and to the "Book of 
Proverbs", all of which have become an 
integral part of our Western cultural in- 
(Continued on Page 17) 



Pa?e 10 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, ?2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, #2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 

STAFF 

CHING WAH LEE Associate Editor 

WILLIAM HOY Associate Editor 

FRED GEORGE WOO Sports 

CLARA CHAN . - .... . Fashions 

ETHEL LUM Community Welfare 

ROBERT G. POON .... .._ Circulation 

GEORGE CHOW __ Advertising 



FOR YOU AND ME 

The Chinese branches of the Y. M. C. A. and the 
Y. W. C. A. are to be congratulated upon their under- 
taking to show motion pictures, educational films, and 
illustrated talks to the community. 

There are so many phases of health, travel, discovery 
and invention with which the older members of the 
community are unfamiliar. And it will be through 
this medium of visualized presentation that they may 
be enlightened. 

Aside from being educational, it serves to provide 
an entertaining evening well spent, and, above all, a 
wholesome relaxation for old and young. 

LAO TZU (604 B. C.) 

I have three precious things which I hold fast and 
prize. The first is gentleness; the second is frugality; 
the third is humility, which keeps me from putting 
myself before others. Be gentle, and you can be bold; 
be frugal, and you can be liberal; avoid putting your- 
self before others, and you can become a leader among 
men. 

The good man is the bad man's teacher; the bad 
man is the material upon which the good man works. 
If the one does not value his teacher, if the other 
does not love his material, then despite their sagacity 
they must go far astray. This is a mystery of great 
import. 

Save Your Back Numbers 

The Chinese Digest is a Chinatown History in the 
making. In time to come, subscribers will have a 
valuable collection of Chinatownia, lores, and cultural 
notes. 

They are easily filed in a 3 ring binder. Write for 
back numbers (we only have a few left) and subscribe, 
now! 



THE EDUCATION OF BRUNO LESSING 

After viewing the International Exhibition of Chinese 
Art at the London Royal Academy, Bruno Lessing, well 
known columnist, made the following statements: 

"A thrill today. And I don't thrill readily. But 
this was more than an exhibition. It was a revelation. 
"I was never impressed by anything artistic about 
the few Chinese I met — I really did very little thinking 
about it. What this exhibition reveals is that, 
without interruption, and without the blare of trum- 
pets, China, for an almost unbroken period of 3,000 
years has produced works of art which not only com- 
pare with those of other lands, but in most cases, 
actually surpass them. 

"A hundred individuals including the King and 
Queen of England, dozens of museums in Europe and 
America and several governments lent rare specimens. 
The finest group is that sent by the Chinese government. 
"The impression that will linger longest in my 
memory is that of a softness and gentleness which per- 
vaded the entire exhibit. Next is that of beautiful 
coloring and of graceful form. 

"I now have a new picture of China. A tremendous 
realm, unwieldy, racked with the pain of internal con- 
flict, poor, weak and at the mercy of hostile neighbors. 
But "sustained and soothed" by a current of grace 
and beauty and refinement which has flowed through 
her being from time immemorial. 

This is the same writer, who, a year ago, writing in 
the same column, stated: "I cannot leave China too 
soon. If she has 400 million people it may just as 
well be four million.'' Mr. Lessing viewed the exhi- 
bition, he said himself, without any art background. 
If he had had a knowledge of painting, or textile, or 
ceramic, or if he were told that, with the exception of 
caligraphy, these works were done, not by celebrated 
artists, but by unknown artisians he would have had 
still another impression. 

IS YOUR NAME ON OUR LIST? 
A list of our endorsers, soon to be published, is 
steadily growing larger. Is your organization on our 
list? We earnestly solicit your aid, not only in being 
one of our endorsers, but also in bringing to us for 
publication, any interesting news of your organization. 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Pa«« 11 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY 



A REVOLUTIONIST AMONG REVOLUTIONISTS 



The re-emergence of "Christian Gen- 
eral" Feng Yu-hsiang into the field of 
active politics, signified by his appoint- 
ment as vice-chairman of the Military 
Affairs Commission, is another one of 
those events which make up for the 
eternal puzzle of Chinese politics. 

To those who have a general know- 
ledge of the present situation in China, 
this move to reinstate the stormy petrel 
of Chinese politics into the good graces 
of Nanking cannot avoid the conclusion 
that it was done to check Feng from 
selling the services of his personal army 
to the anti-Nanking elements in North 
China. Since Feng would not ally him- 
self with Nanking unless he was offered 
a position in keeping with the military 
power which he holds, he was given a 
decisive voice in military affairs second 
to that of Chiang Kai-shek, head of the 
Military Affairs Commission and Premier 
of China. 

What is not so apparent to the gen- 
eral observer is the fact that, in making 
him assistant military overlord of the 
Central Government, General Chiang 
Kai-shek is now in a position to check 
Feng's unpredictable military alliances 
once and for all. As China's most as- 
tute military statesman, General Chiang, 
since the rise of his star in the political 
firmament, has swept and dropped many 
a recalcitrant general who have opposed 
him, and those that were non-coopera- 
tive and not amenable to his overtures 
for alliance with Nanking, he has 
brought under his thumb. 

Hopeful Alliance 

But for more than a decade Chiang 
has not been able to convince the wily 
and ever rebellious Feng that alliance 
with him was the most desirable thing 
for the good of the country. Perhaps 
the Christian General was not as interest- 
ed in the good of his nation as he has 
emphatically declared every time that he 
seceded from one military group and 
allied himself with another faction. 
Nonetheless the fact remains that Feng 
has cast his lot with Nank 
times as he has opposed it 



The ups and downs of a strictly militar- 
istic career extending over more than 
two decades have not brought him the 
political power which he desired, but 
have made him a more or less frustrated 
man. Failing utterly to realize where 
the course of the Chinese Revolution was 
leading to, he had sacrificed the lives of 
thousands of his devoted soldiers playing 
the part of a political opportunist, 
switching from one military power to 
another whenever it was expedient and 
profitable to himself to do so. 

Today, however, Feng's power, mea- 
sured by his army, has considerably 
dwindled. In the heyday of his glory he 
commanded an army of 35,000. Now 
his forces number less than 3,000. Pol- 
itical misfortunes occasioned by the dis- 
trust of his former allies, including 
Chiang Kai-shek, have brought him to 
his present "reduced circumstances." 

In the great game of Chinese politics, 
Feng was rugged individualism personi- 
fied. He is a rebel among revolutionists. 
As a dissenter Feng is without peer in 
the history of modern China. 

Early Career 
The career of Feng Yu-hsiang pro- 
vides a good index of the spirit of mili- 
tarism in China since the establishment 
of the Republic. A native of Anhwei, 
in North China, Feng came of a work- 
ingman's family, and had no education 
in his youth. On reaching manhood 
he joined the Manchu army and became 
a captain stationed in Peking at the time 
that Sun Yat-sen was engineering his 



plans abroad for the imminent overthrow 
of the imperial regime. The Revolution 
got off to a premature start on October 
10, 1911. When it was quite certain 
that the Manchu dynasty would be over- 
thrown, Feng, emulating the example of 
Yuan Shih-kai, then commander in the 
Manchu army, also raised the standard 
of rtvolt and allied himself with Sun 
Yat-sen's republicism. That act was 
Feng's baptism in revolution. 

When military chaos reigned in China 

anking as many during the next few years, due to the 

Kuomintang's inability to marshal forces 



Right now it is being taken for granted for the effective control of the provinces, 



that at last Feng has come to a perman- 
ent alliance with Nanking, and will hence- 
forth exert his influence to advance the 
ideals of the Kuomintang as laid down 
by Dr. Sun Yat-sen. And there is good 
evidence to lend support to this belief. 



Feng, having recruited a small but ade- 
quate force of followers, carved for him- 
self several northern provinces and be- 
came one of the long line of tuchuns who 
were to harass the country for years to 
come. 



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Feng's Conversion 

Sometime during that period Feng 
became a Christian as a result of an 
American missionary's preachings. He 
was fascinated by the quaintness of this 
new religion and its high ideals, some- 
thing which was so vastly different from 
the religious idolatry which he had 
known. The social ideals of the gospels 
fired his simple imagination and he made 
most of his army Christians likewise. Be- 
cause he was the first Chinese militarist 
to accept Christianity his conversion was 
heralded far and wide, and he became 
known as the "Christian General". 

It was at that time also that he mar- 
ried a woman of modern China, who was 
formerly a secretary of the Peking 
Y.W.C.A. and a graduate of the Peking 
Union Women's College. 
His Prowess 

Prior to the Nationalists' Northern 
Punitive Expedition (1926-1928) Feng 
had gained control of at least five north- 
ern provinces, including Chahar, Shensi, 
Suiyuan, Kansu, and Honan, and had 
allied himself with the North's strongest 
militarist, Wu Pei J fu, against the forces 
of the Manchurian Warlord, Chang Tso- 
lin. In one of the bloodiest civil wars 
of modern times, the Fengtien-Chihli war 
(1922) Feng's troops distinguished 
themselves by their calm fearlessness and 
intrepidity. The "Christian General" 
from that time on gained the admiration 
and respect of the masses, and the 
world's press began to notice him rrjore 
and more. 

His Inconsistency 

The years 1926 to 1928 were moment- 
ous times for China, for, with the aid 
of Russian military and political advisers, 
the Cantonese under Chang Kai-shek 
launched their war for the territorial 
unification of the country. To achieve 
their purpose the Cantonese had to dis- 
continued on Page 17) 
• • 

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Page 12 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17, 1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



M E I LUN YUEN 



Mei Lun Yuen, or the "Garden of 
Beautiful Family Relationships" (740 
37th Ave. San Francisco) is the happy 
abode of 18 Chinese babies. These 
children, early deprived of either or 
both of the most fundamental of family 
relationships, that between brother and 
sister and that between parent and child, 
are provided with loving care and Chris- 
tian home life. 

The baby cottage gives boarding care 
for needy Chinese children from one to 
five years of age. The greater number 
of them are half-orphans, while the 
others include foundlings, full orphans, 
children whose mothers are suffering 
from tuberculosis, children who are con- 
valescing from illness, and children from 
disrupted homes. 

Housed in a modernly-equipped home, 
the children are assured adequate growth 
and nourishment through sunshine, pro- 
per diet, and supervised play. Their 
training inculcates good health, desirable 
social habits, and love of nature. 

Resident Staff 

The present resident staff is headed 
by Dr. Bessie Jeung, graduate of Stan- 
ford University. No person more de- 
voted to her work and more willing to 
give of her time and talent can be found 
than this quiet, determined young wo- 
man. Though working under untold 
hardships of inadequate staff and hara- 
ssing routine worries, this able worker 
is patient and unsparing in her efforts. 
Her love for the children helps her to 
overlook the strain of her task and to 
strive steadfastly towards the goal of her 
work, the future welfare of these child- 
ren. 

To assist her are three other Chinese 
women: two nursery helpers and one 
night worker. In addition, the Works 
Progress Administration provides two 
American workers. The services of the 
Chinese staff is semi-voluntary in nature 
since the remuneration they receive is 
small and does not begin to compensate 
them for their long hours and multiple 
duties. 

Desirable Environment 

The employment of Chinese workers 
insures the home a Chinese cultural back- 
ground. Modern Western science is com- 
bined with ancient Chinese civilization 
that these young children may not grow 
up losing sight of their racial origin. 
They are taught to speak their own 



tongue as well as English; they eat Chi- 
nese as well as American food. When 
relatives or friends visit the children, 
they sense a feeling of stability in the 
presence of Chinese workers. They have 
no fear that the children will drift away 
from an appreciation of Chinese family 
life. 

A commendable feature about the 
home is the absence of "institutionalized" 
formality. Although the workers are 
few, yet a definite attempt is made to 
render the place more home-like by giv- 
ing each child individual care. The 
children are never clad in uniforms, and 
their apparel and accessories are selected 




to express the individual personality as 
much as possible. The writer observed 
that even in such an insignificant item 
as the embroidery or design on the bed- 
spreads, this desire for variation is evi- 
dent. 

"Many of these children have no home 
of their own," stated Dr. Jeung, "and 
we wish that this place may be a real 
home to them in every way." She is 
undertaking psychological studies of each 
child and is particularly interested in a 
few "problem" children. Irregularities 
in behavior are carefully observed and 
studied for underlying physical or men- 
tal causes in order that the child may 
be "given the benefit of the doubt, and 
not be wrongly reprimanded", according 
to Miss Jeung. 

History of the Home 

To understand how such a baby home 
came into being, the reader will be in- 
terested to trace the history of Mei Lun 
Yuen. The home owes its existence 
chiefly to the persistent efforts of that 
great pioneer in Chinese social welfare, 
Miss Donaldina Camp-on. Since the ear- 
ly days of the founding of the Chinese 
Presbyterian Mission Home at 920 Sac- 



ramento Street, it has been necessary to 
make accomodations for babies, orphan- 
ed or abandoned. The Presbyterian 
Board of National Missions, under which 
the Mission Home operates, was willing 
that a small number of children be shel- 
tered there, provided there was a trained 
nurse to give them appropriate care. 

In 1922, the Presbyterian Board 
bought a cottage in East Oakland, neigh- 
boring the Ming Quong Home (then 
known as the Tooker Home). With a 
trained worker and voluntary help from 
Ming Quong Home, the 8 to 14 children 
were adequately cared for. 

Difficulties Encountered 
When the new Ming Quong Home 
was finished in 1925, this baby cottage 
had to be sold. The babies were moved 
to the annex of the new Home, an in- 
firmary built through funds donated en- 
tirely by the Chinese in this country. 
Although the infirmary was no place to 
house a group of babies, it was the only 
quarters available at the time. When 
representatives from the California Child 
Welfare Association visited Ming Quong 
Home, they declared that the infirmary 
must be kept vacant for emergencies and 
epidemics. 

Prior to 1925, several American 
friends, hearing of the need of a home 
for these Chinese children, generously 
contributed towards the building of such 
a baby cottage: Mrs. Milton Stewart of 
Pasadena and Mrs. David B. Gamble 
of Pasadena each gave #5,000; Mr. Hor- 
ace Coleman of Philadelphia (secured 
through the efforts of Miss Tien Fu 
Wu, a great lover of children) #1,000, 
and Miss Julia Huggins of Pasadena 
#500. With this sum as a start. Miss 
Cameron and her enthusiastic helpers 
began drawing plans for the cottage. 
Miss Edna R. Voss. a secretary for the 
Presbyterian Board of National Missions 
in New York, who was then making a 
study of the Board's work among women 
and children on the Pacific Coast (192~). 
wfis asked to present the plans to the 
New York Board. Whereupon, the 
Board decided that it is not its primary 
function to provide for homeless child- 
ren, that such should be considered a 
local civic problem. 

The hope for a baby home, therefore, 
was for the time abandoned. There «.!>■ 
nothing to do but to vacate the infirmary. 
(Continued on Paiie 14) 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 13 



FASHIONS 



CLARA CHAN 



FASH ION'S SPRI NC SONG 



In the Spring, a young woman's fancy 
turns to gay clothes that disperse Win- 
ter's gloom; to new modes that delight 
the feminine individualism; and to new 
fabrics that make one season distinct 
from the other. Thus, with the begin- 
ning of this new year, we are not sur- 
prised to find ourselves again confronted 
with the problem of being chic and 
smart in the styles to be. 

SUITS MORE IMPORTANT 
THAN EVER— 

The greatest item of interest this year, 
and especially for Spring, is the suit. 
You recall how for the past few years, 
we have been followers of men's style, 
both in suits and overcoats. This year, 
we seem to like so much what our big 
brothers and husbands are wearing, that 
we have taken over the very materials 
that they use. Classic stripes or pin 
stripes, gray Herringbone tweed, and 
men's wear flannels will be used almost 
exclusively in sport and very tailored 
suits. Gray, of the lighter shade, seems 
to be the predominating color, although 
navy blue, and brown are still of 
interest. 

Suit ensembles of the dressier type 
consist of short three-quarter coats with 
free folds, which are very full from 
shoulder to hip. Bolero jacket ensembles 
are worn with full short skirt, and will 
just be the thing for tall slim girls who 
can wear them with a youthful air. 
AND WITH YOUR NEW SUIT— 

It is well to remember that with these 
new tailored suits, new blouses and 
sweaters accompany them. With smooth 
woolens — such as men's flannels, a nubby 
sweater or crinkle crepe blouse; but with 
rough tweeds — a plain knitted sweater 
or a classic silk blouse. In short, con- 
trast in the texture of materials is de- 
sirable. 

GOING SCOTCH— 

Not forgetting that checks and plaids 
have been widely used, let us remind you 
that this year, the wave for Scotch 
things will be greater than ever. To avoid 
being confused with last season's usage 
of plaids, wear your jacket of a new 
plaid with new combination of colors, 
with a plain solid colored skirt, rather 
than the plaid skirt with plain top jacket. 
A TUX FOR YOU— 

Having adopted first the sport back 
model of men's suits, and now the fitted 



line and material, we must go even 
further and put one over on the boy 
friend by copying his tuxedo. One of 
the leading Parisian designers introduced 
a cocktail suit tailored in all appear- 
ances as the tuxedo. Midnight blue, with 
trim satin lapels and fitted lines, they 
will be good for cocktail bars and cab- 
aret affairs. 

FANCIFUL PRINTS— 

Delightful and almost daring combi- 
nation of colors will again be seen. But 
aside from that, the newest prints will 
be animated in motif. 

In the collection of conventional 
flower prints, we find field flowers and 
garden flowers grouped in a variation of 
new ways. The incorporation of new 
shades of color is also used. Some of the 
flower designs are drawn with great real- 
ism and precision. The popular daisy 
pattern seen last Spring will continue 
to be in favor, and tulips, marguerites, 
and nasturtiums will leap in style. 

A profusion of prints with animal 
motifs are already on display in some 
of our local shops. They make up nicely 
for spectator silk dresses. Elephants, 
lions, dogs, and others will literally live 
among us. Wear one at the next occa- 
sion at El Cerrito or Bay Meadows. 

Another new motif is taken from the 
sports field and from vegetable gardens. 
Tennis figures, golf clubs, and leaping 
figures all are suggestive of active play. 
These appear more in cottons and linens. 
Cherries, tomatoes, and mushrooms are 
found in the vegetable prints. 

If you are not print conscious, you 
will be ere long, for with the incoming 
of these delightfully new motifs and 
clever designs, your day dresses, as well 
as evening dresses, will not miss includ- 



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Two Piece Evening Ensemble 
Favored By Oakland Girls 

At the annual dinner dance of the 
Oakland Chi-U Club held at See Hoy 
Low on January 2, a new note in fashion 
was gleaned from the gowns worn fey the 
young ladies who attended this social 
affair. 

Formal gowns were worn, but dinner 
dresses of the two-piece type proved 
most popular. A blouse of silver and 
white lace was worn by Miss Lucille Chu. 
A stiffly pleated "standup" collar framed 
her face, and the pleatings were repeated 
at the armhole. The skirt was of black 
crepe with a red velvet belt. 

Miss Lilac Quan was attired in a gown 
with unusual color combination. The 
printed blouse was of tan color with 
shirrings around the neckline. A rhine- 
stone clip was placed at the center. She 
completed this evening ensemble with a 
black velvet skirt. 

Miss Winona Young's two piece outfit 
was of white and vermillion. Equally 
fashionable were the dinner dresses of 
white, gold, red, and blue. 



ing in the collection, one or more of 

these prints. 

SIMPLICITY FOR EVENING 

MODE— 

As a reaction against the sumptuous- 
ness of fabrics, styles, and accessories of 
the Renaissance influence of the past 
season, the coming mode will be definite- 
ly towards simplicity and informality in 
style. 

In the evening mode, we see tight, se- 
verely plain skirts, as against the many 
draperies and complicated cuts. How- 
ever, there still remains a vestige of 
Grecian influence in a few draped eve- 
ning gowns, but the material used will 
be less elaborate. Decolletes tend to be 
higher in front, and less formal. As in 
sportswear, suits also invade the eve- 
ning mode. Some of the smartest models 
seen will be evening suits of the jacket 
type, and two-piece models designed 
after the jumper frocks. 

SHORTER SKIRT— 

Skirt hems are steadily climbing. For 
daytime wear, the shorter skirt will be 
rather full; while for the evening, frocks 
of ankle length replace the trains and 
floor length hems. 



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Page 14 



CHINESE DICEST 



January 17, 1936 



MEI LUN YUEN 
(Continued from Page 12) 
which had been occupied for three years. 
After considerable difficulty, the workers 
managed to place all the children, some 
back with their relatives and friends, and 
others temporarily in institutions. The 
Infant Shelter was at that time the only 
institution in San Francisco for children 
under five years of age, but it was not 
their policy to admit Oriental children. 
Even when they finally consented to do 
so, the problem was not solved, since 
the Infant Shelter provides for transient 
cases only. 

After some time, the crying need for 
a shelter for these homeless babies was 
again felt. Finally, in answer to many 
requests, Miss Cameron again took 9 or 
10 children into the Mission Home, con- 
trary to the wishes of the Presbyterian 
Board. Again, this action incited the 
protests of the San Francisco Board of 
Health and the California Child Wel- 
fare Association. 

Organized Efforts 

As a last resort, Miss Cameron called 
together, in May, 1931, a group of Chi- 
nese Christian men and women, laid the 
problem before them, and requested their 
help and suggestions. This earnest 
group readily realized the urgency of 
the situation and heartily approved of 
organizing a board to wrestle with the 
problem. 

In the meantime, in May, 1932, a 
small house in Menlo Park was rented, 
and the 12 children then at the Mission 
Home were installed there in the care 
of a trained nurse. The arrangement 
proved satisfactory and within a short 
time, the house became overcrowded. A 
more commodious house in Atherton was 
rented in October of the same year, 
and eighteen children were provided for. 

The Board of Trustees of Mei Lun 
Yuen was organized and formally in- 
corporated in March, 1933. The group 
is interdenominational, consisting of 25 
members, both Chinese and American, 
and drawing 15 of its members from the 
original group which was convened in 
May, 1931. 

Gifts and Contributions 

At this time, many gifts came in from 
interested friends. Notable among them 
were generous contributions from Mrs. 
Marshall Lloyd of Berkeley, Miss Eliza- 
beth Gamble of Palo Alto, and Mr. Joe 
Shoone of Oakland. A two-fold cam- 
pa' en was conducted, the first part car- 
ried on in and about San Francisco; the 
second part extended into Chinese com- 
munities throughout the United States. 



Annual subscriptions for maintainence 
were solicited. After the necessary funds 
for construction had been assembled, 
great difficulty was encountered in Ideat- 
ing a suitable piece of land upon which 
to build. Finally, Mrs. Morrison Haw- 
kins, for many years president of the 
Babies' Aid Association of San Franci- 
sco, and who was deeply interested in 
the problem, suggested that the home be 
built on a large lot on 37th Avenue, a 
tract of land owned by the city of San 
Francisco, and held on a 3 5 -year lease 
for the work of the Babies' Aid. When 
she brought the matter before the Asso- 
ciation, it was unanimously passed to give 
privilege to the Mei Lun Yuen Board 
to build on the land without any cost. 
The Mei Lun Yuen building was com- 
pleted in April, 1935. 

From the time the first cottage was 
rented in Menlo Park to the present, 
over 60 babies have been provided for. 
The average stay of these children is 
two years. Several of them were given 
out for adoption. Within the last few 
months, 4 children were adopted, 3 girls 
were transferred to Ming Quong Home 
in Oakland, 2 boys to Chung Mei Home 
in El Cerrito, and one child placed in 
Berkeley, with her family. Because the 
home is a Christian non-sectarian pro- 
ject, with practically all its funds derived 
from Christian sources, it is desired that 
the children be adopted into Christian 
homes. 

Financial Problems 
The financial maintainence of the 
home today depends upon annual mem- 
bership subscriptions, state and county 
aid received for certain children, and 
part or full monthly payments from 
parents or relatives. Through the great- 
est economy, and with the voluntary 
services of many Chinese girls and wo- 
men, the home has managed up to the 
present time. Because the Chinese com- 
munity has been so sorely taxed through 
numerous solicitations, and because it 
"as nor fully awakened to the need of 
such a home to give it primary consider- 
ation, the advisability or possibility of 
annual maintainence campaigns is doubt- 
ed. The future existence of the home 
is. therefore, at stake. Recently, an ap- 
peal was made to the Community Chest 
^r>r financial support. A survey is now 
under wav to investigate the application 
for participation in the Chest budget. 
Bv means of W. P. A. funds, an annex 
to the existine home to be built on an 
pAiorent lot- will make possible the ex- 
f<*n<!.V.n of care to infant's under 12 
months of as^e. 

Thp M»i Lun Yuen is th» onlv Chi- 
nese home for Chinese babies in the 



CHINESE INVENTIONS AND 
DISCOVERIES 

(Continued from Page 8) 
still producing new types of paper, for 
example, papier mache and "India" pa- 
per, a very thin, but tough and opaque, 
fine textured paper for making books. 

The art of paper making was taught 
to the Arabs in Samarkand by Chinese 
prisoners in 650 A. D. It reached Mec- 
ca in 707 A. D. and Egypt 800 A. D. 
It was carried to Spain in 950 A. D. and 
paper mills were set up there by the 
Moors in 1150 A. D. From Spain, 
paper-making spread to France in 1180 
A. D., Italy in 1275 A. D., Germany in 
1391 A. D., and England in 1494 A. D. 

The earliest extant paper was found by 
Dr. Sir M. Aural Stein in a spur of the 
Great Wall, dating back to 150 A. D. 
It was of rag content. The earliest clear- 
ly dated paper was found by Dr. Sven 
Hdein, dating back to 264 A. D. The 
earliest extant wall paper in Europe is 
to be found in London. Is is in the 
Directors' Room of the Coults' Bank, 
situated on the Strand across from Char- 
ring Cross Station. The bank was 
founded in 1754, and the wall paper is 
over 200 years old. A charming lady 
who has just returned from London 
makes this statement: 

The wall paper depicts many scenes 
of Chinese life — tilling the field, plant- 
ing rice, gathering fruit from trees. The 
trees I thought especially beautiful. 
There are court ladies walking in dream. 
gardens or looking through lattices. One 
scene represented an outdoor theater 
with a royal audience in attendance. An- 
other, a mandarin followed by his re- 
tinue, stopped on the highway by a kneel- 
ing petitioner who presented a scroll. 

Many days would be required to study 
the paper carefully. It is not pink, but 
in the soft tones of ivory, amber, and 
green. It is so beautiful that I know no 
words to express the pleasure I had in 
seeing it". 

(Next Week: The Chinese Invented 
Printing, Block Printing, and Movable 
Type Printing.) 

• • 



United States. Its existence is necessary 
not only for the care of the less fortun- 
ate, but it serves also as an experimental 
laboratory in which child hygiene may 
be demonstrated. As Dr. Jeung is wont 
to say, "We are anxious to show to Chi- 
nese mothers what wonders may be ac- 
complished through scientific study and 
proper care of children." 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 15 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo- 



Final League Standing 

With the last games of the schedule 
played last Sunday, the final league 
standing gives the Scout Varsity the 
championship. As a result, the title win- 
ners will receive as awards: a large silver 
three-year perpetual trophy, a perman- 
ent trophy and gold medals. Shangtai 
receives silver medals for the runner-up 
position. All presentations will be made 
at a dance which will be given by the 
Wah Ying Club on Saturday, Feb. 29, 
at the N. S. G. S. Hall. 

Final League Standing: 

Scout Varsity, P. 4, W. 4, L. 0, P. 173, 
P.A. 95. 

Shangtai, P. 4, W. 3, L. 1, P. 189, 
P. A. 118. 

Nulite A. C, P. 4, W. 1, L. 2, P. 72, 
P. A. 111. 

Scou: Juniors, P 4, W. 1, L. 3, P. 107, 
P. A. 162. 

Chi-Fornians, P. 4, W. 0, L. 3, P. 86, 
P. A. 141. 

Points of the Nulite-Chi-Fornian con- 
test were not tabulated as it was declared 
a "no contest." A final decision is pend- 



San Jose Beats Watsonville 

Smarting under two previous defeats, 
the San Jose Chinese cage five travelled 
to Watsonville to hand a 54-33 drubbing 
to the Chinese team last Saturday night 
at the Watsonville Y. M. C. A. gym. 

Jimmy Lee, former San Jose Hi star, 
was high-scorer of the contest, hitting 
the hoop for 18 points, followed by his 
brother, Harry, with 17 digits. Half- 
time tally favored San Jose, 29-10. For 
the Watsonville squad, Earl Goon chalk- 
ed up 12 points, while Walt Lee played 
a nice floor game. 

ing, although league officials pointed out, 
whichever way the outcome is decided, 
it will have no important effect on the 
final league standing. 

Shangtai led in team scoring, making 
189 points in four games, although it 
was sadly in need of points last Sunday. 
The Scout Varsity displayed the strong- 
est defense, holding the opposition to 
an average of less than 24 points per 
game, while the Chi-Fornians had the 
weakest defense, yielding an average of 
47 points per contest. 




W H j P W ■ 




THE TROOP THREE VARSITY 



Left to Right: Henry Kan, Coach Don 
Lee Yuen, Stephen Leong, Silas Chinn, 
Frank Lee, Hin Chin, Captain Earl 
Wong, and Manager Frank D. Wong. 
Players absent: Herbert Tom, Eddie 



Leong and B ; ng Chin. 
1933-34: Y. M. C A. League Champs 
1934-35: Southern California Champs 
1935-36: Wah Ying Bay Region 
Tournament Champs. 



TROOP 3 VARSITY 
WINS CHAMPIONSHIP 

Before a large crowd, the Troop Three 
Scout Varsity copped the Wah Ying 
Basketball Tournament title, by nosing 
out the Shangtai five, 38-31, last Sun- 
day afternoon at French Court. Playing 
one of the best games of the season, the 
Varsity put on an exhibition of classy 
caging, plus a fast offensive and an air- 
tight defense to defeat a heavier and 
more experienced team. 

The Scouts held an early lead, on 
points by Henry Kan, Earl Wong and 
Steve Leong. Shangtai broke into the 
scoring column, after having been re- 
peatedly frustrated in their attempts to 
crack the Scout's defense, wih a long 
shot by Ted Chin that cleared the hoop. 
Charles Hing and Fred Wong followed 
that with baskets, and as the half ended, 
Shangtai held a lead of two points, 14-12. 

Shangtai opened the second half with 
a rush, field goals by Wong increasing 
its lead, which was short-lived, however, 
as the Varsity slowly crept up to over- 
take their rivals, and gradually forged 
ahead. In the closing .minutes of play 
the Shangtai players put on a strong 
rally, only to have the Scouts sink sev- 
eral buckets just before the game ended. 

For the Varsity, Henry Kan and Earl 
Wong were the offensive stars, while 
Steve Leong and Hin Chin were out- 
standing floormen. Fred Wong, with 
thirteen digits, was Shangtai's main 
hope. Charles Hing scored five points 
in the initial half, but was disqualified 
early in the second on four fouls. His 
loss was keenly felt by his team. 

In the first contest of the afternoon, 
the spectators saw another "champion- 
ship" game. The Scout Juniors defeated 
the Chi-Fornians, 38-36, to give the lat- 
ter team the cellar position in league 
standing. It was a close game all the 
way through. The winners got off to 
a strong start, and led 22-14 at half. 
The Chi-Fornians threatened to over- 
come the lead during the entire second 
half. A belated rally in the last minutes 
of play fell short by two points of tying 
the score. Charles Low and Ted Moy, 
both with 14 points, led the Juniors' 
scoring, while Al P. Lee caged 15 points 
to be high-scorer of the contest. Look 
with ten points was another consolation 
for the losers. Captain Ted Lee played 
a good defensive game. 



Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17, 1936 



Championship Team to 
Play League 

The Champions of the First Annual 
Wah Ying Bay Region Basketball Tour- 
nament, Troop Three Varsity, will make 
another "big game" appearance at the 
French Court, on Jan. 26, against a team 
picked from the rest of the league teams. 

A packed house is anticipated to see 
this game. A very close tussle is expec- 
ted, although the pick-up squad may 
lack team-work. However, practically all 
of the players are individual stars and 
an aggregation of this sort is hard to 
beat. 

As a preliminary contest, the married 
men and the single men of the Wah 
Ying Club will clash. At the time the 
game was proposed, it was thought that 
the singles would be overwhelmingly fa- 
vored to win. During the past three 
weeks, the Married Men five has been 
showing the Single Men up in practice 
and scrimmage. At present, the former 
team may enter the tilt a slight favorite 
to win. Starting line-ups for the two 
games will be announced later. 

• • 

SHANGTAI WINS 

Arthur Hee's Shangtai hoop team 
established itself as a definite threat to 
the Unlimited C Division title of the 
City Recreation League by easily defeat- 
ing the National Assurance five, 38-13, 
in its first contest last week at the Fran- 
cisco Court. 

Coach Joe Chew's boys, overcoming 
their rivals' 4-2 lead in the first two 
minutes of play, flashed a fast and pow- 
erful passing and shooting attack fea- 
turing Captain Hing, Fred Wong, Fred 
Gok, Ted Chin and Gerald Leong, to 
pile up a 21-4 tally at the first half ended. 
Shangtai's reserves played all but four 
minutes of the last half. 

Shangtai meets the strong Sunset Ma- 
jors on Monday, Jan. 20, at 8:00 p. m. 
at Francisco. The public is invited. 

• • 

Odd Basketball Game 

In one of the most unusual basketball 
games ever played, the Protestant Or- 
phanage 70-pound basketball team de- 
feated the Chinese Y. M. C A. seventy 
pounders at Kezar Pavilion last week 
by a score of 3-0 This tally beats what 
we think is some sort of a record for low 
score, 3-2 being established in a college 
game some time ago. 



Coaches for St. Mary's A. C. Official All-Stars Named 



The services of six boxing and basket- 
ball coaches have been secured by the 
St. Mary's Athletic Club, its member- 
ship now numbering ninety. Four other 
experts in athletics were also obtained 
as advisors for the club. 

At the regular monthly meeting of 
the club, held last Sunday, all these 
coaches were introduced to the members 
and plans were made to start regular 
boxing and basketball activities. Besides 
Leo Carr.the athletic director, the 
coaches were Jack and Barney Carr, 
amateur boxers and members of the 
Olympic boxing team; George McSween- 
ey, Joe O'Malley, and Mike Frigict. The 
advisors consisted of Mr. Kirsch and Mr. 
Nugent, Brother Raymond and Brother 
Augustine, the last two being members 
of the athletic department of Sacred 
Heart College of this city. 

The members have the use of the audi- 
torium and an outside basketball court. 
The club is open to every young boy in 
the community. 

• • 

ALL-AROUND STAR 

Ray Chun, mentioned in this column 
as a football star at the Carson City High 
School, was also All-State basketball star 
at the school, playing forward. He is 
a track man as well, specializing in 
high and broad jump. Ray also plays 
basketball with the Nulite A. C, although 
he has not appeared on local courts due 
to conflict with working hours. 

• • 

Reports are having it that some of the 
players of the Lowa Club of Los Angeles 
think that they were given a raw deal 
a few weeks ago when they played a 
local basketball team. Many fans 
thought they received several "bad 
breaks". It might help future visiting 
teams a lot if, prior to any game, the 
referee call together the two teams and 
explain his interpretation of the vari- 
ous rules, especially in regard to the 
narrow confines of the French Court. 

• • 

The handsome fellow who works at 
the Shang Tai Cafe was one of the best 
basketball players while at high school 
in Clifton, Arizona, playing on the 
school team. His name is Othel "Oats" 
Mammon. He also played for the Y. 
M. C. A. team at El Paso, Texas. 



Two Shangtai, two Scout Varsity and 
one Nulite player were placed on the 
first-string \Vah Ying League All-Stars 
team, 'ihey are Charles Hing, Shangtai 
and Henry Kan, Varsity, forwards; barl 
Wong, Varsity, center; and Fred Gok, 
Shangtai, and Daniel Leong, Nulite, 
guards. Earl Wong and Charles Hing 
were unanimous choices. 

Lierald Leong was selected as second- 
string center without a dissenting vote, 
as were Fred Wong, Shangtai forward, 
and Don Lee Yuen, Varsity guard. Hin 
Chin, Varsity forward and Ted Chin, 
Shanghai guard, comprised the remain- 
der of the second team. Ribbons will be 
awarded to these ten players. 

"There are so many good players we 
are sorry that only ten could be placed 
on the All-Stars," stated James Jung, 
chairman of the Board of Selections, 
when the two teams were announced two 
days ago, after many hours of delibera- 
tion and pro and con discussion. 

In fact, there are many classy hoop- 
sters, such as Captain Al Young, Peter 
Chong and Charles Low of the Scout 
Juniors, Steve Leong and Silas Chinn 
of the Varsity, George Lee of Shangtai, 
Captain Ted Lee, Jack Look and Frank 
Choy of Chi-Fornians, and Captain Al- 
fred Gee, Howard Ho and Wilfred JJue 
of Nulite. Placing of these players 
would not in any way weaken the 
strength of the two squads. 

Twelve players have been named and 
will be invited to comprise the league 
team which plays the championship 
Scout Varsity five on Jan. 26. They are: 
Wilfred Jue, Alfred Gee and Daniel 
Leong of Nulite, Ted Lee and Al Park 
Lee of Chi-Fornians, and the following 
Shangtai men, George Lee, Lee Po, Fred 
Gok, Ted Chin, Gerald Leong, Charles 
Hing and Fred Wong. 

JIU-JITSU— CUTE SPORT 

Some time ago a certain Mr. McGrath, 
a 240-pounder and an expert in jiu-jitsu, 
invaded a Chinese laundry in Chicago, 
to apply a new trick on Harry Chan, 
height-five feet two, weight, 120. The 
thud when the body smacked the floor 
was terrific. But the body belonged to 
Mr. McGrath, who learned a new lesson 
as well as earned a jail sentence. 

Great sport — jiu-jitsu, especially for 
the peewees whom the big husky brutes 
think they can bulldoze. 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 17 



CHINESE LORE— CONFUCIUS 

(Continued from Page 9) 

heritance. Though taught at different 
times and to different people far removed 
from each other, the lessons were the 
same — loftiness of purpose, purity of 
life and uprightness in conduct in all 
relations with ones fellow man. 

THE "FOUR BOOKS" 

Confucius died leaving but a few books 
of his own composition, and these rather 
mediocre compilations of history and 
poetry as illustrating ethics, and what 
happens, or should happen, to the good 
and to the evil man. After his death his 
disciples gathered and reverently wrote 
down what they could remember of his 
doctrines and conversations. They made 
three books of them — "The Analects", 
or "Conversations", the "Great Learn- 
ing", and "The Doctrine of the Mean". 
To these was later added a fourth, a re- 
statement of the Confucian doctrines by 



Mencius, who lived about a hundred 
years later than Confucius. The four 
thin pamphlets make up the famous 
"Four Books", the guide of Chinese con- 
duct through the centuries. In like man- 
ner Plato and Xenophon wrote down the 
words of their master Socrates, and the 
authors of the Gospels the story and the 
teachings of Jesus. 
HUMAN CONDUCT ALL- 
IMPORTANT 

Confucius never professed to be a 
great philosopher, nor one who sought 
to discover the secrets of the universe 
or of existence. He was a practical man, 
not a theorist. He was primarily inter- 
ested in man as a social creature. He 
indicated simply what a good man should 
be and do. He was interested in politics 
and in good government. He was not 
concerned in any way with explanations 
of the outer universe, but with the duties 
of human beings toward each other in 
their everyday life. In a word human 
conduct was for him the all-important 



thing, and to that he devoted his life. 

He founded no religion, nor did he 
claim to be divine, or have a divine mes- 
sage. But his teachings have so pro- 
foundly influenced the world's most num- 
erous race that from them have sprung 
a religion and a philosophy in addition 
to the simple ethical system taught by 
him. 

There is no time to discuss the growth 
and development of these later phases 
of Confucianism, or how it became and 
remained the State religion of the Chi- 
nese for about 2000 years. My object to- 
day has been to acquaint you with one 
of the world's greatest teachers, one who 
laid the solid moral foundation of a 
whole civilization. To Confucius more 
than to any other one man the Chinese 
people owe that stability of character, 
and that obedience of the moral law which 
have enabled them to weather and to sur- 
vive the storms and strains of over 2000 
years of their national history. 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 

(Continued from Page 11) 
lodge half a dozen warlords from their 
strongholds. These included Sun Chuan- 
fang, Chang Tsung-chang, Wu Pei-fu, 
Chang Tso-lin, and lesser members of 
their ilk. 

At an opportune time, when all it 
needed was his aid to bring ignominous 
defeat to the northern militarists, Feng, 
knowing perfectly well which way the 
wind was blowing, deserted his old ally, 
Wu Pei-fu, and joined the Nationalists. 
Naming his army the Kuominchun 
(People's Army) he marched against 
Wu and was a decisive factor in causing 
the latter's defeat. 

For his part in helping the Nation- 
alist cause Feng was rewarded with 
a high position in the council of the 
Kuomintang. Before long, however, he 
turned against Chiang Kai-shek, say- 
ing that he took the step because 
he believed the latter was pro- Jap- 
anese, was insincere in his political 
policies, and harbored delusions of be- 
coming dictator of China. His revolu- 
tionary temperament had got the best of 
him. Taking his personal army with him, 
he retired into the north, near Russian 
territory, and periodically issued defi- 
ances at the Kuomintang. 

From then on Feng was a militarist 
not to be trusted by his fellow warlords. 
He could gain no more support from 
o:her semi-warlords who give their lip- 
service to Nanking. But Feng bided his 
time. 



Feng Against Chiang 

The inexplicable non-resistance of the 
Chinese army at the time of the Man- 
churian invasion, in 1931, the Shanghai 
"incident" in 1932, the occupation 
of Jehol in 1933, and the signing of 
the Tangku treaty a little later, which 
called for a cessation of armed Sino- 
Japanese conflicts in the north and the 
creation of a demilitarized zone in that 
territory, gave Feng his long awaited 
chance. He came out of obscurity and 
bellowed for the people's support to re- 
sist the Japanese and to depose Chiang. 
It was the opportunity of a lifetime and 
he took full advanage of it. He furious- 
ly denounced Chiang as a traitor, snorted 
his undying opposition to Japan, and 
dispatched telegrams to every warlord he 
knew calling for assistance to his cause. 

But Feng's military star had waxed 
and waned. Although a few nondescript 
warlords heeded his call, those whose 
money and troops mattered discreetly 



kept silent. More in disappointment 
than in dispair, Feng once more retired, 
this time into Chahar Province. 
Chiang and Feng 
But Chiang Kai-shek, once more prov- 
ing his astuteness as a politician as well 
as a military strategist, made overtures 
last year to Feng to compose their differ- 
ences. Perhaps Chiang reasoned after 
all that a friendly Feng is several times 
better than a Feng who continually 
makes embarrassing insinuations against 
the central government. Feng was invited 
to the recent Kuomintang caucus, and, 
shortly after, was appointed vice-minis- 
ter of military affairs. Chiang has many 
ways of dealing with recalcitrant war- 
lords, and in making him a vice-minister 
of military affairs he may be able to curb 
Feng's fur:her anti-Nanking and anti- 
Chiang activities, and in the end bring 
Feng entirely under his control. Feng 
is a genial rascal and Chiang rather likes 
him. 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Sir: Enclosed find $ for ___ 

period of The Chinese Digest. 

Name. 

Address 

City State 

Six Months $1.25; 1 Year #2.00;Foreign $2.75 Year. 



Page 18 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 17, 1936 




STILL WISHING 



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less modern, less satisfying instrument. 




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NEW LIFE FOR ANY RADIO IN RCA TUBES 

THE GOLDEN STAR RADIO CO. 

846 Clay Street Telephone CHina 2322 

San Francisco, California 



January 17, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 19 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



PUBLISHER'S DAUGHTER SAILS 

Miss Emma Lum, daughter of a well- 
known publisher, Walter U. Lum, and. 
a social worker with the S. E. R. A. for 
the past year, sailed for China for a va- 
cation last Friday on board the S. S. Taft. 

Just prior to her sailing, she was guest 
of honor at a bon voyage party at Top- 
sy's Roost at the Beach. Among those 
present were: Mrs Pearl Cheung, Mrs. 
Wye Wing, Mrs. Yep Lock, Mrs. K. T. 
Eng, Mrs- Anna Lee, Misses Alice Eng, 
Miriam Lum, Anna Lee, Elaine Lee, and 
Messrs. Walter U. Lum, Wallace Tong, 
Arthur Eng and William Tong. 

• 
GENERAL TU IN SAN FRANCISCO 

General T. H. Tu is now in San 
Francisco to join his wife and three boys 
who arrived from China on the S.S. 
Hoover on Wednesday. The first thing 
that the boys did was co take a swim in 
the "Y" pool, to see if the water is as 
wet as the rain. 

There are at present about 84,800 kilo- 
meters of highways in China, over which- 
a total of about 50,000 motor vehicles 
are travelling, according to figures re- 
leased by the Bureau of Public Roads of 
the National Economic Council. 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Feb. 4; President Taft (San 
Francisco) Feb. 12; President Cleve- 
land (San Francisco) Mar. 3; Presi- 
dent Hoover (San Francisco) Mar. 11; 
President Taft (San Francisco) Mar. 31; 
President Coolidge (San Francisco) 
Apr. 8. 

SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Garfield (San Fran- 
cisco) Jan. 17; President Hoover (San 
Francisco) Jan. 24; President Polk 
(San Francisco) Jan. 31; President 
Taft (San Francisco) Feb. 7; President 
Adams (San Francisco) Feb. 14; Presi- 
dent Coolidge (San Francisco) Feb. 21; 
President Harrison (San Francisco) 
Feb. 28. 



C. S. C. A. Bulletin 

Two special articles, a page of reviews 
of books about China and things Chinese, 
a page of photographs, and more than 
twenty news items, mostly of Chinese 
student activities in America, feature the 
contents of the current (December) num- 
ber of the Chinese Students' Christian 
Association Bulletin. 

One lengthy article is written by Y. , 
T. Wu, an executive of the National 
Council of the Y. M. C. A. in China, 
entitled "The Chinese Mind". This 
article was concurrently published in the 
Christian Century magazine, and discus- 
ses the tense Sino-Japanese political sit- 
uation and its present effects on the ( 
Chinese people as a whole. 

Mr. Wu said that he was "writing as 
a pacificist. The purpose of the present 
analysis is not to engender more animo- 
sity or to stir up more hatred when the 
situation by itself is bad enough." 

The second article written by a former 
member of the American Consular staff 
at Hong Kong is entitled "Chinese Stu- 
dents as Mining Engineers." It deals 
with the various branches of mining in- 
dustry in South China today and the part 
which returned students from America 
are playing in it. Graduates of the Uni- 
versity of California are predominant in 
this industry, with several from Colum- 
bia, Lehigh, and the Colorado School of 
Mines. The output of tungsten, anti- 
mony, tin, gold, lead, coal, and iron in 
the southern provinces are given in de 
tail. 

The Bulletin also cited the fact that 
Michigan University has the largest con- 
tingent of Chinese students in America 
this academic term, the number being 
154, 19 of them girls. These students 
are registered for 29 different courses, 
with engineering taking the lead. 



FEAR PEST PERIL 

According to a report of the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Federal ex- 
perts view with alarm the danger of new 
insect pests being brought from the Far 
East on the Clipper airships. Quaran- 
t'ne inspectors' main problem is passen- 
gers who carry with them small packages 
of plants or fruit and are unaware that 
a few inconspicuous insects or leaf spots 
might start an infestation of the pests. 

• 
A daughter was born on Jan. 2 to the 
wife of Ong Sai Ling, 642 Jackson St., 
San Francisco. 



MOORE'S 
SEMI-ANNUAL 

SALE 




Hart 
SchafFner 
& Marx 8C 
Mansfield 
SUITS 

$01.50 



21 



#24.50 



#27.50 



— exactly what you'll need for 

the New Year festivities. 
— you save doubly! On the 

sale markdown and 1936 

advances. 
— sports - back also business 

suits. Rare wool topcoats. 

MOORE'S 

840 Market, 141 Kearny 

San Francico 

1450 Broadway, Oakland 



Page 20 



CHINESE DIGEST 



lanuary 17, 1936 



TH€ 



—ROOS 

LONG anoSHORT 

OF IT! 




A 3^ SHORT IS A C-HAP AROUND FIVE 
FEET TALL. .-A 52 LONG STOUT IS A FELL- 
OW SIX FEET THREE OR FOUPL. TIPP- 
ING TMF SCALES AT ABOUT 275 POUNDS 
BOTH CAN BE FITTED IN ROOS BUSIN- 
ESS SUITS AT $15 *32 AND*39 AND 
THAT'S THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT..- 1 



OLD OR YOUNG \ 
SMOPT OR TALL I 
THINOR FAT 
ROOS FITS 'EM ALl! / 



THE ROOS-TCR 





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SAN FRANCISCO • OAKLAND • HOLLYWOOD • BERKELEY 
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a weekly rueucfvnow 






COMM£«T - - SOCIAL - ► SPOaTS 
tt€ WS — CULTUft€ • * l,IT£££7U££ 




SAM SftftNClSCO.CMAfOilWiSV 



H 



Vol. 2, No. 4 



January 24, 1936 



Five Cents 



CURRENT NEWS ABOUT CHINA 



By Tsu Pan 



• CHIANG TALKS TO STUDENTS 

• YEN AND FENG 

• DOIHARA AGAIN 

• HIROTA'S NEW PRINCIPLES 

Hundreds of college professors, school principals 
and student delegates from various provinces in China 
gathered at Nanking one day last week to listen to 
General Chiang Kai-shek expound his theory on China's 
foreign relations. Chiang declared to the anxious 
crowd that the Nanking Government will not, under 
any circumstances, sign agreements with foreign na- 
tions detrimental to the administrative and terri- 
torial integrity of China. 

Although the Government is laboring under stressed 
conditions, he pledged himself to cope with adversities 
to his best efforts. China's military preparedness at 
present, is far from being able to declare war against 
any nation, he said, but if China should be compelled 
to seek the last resort, she is willing to take the sacrifice. 

General Chiang's motive for the conference with 
the teachers and students was prompted by the recent 
student agitations in various parts of China demanding 
a stronger policy to face the Japanese imperialistic 
inroads. The students were urged by General Chiang 
to refrain from taking part in politics but to devote 
their time and energy to their scholastic pursuits. 



General Yen Hsi-san became one of the highest 
military officers in China on January 16, when he ac- 
cepted the appointment to the vice-chairmanship of 
the Military Affairs Commission. The former gov- 
ernor of Shansi province has retired from military ser- 
vice for some time and was engaged in the agricultural 
rehabilitation work in North China. 

General Yen is one of the New Dealers in China 
and is at present experimenting on his new agricultural 
policy. According to his theory, the farming villages 
issue bonds to buy the tillable land in the village 
vicinities. The land is then distributed to individual 
farmers for cultivation and twenty per cent of the 
yearly yield from each farmer is then collected to 
redeem the bond issues. This scheme is intended to 



bring the ownership of the land to the farmers and 
to secure better economic and social order in the farm- 
ing provinces. 

Holding identical position with General Yen is Gen- 
eral Feng Yu-hsiang, the famous "Christian General" 
of China. General Feng made an appeal to the nation 
last week to shorten the man's long gown by one foot. 
The general figured that if every male Chinese shorten 
their long gowns by that magnitude, China would have 
enough money in one year to buy ammunition sufficient 
to exterminate the largest army in the world. 

The embodiment of General Yen and General Feng 
in the Central Affairs Commission led observers to 
believe that the Nanking Government had succeeded 
in bringing out an alignment among the dominant lead- 
ers in China. As all the army officers in North China 
were subordinates of these two generals, the presence 
of their former chiefs in the Commission will facilitate 
the planning of a consolidated line of national defense. 



In Tientsin, a conference was held last week among 
General Kenji Doihara, chief of intelligence of the 
Japanese army, General Tayao Tada, commander of 
Japanese garrisons in North China, and General Sung 
Cheh-yuan, chairman of Hopei-chahar Political Coun- 
cil, to discuss the outstanding North China issues. 

The Conference failed to bring out any material 
results as the Japanese generals refused to banish the 
autonomous regime in the demilitarized zone established 
by Yin Yu-keng. 

The Japanese militarists also warned General Sung 
to stop all anti-Japanese movements in North China, 
it was reported, or else he would suffer the conse- 
quences. 



New developments in Sino-Japanese diplomatic re- 
lations are generally expected as the newly appointed 
Japanese Ambassador Hachiro Arita makes prepara- 
tion to proceed to China. In an interview with Foreign 
Secretary Hirota last week, Arita was told to deal with 
the Nanking officials on the following principles: 

1. The Japanese Government hopes to 
(Continued on Page 2) 



cooperate 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 24, 1936 



FAR EAST 



TSU PAN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

with Nanking and shall render assistance 
to China whenever necessary. 

2. China should reorganize the cen- 
tral government to oust the anti-Japanese 
element, and the national finance of Chi- 
na should be separated from the Central 
Bank of China. 

3. Sino- Japanese corporations should 
be organized to prevent flood and to do 
conservancy work in China. 

4. China should respect the treaty 
rights of foreign people in China in 
order to avoid international complica- 
tions. 

This is the second set of principles 
formulated by Hirota on Chinese Jap- 
anese relations. Previously Hirota had 
set forth a three-point policy demanding 
China to stop anti-Japanese activities, 
to suppress communists and to recognize 
"Manchukuo". He expressed his willing- 
ness to adjust the difficulties with China 
at a conference in Nanking, but adjust- 
ments must follow in line with his new 
principles, he said. 

• • 

HOTELS FOR CHINA TOURISTS 

The establishment of modern hotels 
and guest houses in fourteen inland cities 
in China have vastly improved traveling 
facilities for foreign tourists to that 
country. This means of attracting more 
tourists to China's interior by providing 
them with clean, up to date hotels was 
brought about by a group of merchants 
interested in stimulating the tourist trade, 
under the direction of the China Travel 
Service. 

In the past, few travelers have ventured 
into China's interior because of the lack 
of proper sleeping quarters on the way. 
This obstacle has now been removed in 
many places, and modern hotels may 
be found as far as Sian, in the in- 
terior of northwest China. 

• • 

In normal years China's production 
of rice is about 250,000,000 quintals. 
Since 1929, China has been exporting 
4,000,000 pounds of rice yearly to for- 
eign countries. 

• • 

It has been estimated that during nor- 
mal years the annual remittance of mo- 
ney to China from Chinese overseas is 
between #150,000,000 and $200,000,000. 



Nanking Celebrates 
Opening of Children's 
Year 

Nanking was bedecked with National 
flags and the whole city was in a gay 
holiday spirit with the youngsters turning 
out en masse to celebrate the inaugura- 
tion of the Children's Year recently. 

The day was started off with respects 
paid to the Mausoleum of Dr. Sun Yat- 
sen, late founder of the Republic, at 
seven in the morning, by more than 100 
juvenile delegates from the local schools. 
Meanwhile, a plane was commissioned 
to drop leaflets from the sky commem- 
orating the occasion. 

After the delegation left the Mauso- 
leum, they broke up into various groups 
to call on government and party organs 
in Nanking. Among the offices visited 
were the Central Party Headquarters, 
the National Government, the Executive 
Yuan, the Ministry of Education, the 
Ministry of Interior, the Ministry of 
Industry, the National Health Admini- 
stration, the Municipal Government, and 
the City Tangpu. 

Responsible heads of the aforesaid or- 
ganizations enthusiastically greeted the 
representatives and after brief exchange 
of messages, the delegates were presented 
with gifts by the government and party 
leaders. 

The main event of the day took place 
at 8 o'clock at the New Capital Theater 
when the inaugural ceremony was held. 
Altogether, more than 1,800 persons par- 
ticipated in the meeting, these including 
youngsters from 150 local schools, facul- 
ty members, government and party offi- 
cials. 

Dr. Wang Shih-chieh, Minister of Ed- 
ucation, made the opening remarks. He 
explained the significance embodied in 
the mandate issued by the National Gov- 
ernment in relation to the inauguration 
of the Children's Year. Dr Wang urged 
the public to co-operate with the gov- 
ernment in promoting the welfare of 
children in China. 



HOWARD MACEE 

COUNSELLORAT-LAW 

• 
EXbrook 0298 San Francisco 

Anglo Bank Bldg. ■ 8)0 Market St. 



Catholic Medical Bureau 
in Peiping 

A new and important addition to the 
Catholic medical mission work in China 
came into being recently with the estab- 
lishment in Peiping of a central medical 
bureau. The official name of this bur- 
eau is "Catholic Medical Service," and 
its function is "to aid and coordinate 
Catholic medical efforts and keep the 
missions in step with the progress in hy- 
giene being made in China." 

This bureau is located in the north- 
ern part of the city. A native and a 
foreign doctor already have taken up 
permanent residence there. 

Specifically the Catholic Medical Ser- 
vice aim at fulfilling the following pro- 
gram: 

Consultation for the missionary per- 
sonnel, directly or by letter; consultations 
for persons sent on recommendations of 
missionaries; a free dispensary for the 
poor, an information bureau concerning 
epidemics and vaccines. 

The bureau will also render coopera- 
tion to government health bodies and 
keep Catholic doctors informed of mea- 
sures designed by government doctors to 
improve the health of the people, and 
new methods of hygiene and sanitation. 

One unique feature of this Medical 
Service is that persons applying for in- 
formation can use any of the following 
languages: Chinese, Latin, English, 
French, Italian, German, or Dutch. 

• • 
SHANGHAIS POPULAR SPORT 

For many years the chief forms of 
sports played in Shanghai were cricket, 
football, and tennis. Horseracing was 
also popular, and many business houses 
would declare a holiday whenever a great 
and exciting race was to be witnessed. 

Right now. however, whippet and grey- 
hound racing are the popular sports of 
the day, and Chinese and foreigners alike 
are eager devotees. Golf, too, is making 
headway among the sportsmen, and 
many Chinese are taking it up. 

• • 

Estimates of the Chinese Cotton Mill 
Owners' Association places China's an- 
nual production of cotton at 4,894,000 
quintals. China ranks third in the 
world's production of cotton. United 
States and India are the principal coun- 
tries producing this commoditv. 



January 24, 1936 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



Oakland Center Activities 

Capacity attendance witnessed the ele- 
ven-reel Chinese drama picture of the 
Oakland Chinese Center at the Lincoln 
Grammar School, Thursday evening, 
Jan. 23. The Center, cooperating with 
Mr. Kretsinger, principal of Lincoln 
School, made the necessary arrangements 
so that every child was extended the 
privilege of seeing the show. 

At the 'November meeting, Dr. Jacob 
J. Yee lectured on the subject of tuber- 
culosis, and illustrated his talk with slides 
and microscopic observations. Dr. Ray- 
mond L. Ng, at the December meeting, 
spoke on the subject of visual correction, 
illustrated with sound pictures. At the 
January meeting, Professor Chih Pei Sha 
of the Oriental Department of the Uni- 
versity of California, gave a highly en- 
lightening talk on "Manchuria, a World 
Problem". 

The Center will have the pleasure of 
hearing Mr. Enrico Del'Osso, Assistant 
Superintendent of Boys' Recreation of 
the Oakland Recreation Department, at 
its coming February meeting. This lec- 
ture will be followed by a caravan to 
the centers of various nationalities. 



CHINESE EDITOR SPEAKS 

At a meeting held last Wednesday at 
the Club of Ming Studio, the Chinese 
Progressive Association discussed means 
and plans for promoting better citizen- 
ship. 

The chief speaker of the evening was 
Mr. Chow Souyu, editor of the Wan Kow 
Canton Daily. He stressed the necessity 
for concerted action to regain our econ- 
omic interests, as well as to find new 
outlets for the younger generation. 

"One of the first essentials is for 
the native born to acquire the voting 
habit: only then will we be able to gain 
political strength", said Dr. Chang W. 
Lee. "Another great need", said Mr. 
Henry Tom, Y. M. C. A. secretary, "is 
to awaken the need for civic pride, es- 
pecially with reference to sanitation and 
cleanliness". 

China's annual consumption of sugar 
totals almost 1,000,000 long tons. As 
she produces less than one-third of what 
she needs, China has to import about 
800,000 long tons of this commodity 
from other countries, chiefly Java. 



FIRECRACKERS FOR NEW YEAR 

Permission has been obtained for the 
Chinese community of San Francisco to 
celebrate its Chinese New Year with fire- 
crackers, it was announced. Members 
of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent 
Association with Attorney John L. Mc- 
Nab called on Mayor Rossi in a body 
and obtained his permission. Fireworks 
will be allowed one hour during the even- 
ing of Jan. 23; and one hour at noon 
and in the evening from Jan. 24 to 
Jan. 30, inclusive. It is urged that every- 
one cooperate and observe the time al- 
lowed for the use of firecrackers. 



LESSONS IN INDUSTRIAL 
CHEMISTRY 

A free course in organic chemistry will 
be given by Dr. F. Y. Chuck in China- 
town. The course will essentially be a 
study of the theory and reactions of or- 
ganic compound, together with a survey 
of chemical compounds which have ap- 
plication to modern industries. 

The class will be limited to ten, and 
preference will be given to those who 
have adequate elementary preparation. 
This course is given free in the hope of 
encouraging young people to create busi- 
nesses of their own. For appointment, 
telephone CHina 0316. 



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Patronize Our Advertiser; — They Help to Ma/(e This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 24, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 




Edward Leong, better known to China- 
town as "Colday Yin", wants us to voice 
his appreciation of the many friends 
who have asked for his services at 
Moore's Store for Men at 141 Kearney 
Street. He has been Chinese represen- 
tative at Moore's for a year and a half, 
and his theory of "drop-in-an4-look- 
around" has proven its value in the in- 
creasing Chinese following who drop in 
and look around without the fear of 
being high-pressured out of their life 
savings. 

"We sell you what you want to buy, 
and outside of friendly suggestions, we 
stick to the policy that the customer 
knows his "clothing onions" enough to 
do his own choosing" is his creed. 

Colday is a Polytechnic High School 
graduate and a member of the Wah 
Ying Club, and although he has hung 
up his cleats for almost two years, China- 
town still remembers him for his stellar 
performance with the Chinese All-Stars 
when they played some years ago. 

• • 

CONFERENCE LEADERS MEET 

The first meeting of the conference 
leaders was held at the Chinese Y. W. 
C. A., Tuesday. All meetings are for the 
purpose of planning program, regis- 
tration, etc. for the coming 1936 con- 
ference. The location will be decided 
upon at the next meeting. 

Those present were: Chairman Alice 
Fong, Misses Nui Bo Tang, Marie Tom, 
Helen Chan, Alyce Lee, Messrs. Edwar 
Lee, Edwin Owyang, and Robert G. Poon. 
This group will meet again Feb. 13, 
Thursday, 8 p. m. at the Chinese Y. W. 
C. A. 

Patronize Our 



Dr. Wing Mah Speaker 

The main Branch of the American 
Association of University Women pre- 
sented Dr. N. Wing Mah last Monday 
evening on the subject "The Outlook in 
the Pacific." 

Formerly a member of the Central Po- 
litical Council, Legislative Yuan (Chi- 
nese Parliament), and in the Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs, Chinese National 
Government, Nanking. He has spent 
many years in China, Japan, and the 
Philippines; has lectured widely on the 
Orient, and, as assistant professor of po- 
litical science at the University of Cali- 
fornia since 1927, has presented courses 
on the domestic and international prob- 
lems of the Far East. 

• • 

Chinese Student Activities 
in New York 

December — 

On the seventh, a discussion on the 
North China Autonomous Movement 
was carried on by the Chinese students in 
Greater New York at International 
House. A cablegram was sent to the 
Nanking government to urge the latter 
to resist Japanese invasion. 

On the twelfth, a round table discus- 
sion was conducted by Wu Buen Nuin, 
a graduate of Tsing Hua University of 
Peiping and a visiting speaker of the 
Institute of Pan-Pacific Relations on 
"North China's Economic Situation." 
Mr. Wu also conducted a panel discus- 
sion on "Anglo-China Alliance", Dec. 17. 

On the eighteenth, a reception was 
given by a group of American friends 
to General Fang Chen-wu. 

"I pledge," said General Fang, "that 
so long as I am breathing, I will struggle 
to drive the Japanese out of my country." 

On January 1, an Annual New Year's 
Banquet was attended by two hundred 
Chinese students at International House. 
The honored speakers were General 
Fang and Consul-General Yee Tuen Get. 



MEN ONLY 
By Golly! 



ALFRED B. CHONC 

INSURANCE 

Kansaj City Life Imurinu Co. 

Office SUtter 2995: Res. PRospect 8135 

111 Sutter St., Sen FrancUco 

Advertisers — They Help to A/aAV This a Bigger 



For those who want to doll up those 
"doggies" at the coming dance, Flor- 
sheim's are offering — "for you, my 
fran' — " regular #10 Florsheims for 
#7.65. Worth walking for. 

And "tuxes"? Why hire one? See 
Harry Mew and he'll do the rest. (Speaks 
well for Harry, eh? or Harry speaks 
well!) 

For that pocketbook still suffering 
from Christmas-itis, we recommend an 
all purpose shoe — street — evening— etc. 
Just look in Sommer and Kaufmann's 
window on Market St. -Shoe enuf! 

And do you know that you can get an 
RCA Magic Brain Radio for only #49.95? 
But not until after February 10 'cause 
that's when they are coming out. All 
metal tubes and console model, too. See 
Tommy Tong of Golden Star Radio Co. 

To comply with that good old Chinese 
custom of a new suit for the New Year, 
remember it's Semi-Annual-Sale-time at 
Moore's. They have some nifties in 
rough and tough stuff that wears and 
wears and wears, and tailored in the 
distinctive Moore-ish manner, too. And 
you sportsmen, tennis hounds, et al, 
thank your lucky "stars" for this! So 
many "hactors" are wearing the new 
Gaucho sportshirts that everybody's do- 
ing it. Of soft flannel — in bro.wn, blue, 
or maroon — with shirred back and collar 
that may be worn open or closed. Velly 
hotcha. Drop in and ask for "Colday" 
at the Kearney Street store. He's hold- 
ing open house and doing everything 
but serving pink tea, and no high pres- | 
sure business, he promises. 

You Don Juans and Romeos, give 
Julie a break. It's an occasion that de- 
mands a decorative tribute for 'de sweet- | 
est gal what is and even friend wife. We 
mean the two dances scheduled for Chi- 
nese New Year, and Sheridan and Bell 
is the place to get 'em. They turn out 
distinctive jobs with that air of savoir 
faire that marks all their work. Reason- 
able, too. Ask for Frank Young. 

Ben Chey got so tired oi repairing | 
cars that he sold his business and is now 
trying to get people to buy new onetj 
that doesn't need any repair work. Iff 
you need one of the spiff y new Ford*, J 
call or look him up at the office of tr 
Charles P. Wait Co. 
and Better Paper 



January 24, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 5 



TEA AN D LANTERNS 



Waku Auxiliary Dance 

Waku Auxiliary flashes the following 
announcement : 

Tomorrow evening, Jan. 25, promises 
to be a memorable event in N. S. G. S. 
Hall on Stockton Street, when the Waku 
Auxiliary of Oakland hold their annual 
Chinese New Year's Dance. Judging 
from the amount of tickets sold, a big 
crowd will be present. The Waku girls 
have engaged the "Rhythm Kings", well 
known orchestra in the bay region, who 
will furnish the music for this occasion. 

"To further the 1936 Leap Year 
theme, ladies' tags will prevail," Emmy 
Lee, club president, declared. "We wish 
everyone to take part in our dance and 
not as disinterested spectators." 
Tickets will be available at the door for 
those who have not purchased same. Cle- 
ver souvenirs will be presented to all the 
young ladies. Come one! Come all! 
Celebrate the old Chinese New Year at 
this delightful gathering. Dancing 
from 8 to 1. 

• • 

CHINATOWN KNIGHTS 
ORCHESTRA BANQUET 

With Mr. Bill Broder of the Union 
Music Company as guest of honor, 
the Chinatown Knights Orchestra will 
hold a banquet at the Far East Restaur- 
ant on Sunday, Jian. 26 at 6 p. m. 

Mrs. Broder will also be present as 
will Mr. George Grace of Sacramento, 
who has been a friend of the members 
of the orchestra ever since the China- 
town Knights were first engaged in one 
of the Capital's leading Chinese cafes. 

• • 

CONGREGATIONAL SOCIETY 
ELECTS NEW OFFICERS 

New officers for 1936 of the Young 
People's Society of the Chinese Congre- 
gational Church of Los Angeles were 
installed on Jan. 5. The new president 
is Bernice Louie, with William Got as 
vice-president; Margaret Leong, secre- 
tary; David Louie, treasurer; John Lamb, 
assistant treasurer; George Wong, ser- 
geant-at-arms; and Roland Got, music 
chairman. 

"Building A More Friendly Church" 
is the goal which the new cabinet with 
the members' cooperation will strive for. 
• • 

A notice of intention to wed was filed 
with the Alameda County clerk last week 
by Harold Hee of San Francisco and 
Stella Wong of Oakland. 

Patronize Our 



L. A. Piano Recital 

Two talented young ladies, May Kane 
Louie and May Yook Louie, and their 
teacher, Miss Myrtle J. Eldred, gave a 
piano recital at the Los Angeles Chinese 
Congregational Church Sunday night, 
Jan. 12, rendering entertaining selections 
of renowned composers, which was 
enjoyed by an attentive and appreciative 
audience. 

Between numbers, Miss Eldred read 
short sketches of the lives of several 
of the famous composers whose compo- 
sitions she and her pupils played. The 
closing number, played by Miss Eldred, 
was "The Hallelujah Chorus," from the 
operetta, "The Messiah," by Handel. 
• • 

"Y" DANCE SUCCESS 

The Chinese Y. M. C. A. Boys' Work 
Committee's dance on Jan. 17 was attend- 
ed by a congenial crowd of 200 persons. 
Music for the affair, which lasted from 
ten to twelve thirty a. m., was furnished 
by the Cathayans Orchestra. 

Among those present were: Consul- 
General and Mrs. Huang, Mr. and Mrs. 
T. Y. Tang, Dr. A. B. Chinn and Patrick 
Sun, deputy consul. Speeches were de- 
livered by Consul Huang, Mr. Tang and 
Mr. Henry Tom. 

Everyone present enjoyed the evening, 
especially the singing of Miss Frances 
Chung, who rendered several popular 
selections. 

• • 
MISSION GRADUATES 

Four Chinese students, two boys and 
two girls, were graduated from the Mis- 
sion High School last week. Graduation 
exercises were held at the school audi- 
torium. The four graduates are Louise 
Lym and Sami Theresa Low; and Edward 
Leong and Paul Wong. 

• • 



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FLORISTS 

• 

Bridal Bouquets, Corsages, 

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Ask For 
FRANK YOUNG 

• 

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san francisco, california 

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Ckitena Dance 

The Chinese Tennis Club of San Fran- 
cisco, which has sponsored a number of 
successful social events, bends all its eff- 
orts to make the coming Chitena Chinese 
New Year's Dance a successful one. 

The president of the club, Dr. Theo- 
dore Lee, with Kern Loo, Fred Mah and 
the dance committee are working fervid- 
ly to make this the 'Hit' dance of the 
year, and the entertainment promises to 
be the best seen or heard at a local dance, 
members declare; . . . Miss Jadin Wong, 
now with the Royal Hawaiian Club, will 
do an exotic solo dance, and Chan Son 
Loy will try to outdo Shirley Temple in 
his singing. David Sum's Cathayans 
has been specially augmented for this 
dance. Many new numbers will be offer- 
ed in novel arrangement. The date is 
Friday 8:30 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. on Jan. 
24, at the N. S. G. S. Hall. 

• • 

Chicago Dance 

Chicago, 111. — For the purpose of 
raising funds to put in improvements 
at their clubrooms, the Chicago Chinese 
Boys' and Girls' Clubs will hold a dance 
soon. 

• • 

KUNG AN SOCIAL 

To start the Chinese New Year with 
a bang, the Kung An Social Club gave 
their first "big eaters" gathering at the 
Far East Cafe Wednesday evening. 
There are more than fifty "happy-go- 
lucky" members in this new organization. 
It consists of a group of "old timers" 
and "good timers". 

This Sunday, members are urged to 
participate in shooting fireworks to com- 
plete their celebration of the New Year. 

• • 
CHINESE PLAY REPEATED 

"Li Chen, the Naughty Chinese Boy," 
was given a repeat performance by the 
Children's Theater Association last Sat- 
urday afternoon at the High School of 
Commerce auditorium. 

The play concerns a little boy whose 
besetting sin is an incline towards too 
much laughter. His grandmother, who 
detests laughter, threatened to exile him 
to the Celestial Ciy as a punishment. It 
was presented in Oriental style, but from 
the American point of view. "Li Chen" 
was enjoyed by the audience. 



Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 24, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



Allee, the Towntrotter, says: 

When the music goes 'round an' round, 
HERBIE LEE (Oakland) is sure burn- 
ing the floor with that certain "Miss 
YEE" (don't blame you!) .... dainty 
FRANCES CHUN is singing with the 
CATHAYANS ORCHESTRA .... in 
tune with the times, FRANCES WONG, 
11 year old daughter of Mrs. MAY- 
BELLE WONG, will render a piano solo 
at the CHITENA dance .... our be- 
loved Consul-General HUANG C CHIN 
is a good dancer, those who attended 
the 'Y' hop last week will agree .... our 
'Bing Crosby' HENRY LUM is a croon- 
er (or a blues' moaner) and also a trav- 
eling 'milk' salesman .... Cupid in 
Chinatown: FRED LIM (Oakland) and 
ALICE NG (Oakland) announce their 
intentions .... petite GRACE YOUNG 
and handsome GEORGE ONG are still 
romancing .... popular among athletic 
circles WONG SHING (Frank to you!) 
and "Miss TOM" are also along the same 
line .... MAE HOO and OW WATT 
filed a marriage license application re- 
cently .... in such a sober mood, WIL- 
LIAM GIN GEE must be 'in love' (we 
know who!) .... My, this is Leap Year, 
too! .... Do you know that: TEDDY 
LEE is conducting a harmonica and tap 
dancing class at the 'Y' .... that he 
can trump the guitar, too .... that 
BAM LEE brought his mustache from 
Stockton and is still wearing it ... . that 
HENRY 'snake' LEONG is working at 
the Nanking Garage .... that ALBERT 
CHOW is part owner of CHI-AM 
'booze' store .... that BENNY LIGH 
is now working with the Forestry Service 
in the 'gold region' of HAYFORK .... 
that EMMA DONG of Watsonville is 
invading our town .... that STEVE 
POND is still recuperating from his 
illness .... that MARGARET QUON 
graduated from Commerce Hi this term 
.... that THOMAS TONG was elected 
athletic manager of the CATHAY CLUB 
.... that JADIN WONG has signed 
a contract to entertain at the ROYAL 
HAWAIIAN NIGHT CLUB .... that 
LUCILLE TANG is cashier at the Jone's 
Cafe .... that EUGENE 'Sinker' 
WONG is representing us in Seattle 
.... that BILL GOT is representing us 
in Los Angeles .... that ERNEST LOO 
is representing us in Oakland .... that 
EVA MOE and Dr. EDGAR LEE are 
representing us in Portland .... that 
IRIS WONG is representing, yes, also 
us, in Watsonville .... that Miss JULI- 
ET CARTER from the footlights of New 



Seattle News 

By Eugene Wong 

Mary Chinn gave a tea and cocktail 
party at her home Jan. 19, with her 
sister-in-law, Mrs. Yuia Chinn as hostess. 
Those present were: Miss Daisy Kwan, 
and Mesdames Henry Wong, Daniel 
Goon, Lonnie Woo Leong, Frank Kim, 
Henry Goon, David Mar and Eugene 
Wong. 

Seattle's Chinese Boy Scouts, Troop 
54 in the City Council, are planning 
another active winter program under 
Scoutmaster Emery Andrews. Jimmie 
Mar, Willie Sing and Ben Lum are the 
new co-senior patrol leaders for this year. 
The troop, which since its inception in 
1923 has compiled a remarkable record, 
at present has 27 members. 

The Chinese night school, where Eng- 
lish is taught to newcomers to this coun- 
try, has an average attendance of fifteen 
boys every night, under instruction of 
teachers from the Young People's or- 
ganizations of the various Baptist Chur- 
ches in the city. On Thursday, young 
members of the Chinese Baptist Church 
help their brethrens to learn the rudi- 
ments of the English language. 

University of Washington's Chinese 
Students' Club held its first meeting of 
the winter quarter at the home of Miss 
Frances Lew, Friday evening, Jan. 18. 
Twelve members were present to hear 
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Baptist students' ad- 
visor, speak on his recent tour of the 
East. Informal chats and refreshments 
concluded the evening. 

• • 

SURPRISE GRADUATION PARTY 

Last week, at the home of Dolly Wong, 
the Waku Auxiliary Juniors sprang a 
surprise graduation party to three of 
their members who are leaving Technical 
High School. The graduating trio are 
Marguerite Lum, president of the Jun- 
iors; Stella Lew, vice-president; and Lu- 
ella Chinn, sturdy guard on the bas- 
ketball team. During the course of the 
evening the girls enjoyed games, cards, 
mah jong, and finished with the inevi- 
table refreshments. 



York stages will also be present at the 
Chitena dance .... that the WAKU 
AUXILIARY dance is Aue on the 25th 
(Gosh, what a busyweek-end!) .... 
SO-O-O, until next week . . . .So Long. 



£150 FINE PAID IN FLAG 
DEFILING CASE 

Frank Gottstein, plumber of 224 8th 
Street, Oakland, yesterday paid a £150 
fine on a flag defiling charge to terminate 
a case which had been hanging fire in 
the courts since last September when 
Gottstein ripped an American and a Chi- 
nese flag from the building of the Chi- 
nese National League headquarters, 218 
Eighth Street. 

Gottstein was arrested at the instance 
of D. C. Waun, Chinese vice-consul. The 
act took place during a celebration by 
Chinese Boy Scouts. 



CHINESE CLUB SPONSORS 
ESSAY CONTEST 

The Ging Hawk Club, Chinese organi- 
zation in New York, is sponsoring an 
English essay contest for Chinese boys 
and girls living in the United States or 
the Territory of Hawaii whose ages are 
between 17 and 25. 

"Does My Future Lie in America or 
China?" is the subject title of this in- 
teresting writing contest. A first prize 
of twenty dollars will be awarded to the 
boy or girl who turns in the best essay on 
this subject. Each essay should not run 
under 1000 or over 1500 words. A se- 
cond prize of ten dollars will also be 
given for the next best essay. 

This contest will close on March- 31, 
and the winners will be announced some- 
time in April. Information regarding 
the rules of this contest may be obtained 
by writing directly to the Ging Hawk 
Club, 32 Mott St., New York City. 



MARIAN DONG ENTERTAINS 

The Senior Team having won the 
Watsonville Union High School Basket- 
ball Championship, Marian Dong, cap- 
tain, entertained her team-mates and 
captains of the other teams with a chow 
mein dinner at Soo Chow Tea Room. 

Miss Louise Blanchard. physical edu- 
cation director, and Miss Dong congrat- 
ulated and thanked the girls on their 
good team work and cooperation. 

The dining room was decorated in the 
atmosphere of a basketball court, the 
baskets, draped with red and white, the 
senior colors. Miss Mary Lee. ■ local 
Chinese girl, entertained the group with 
a tap number. Dancing concluded the 
evening. , 



January 24, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 7 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



CERAMIC ART 

(IX) Elimination of Spurs — Ring and 
Sand 

Certain Sung potters, among them the 
Ch'ien and Lung Ch'uan potters, brought 
about an innovation. A ring of unglazed 
biscuit was left on the upper surfaces of 
all vessels which were to be stacked for 
firing. These rings were large enough 
to accomodate the foot rim of the vessels 
above, and in this way, were stacked 
without the use of spurs. However, the 
glazed area inside the ring, being sealed 
by the foot rim of the vessel above, often 
assumed a different color as the result 
of not having the same oxidation-reduc- 
tion process as the rest of the glaze, and 
so was not a very satisfactory process. 
However, many Kwangtung potters still 
use this method for their cheaper cela- 
dons. 

Cylindrical Rings 

It is probably the Lung Ch'uan potters 
which added still another improvement. 
When firing in stacks, as above, a cylin- 
drical tube or ring of fire clay was used 
to separate each plate or bowl. This 
decreased the number of spoilage, for in 
case of adhesion, it was an inexpensive 
procedure to chip the ring off the vessels. 

This ring was probably derived from 
the rattan ring used by Chinese cooks 
when steaming food. The wall of the 
ring varies greatly in size, many being 
about half an inch thick. 

Certain modifications of this cylindri- 
cal ring might be mentioned as improve- 
ments. Some rings were nicked at re- 
gular intervals, insuring ventilation and 
facilitating removal in case of adhesion. 
Similarly, some potters used the half 
rings, the two halves not quite touching 
each other. The edges of some rings 
were sharpened to razor keenness, re- 
ducing the point of contact to a mini- 
mum. This invariably resulted in ad- 
hesion, but the marks left on the biscuit 
was hardly more conspicuous than a 
wheel ring. By this time, the point of 
contact of all spurs were reduced to a 
minimum, becoming razor edges or pin 
points. 

In firing of vessels having legs, one 
would expect the terminals of the legs 
to be the logical spots which the vessels 
might rest. But such was not the case 
wih the Sung potters. It may be that 
the legs, being luted in place, were not 
firm enough to hold the vessels in posi- 

(Continued on Page 13) 



Remember When? 

Remember when New Year's Eve was 
a time of feverish preparation for the 
coming year — and not a time for whoo- 
pee or merriment? 

Several days before the old year ex- 
pired, everyone would be busy "spring 
cleaning". Then the Gods would be 
thanked (wan shen) with a simple offer- 
ing of incense, food, and prayer. On 
New Year's Eve the entire population 
would be out bargaining for water lilies, 
apricot blossoms, berries, and potted flow- 
ers. 

Then everyone from grandpa down 
would be arrayed in their finest brocade 
and embroideries. The children are 
dressed the most elaborate of all — with 
five colored aprons and lion-headed 
hoods (shi tau mo), decorated with the 
eight fairies (pa shen) fashioned of 
pure gold. 

The reception to the New Year takes 
place after midnight and consists in 
offering prayer, incense, candles, fruits, 
wines, and tea. Then would follow a 
simple meal (Feast of the Lantern) of 
incarnate food (chai), and the New 
Year is formally "opened" with the pop- 
ping of a small string of fire crackers. 

The first day is a solemn one of wor- 
ship, formal calls, offering of li-shees to 
the children, and dining on incarnate 
food. The second is Feast day. The 
seventh is "Man's Day" with the serving 
of fried dumplings, (jin-dui or chee) and 
of anchovie salad (yui shong) . During 
New Year everyone is of cheerful mien, 
and not a profane word escapes from 
even the most hardened criminals. The 
spiritual minded would purchase birds 
or some other pets and liberate them. 
The poorer people would merely liberate 
a ballon as a substitute. 

(Third of a series of 52 recordings of 
sociological and cultural changes taking 
place in Chinatown within a generation. 
Send in your observation.) 



J. C. Louie 

Optometrist 

• 

Hours: 10-6; Sat. Eve., 7-9 P.M. 
Sundays by Appointment 

621 Kearny Street 

San Francisco 



Chinese Inventions and 
Discoveries 

(VIII) The Chinese Invented Block 
Printing and Movable Type Printing. 

The earliest seal impressions are to be 
found on the pottery jugs of the Chou 
Dynasty. By the Ts'in Dynasty, seals 
were used much as they are used today, 
except that the impression is left on a 
lump of clay instead of sealing wax. 
These seals were placed on all important 
contracts and documents. Shortly before 
the T'ang Dynasty, the Chinese substi- 
tuted cinnabar ink for the clay and the 
seal became a stamp — like the rubber 
stamp in use today. It is not considered 
"printing" because its purpose is authen- 
tication rather than duplication. Of in- 
terest is the fact that the modern rubber 
stamp is still associated with red ink. 

During the seventh century these seals 
evolved into large wooden blocks for 
printing Buddhist charms. These charms 
contain both pictures and religious text. 
This is the earliest instance of block 
printing, although a century earlier, the 
Taoists had similar seals, but as far as 
is known, they were for use in stamping 
impressions on the ground only. (Even 
today, some Tibetians use similar seals 
for "stamping" prayer on water in order 
to acquire merit) . 

The earliest extant block printing is 
to be found in Japan. They are charms 
and date back to 770 A. D. The pro- 
cess was borrowed from the Chinese, it 
being part of the Sino-Buddhist complex. 
The Japanese block prints, so popular 
in the West today, is also from China, 
but represented a later or T'ang Dynasty 
importation. The earliest extant printed 
work in China was found by Sir Aural 
Stein at Tun Huang. This is the famous 
"Diamond Sutra", a religious work in 
the form of a roll, sixteen feet long. The 
classics were printed under the direction 
of Feng Tao, a project which required 
twenty-one years to complete (932-953 
A. D.) The national history and the 
Buddhist canon, printed about that 
time, were also voluminous works, the lat- 
ter containing 130,000 pages. The most 
artistic books were printed during the 
Sung Dynasty. 

The beginning of movable type print- 
ing occurred in 1041-1049 A. D. when 
one Pi Sheng made type of moulded 
earthenware. The type was set in an 
iron form or tray, the bottom of which 
contained melted tar. After the type had 

(Continued on Page 13) 



Page 8 



CHINESE DICEST 



January 24, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, $2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, $2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 

STAFF 

CHING WAH LEE Associate Editor 

WILLIAM HOY Associate Editor 

FRED GEORGE WOO Sports 

CLARA CHAN Fashions 

ETHEL LUM Community Welfare 

ROBERT G. POON Circulation 

GEORGE CHOW Advertising 



Fame and Fortune For You 

Right here in California opportunities are ready for 
the alert Chinese. Fortunes will be made introducing 
Chinese commodies to the American homes and cafes 
at a fair profit. In the West, a penniless Korean, aided 
by a few Chinese friends, built up a huge fortune dis- 
tributing the lowly Chinese beansprouts to the public. 
In Chinatown, besides bean sprouts, we have condi- 
ments, sauces, preserves, meats, vegetables, and hun- 
dreds of suitable items. Therein is a chance to build 
up a new line of business. 

This opportunity is enhanced by the announcement 
of a free course in practical industrial chemistry, to be 
given by Dr. F. Y. Chuck. We are proud to have the 
opportunity of working with him in finding new jobs 
and new sources of income for the younger generation. 

Upon his graduation from Stanford University, Dr. 
Chuck turned down a university professorship in order 
to prove that well trained Chinese have opportunities 
in the industries. He entered hostile Petaluma and 
offered to teach them chicken feeding. Those ranchers 
nearly died of laughing — the idea of a young China 
school boy improving on God. Yet in less than six 
month's time he had them feeding out of his hands. 
His monthly lecture on nutrition is packed. Today 
he maintains a large staff which supplies the industry 
with special dietary feeds and correctives. 



IMPROVEMENT 

In the discharge of the ordinary duties of life and 
in the exercise of care in ordinary conversation, when- 
ever there is shortcoming, never fail to strive for im- 
provement, and when there is much to be said, always 
say less than what is necessary; words having respect 
to actions and action having respect to words. Is it 
not just this thorough genuineness and absence of pre- 
tense which characterizes the moral man? 
Confucius 



Chinese New Year Thoughts 

KUNG HAY, FAT CHOY! 

A burst of firecrackers, a lion dance, and colorful 
street stands — which means once again the old Chinese 
New Year makes its bow in Chinatown. 

And all good friends should hasten to come forth 
and view and celebrate it, because ere long, such scenes 
will be just a memory, and another old Chinese cele- 
bration will have vanished. Although the Nanking 
government has accepted the solar calendar, the China- 
towns throughout the United States are slow in adopt- 
ing the change. 

After four score years of seeing the American peo- 
ple celebrate their New Year, and then preparing for 
their own, it is quite hard to change — old folks because 
their customs have been set for these many years; and 
young folks because it gives them an excuse for another 
holiday — another week of merrymaking. 

Little children will come out, gayly bedecked in 
colorful costumes, and the whole air will be filled with 
a spirit of festivity. Tongs and associations will be 
brilliant with a hundred electric lights. And near the 
close of the holidays, the money put aside for fire- 
crackers and celebration will take its fling. For hours 
the streets will be filled with the din of "baby" crackers, 
giant crackers, and other niosemakers which will be 
used to drive evil spirits away. 

Babies, their pockets and chubby hands filled with 
the stain of handling "li-shees", tokens of good luck 
and prosperity, enclosed in red Chinese paper, sigh 
happily, and nibble away on sugared melon. Older 
children, utilizing the "prosperity coins", buy fire- 
crackers and add their "pops" to those of their elders. 

Young men and women will be at dances and private 
functions, waltzing to the music of famous orchestras, 
and the Waku and Chitena organizations will boast of 
their special orchestras. 

Our fathers and uncles, closing business on the one 
holiday for them the year round, and loaded with 
tangerines and oranges, choose this time to make that 
visit to each of our friends and relatives, to partake 
of tea, and exchange greetings in their own inimitable 
way. It is interesting to observe that during the entire 
week, not even a whisper of adversity is voiced or 
allowed. There is happiness and a sense of prosperity 
all around. 

\Ve lay aside our cares, for the holidays are here. 
KUNG HAY, FAT CHOY! 



January 24, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



P»*e 9 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY 



TING WEN CHIANG, 
SCIENTIST AND 
PHILOSOPHER 

The recent untimely death of Dr. Ting 
Wen-chiang, more familiarly known as 
V. K. Ting, one time director of the 
China Geological Survey for many years, 
is a loss keenly felt by those who, working 
quietly in laboratories, or doing pain- 
staking field research work, are contri- 
buting much to the scientific knowledge 
of China's resources and history. 

To many in and outside of China V. 
K. Ting was mostly known as a noted 
geologist and a mining expert. But Dr. 
Ting, like many educated Chinese, scien- 
tist or otherwise, was also a philosopher. 
As such he had thought for many years 
about the kind of religion China must 
have in order to rebuild her civilization. 
Like many other great western scientists 
he, too, had thought long and deeply 
over the compatibility between science 
and religion. 

In 1923 Dr. Ting wrote a paper called 
"Science and Our Philosophy of Life", 
in which he stated his philosophical be- 
lief, and advocated that the search for 
the ultimate truth of the universe by 
scientific methods should be the new re- 
ligion for China. 

This particular paper was published in 
a weekly which was then edited by Dr. 
Hu Shih, also a philosopher and edu- 
cator, whose own views regarding science 
and religion were somewhat similar to 
Dr. Ting's. At that time Hu Shih was 
teaching and advocating with great suc- 
cess, the pragmatic philosophy he had 
learned in America from John Dewey. 
A Philosophical Controversy 

Dr. Ting's article started a philoso- 
phical controversy in which practically 
all the scholars and philosophers of mo- 
dern China took part. Divers religions 
and philosophies were expounded, 
preached, and advocated by these in- 
tellectuals, ranging all the way from as- 
theticism to yogism. 

This controversy lasted almost a 
year. The articles were later collected 
and published as a book. The collection 
contains about two hundred thousand 
words; and when Hu Shih wrote an 
introduction to the book another ten 
thousand words were added. 

Hu Shih's Introduction 

This controversy begun by V. K. 
Ting's paper served to reveal the in- 
tellectual temper and philosophical mood 

Patronize Our 



of China at that time. Hu Shih best 
defined this new philosophy in his intro- 
duction to the book which contained the 
controversial papers. He wrote: 

"On the basis of biological, sociologi- 
cal, and historical knowledge, we should 
recognize that the individual self is sub- 
ject to death and decay, but the sum 
total of individual achievement, for bet- 
ter or worse, lives on in the immortality 
of the Larger Self; that to live for the 
sake of the species and posterity which 
seek a future life in Heaven or in the 
Pure Land are selfish religions. 

"This new credo is a hypothesis foun- 
ded on the generally accepted scientific 
knowledge of the last two or three hun- 
dred years. To avoid unnecessary con- 
troversy, I propose to call it, not a 
'scientific credo,' but merely 'the Natural- 
istic Conception of Life and the Uni- 
verse.' 

" . . . . this naturalistic conception of 
the universe and life is not necessarily 
devoid of beauty, of poetry, of moral 
responsibility, and of the fullest oppor- 
tunity for the exercise of the creative 
intelligence of man." 

Little Self, Big Self 

In other words, Hu Shih, like many 
other intellectuals of the time, believes in 
what he calls the immortality of society. 
In this philosophy each individual is a 
little self, and society is the big self. 
"All the little selves may die out, but 
the big self is immortal," he wrote at 
one time, "Although these little selves 
become extinct, yet all the words spoken 
and all the deeds done by each of these 
little selves, whether they are virtuous 
or vicious, big or small, right or wrong, 
will all leave their record in this big 
self. The big self is the memorial tab- 
let of, as well as the sentence of con- 
demnation passed on all the little selves. 
It is eternal, so all that is done by the 
little selves is eternal." 

And against this new philosophical 
and, to Hu Shih, new religious belief, 
• • 

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a Chinese Christian once criticised him, 
saying that "his treatment of the subject 
is too cold, too philosophical and lacking 
in incentive. He ignores the idea of a 
personal God and entirely leaves out of 
account the belief in the personality of 
man. He may call the immortality of 
society his own religion and be himself 
contented with it. But his religion can- 
not be the religion of the common pe- 
ople. They want to have a God who 
loves them, is in communion with them 
and gives them comfort when they are 
in trouble, sorrow, and need. Man is 
not only a rational being, he is also an 
emotional being. He not only thinks, 
he is also able to feel. It is to sublimate 
his feelings and hence to enrich the 
whole life that religion comes in, 
while a cold and materialistic conception 
of the human life makes life tasteless 
and leads man to nowhere." 

The Chinese take to philosophy more 
seriously than they take cold science, 
although Lin Yu-tang has said that they 
"never go far in anything." However, 
long after V. K. Ting's work as a geolo- 
gist will have been forgotten by posterity, 
he will be remembered as the man who 
started a philosophical controversy which 
lasted a year and which resulted in the 
setting down of the philosophical and re- 
ligious beliefs of China's modern intellec- 
tuals. 

• • 

The Manchu Abdication and the Pow- 
ers, 1908-1912. By John Gilbert Reid. 
497 pages. University of California 
Press, Berkeley. $5.00. 

A chronological history, well organi- 
zed, of the events leading up to the dis- 
solution of the Manchu dynasty and the 
part which Japan, Russia, United States, 
France and Great Britain play in it. 
Most people know that China has suf- 
fered much from Japan, but this book 
reveals how much China also suffered 
from western powers during the closing 
years of the Manchu regime. The book 
has a bibliography, notes, index, and map. 

• • 

Economic Geography of Asia. By 
Daniel R. Bergsmark. 618 pages. Pren- 
tice-Hall, New York. $5.00. 

A thoroughly good book, but a pro- 
duct of extensive research rather than of 
first hand acquaintance with the coun- 
tries dealt with. Of all the Asiatic poli- 
tical units considered in this book, China 
takes the most space, covering 110 pages. 
It is factually accurate but lacks inter- 
pretation. 
Better Paper 



Page 10 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 24, 1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



BOYS' WORK AT THE 
Y. M. C. A. 

"The building of a man's character 
has its foundation in the training of his 
youth. A twisted sapling can never 
grow into an upright tree." With simi- 
lar words, our forefathers exhorted an- 
xious parents in the upbringing of their 
offsprings. 

As a result of the influence of city 
life and the conflict of older generation 
demands with younger generation desires 
for freedom, family life in Chinatown 
is showing signs of disintegration. It 
is increasingly necessary for institutions 
other than the home to shoulder the re- 
sponsibility of moral education of the 
young. In answer to this challenge, the 
Chinese Y. M. C. A. endeavors, through 
its work with boys, to give guidance to 
growing boyhood. The Christian Citi- 
zenship Program that it conducts makes 
a special effort to reach those boys be- 
tween the ages of eight and seventeen. 
Since this age range represents the period 
when a boy's associates exert the greatest 
influence on his thought and behavior, 
the program is essentially one of fellow- 
ship and group activities. 
Age Groups 

The boys are divided into three age- 
groups, roughly corresponding to suc- 
ceeding stages of physical and mental 
growth: from 8 to 11, 12 to 14, and 15 
to 17. The Friendly Indians, the Pion- 
eers, and the Comrades are the names 
applied to the respective divisions. With- 
in each division are organized clubs with 
memberships from 12 to 25, each under 
the direction of an adult leader. The 
small groups facilitate closer and friend- 
lier relations among the boys and be- 
tween leaders and boys. 

Four Phase Development 

The clubs have been known by the 
general name of Four-fold, for their 
motto and purpose is the four-phase 
development of a boy's life: spiritual, 
intellectual, physical, and social. 

Besides the regular weekly meetings of 
these clubs, many social and recreational 
periods are planned. It is the duty of 
the leaders to study the personality and 
environment of his individual boys, and 
to plan a program which will lead to the 
maximum development of their potential 
abilities. 

It is through well-planned and well 
supervised group activities that socially 
desirable habits and traits of good citi- 



Church Calendar 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNION 

The Chinese Young People's Union 
will hold a joint service with the Chi- 
nese Christian Union Church, on Jan. 
26, 8:00 p. m., at the Chinese Baptist 
Church, 15 Waverly Place. 

Rev. T. T. Taam, on a visit to San 
Francisco, will be the guest speaker. He 
was recently ordained in Los Angeles 
and is pastor of the Chinese Congrega- 
tional Church of that city. 

Preceding the union service, the young 
people will hold a fellowship hour in 
the social room of the Baptist Church, 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

• 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MINC CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER b CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 



zenship are most naturally developed. 
Since the Chinese Y. M. C. A. is today 
a center of great attraction to young 
boys, their moral guidance rests almost 
entirely upon the ability of these group 
leaders to do their work well. 



Raymond Chung, student at Francisco 
Junior High School, was awarded an 
American Legion medal for citizenship 
and scholarship at the graduation exer- 
cises last night. 



FIRECRACKERS 



This column is conducted for 
the benefit of our readers, under 
which they may submit suggestions 
and comments on any and all 
topics pertaining to the Chinese 
people or country. 



Chinese Y. W. C. A. 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Dear Editor: 

We see the urgent need of the unifi- 
cation of language for all China. The 
present trend is to have Mandarin as 
the universal language. For this reason, 
all Chinese especially young Chinese, 
should learn Mandarin. 

The Y. W. C. A. will have the coop- 
eration of Consul-General Huang who 
will ask Mr. Shih to teach Mandarin to 
a group of at least 20 young people. . . 
may I have your co-operation to invite 
them to such a class? 

The class will meet once a week for 
one hour suitable to all concerned; and 
it will be open to men and women free. 
Personally, I am anxious to have the 
class start as soon as possible. Your 
help will be greatly appreciated. 
Sincerely yours. 



Jane Kwong Lee. 
Co-ordinator. 



Jan. 17, 1936 



BREAKFAST GROUP 

The following officers were elected for 
1936 for the Chinese Young People's 
Christian Breakfast Group: 

Chairman, Thomas Horn; assistant 
chairman, Alice Fong; secretary-treasur- 
er, Dora Jeung. 

At the next meeting of the group, 
9:00 a. m. Jan. 26, at the Chinese Y. W. 
C. A., T. Y. Tang, executive secretary of 
the Chinese Y. M. C A. will speak. 
Victor Young, who recently attended 
the Students' Volunteer Convention at 
Indianapolis, Indiana, will give a report 
of what was accomplished at the Con- 
vention. 

• • 

In the crop area in China — that is, 
land cultivated or tillable — the pop- 
ulation density is 1,307 persons per 
square mile or 504 persons per square 
kilometer of land. 



January 24, 1-936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Pace 11 



FASHIONS 



CLARA CHAN 



THE CHINESE NOTE 

By Li Ta Ming 

We younger Chinese are apt to forget 
our own fashions and the charm about 
them in the enthusiasm of perhaps the 
new mannish type suits or the Grecian 
influence in evening gowns. We cannot 
put too much stress on the fact that we 
should always keep our national person- 
ality in front, that is to say — where girls 
and fashions are concerned we should 
always try to add an oriental touch to 
our costume, no matter how modern it 
may be. 

If it is the new fob-pin for your lapel 
why not have it made of Chinese gold? 
A pair of carved jade buddhas made into 
a set of clips, set in Chinese gold, of 
course, would make a charming and no- 
vel addition to your evening gown. Most 
of us have jade pins and family heir- 
loom whatnots put away that can be 
utilized to add beauty and distinction to 
our wardrobes. The old-fashioned rat- 
tan and gold bracelets that most of you 
now scorn to wear would look lovely 
with the new greens and Srowns being 
shown. If only you would have your 
next outfit made with a hint of old China 
in it! A set of real Chinese buttons in- 
stead of pearl buttons — or a large made- 
to order frog for your belt buckle instead 
of an imitation rhinestone clasp. Chinese 
dressmakers are so reasonable, too. 

Hat styles are also being shown with 
the oriental touch. Coolie hat — man- 
darin hats, and one even sees an authen- 
tic "duc-duc mo" marching gaily down 
the street atop some American woman's 
head. We shouldn't let westerners beat 
us to our own styles — which are right 
in our grasp while we pass them up for 
Carnegie models and such! Who knows 
but what we can start a new fad with 
our Chinese bracelets and buttons and 
also add to the coffers of our illustrious 
countrymen at the same time. Heaven 
knows they need some new fad to help 
them out, what with the Japanese ba- 
zaars edging us right out of our own 
domain. 

Living in a western world, we are in- 
clined to adapt ourselves too well to it, 
and forget our parent country and all 
it holds for us. There is no other race 
that can, or may be expected to, wear 
Chinese gowns with the distinction and 
natural grace that we can; and many has 



Ask the Woman in Gray! I Saw You 



Gray will take a place on the rainbow 
of color that heralds each Spring, and 
will be staunchly supported by smart wo- 
men. From swanky gunmetal tones to 
light grays, watch for the appearance of 
the color in suits, coats, fabric, accessor- 
ies, and yes, also in evening dresses. 

In the line of fabric, you will see 
grays in plaid mixtures, blurred checks, 
gray taffetas, sheer wool, sheer silk, and 
stripes. 

It is well to remember that certain 
tones of gray combine with black makes 
a distinctive outfit. With brightly col- 
ored accessories such as belts, bags, scarfs, 
handkerchiefs, and the new gloves of 
cerise, bright blue, and green, remember 
to know your grays in order to contrast 
these colors properly. 

Instead of the conventional combina- 
tion of red with gray, try emerald green, 
and wear a jade clip, and jade ring with 
your new gray outfit. If the outfit is a 
sport suit, wear your gray peaked hat 
with colored feathers, a gray sweater and 
a colored scarf. 

One of the most effective ensembles I 
have seen was of two tone effect. The 
skirt of dark gray was combined with a 
fitted short jacket of light gray with col- 
lar and lapels of the same dark tone as 
the skirt. 

• • 



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girls appear in public in Chinese dress. 
It is our heritage and these clothes were 
designed for the Chinese figure! Sounds 
egotistical, doesn't it? But it is true, 
nevertheless, so let's admit it and try to 
stick to our own Chinese modes and 
styles as much as possible. 



Walking up Sacramento Street during 
"time off" from H. Liebes, the tall and 
sophisticated Dorothy Tong wore a black 
two-piece wool suit trimmed with a nar- 
row piping of black persian lamb, a 
smart kid leather belt cleverly designed 
to give an effect of two firm rolls added 
smartness to this simply cut suit. 

Miss Tong wears with this costume a 
small gros grain turban with a tiny rhine- 
stone ornament and her suede accessor- 
ies of exquisite quality completed this 
outfit. 

What would be more suitable than a 
tailored suit for the business woman? 
That is exactly what Miss Anna Chan 
wears during business hours, her mannish 
jacket of navy blue with contrasting skirt 
of blue checks is not only smart but ser- 
viceable as well. She chooses a white 
pique blouse with a small stiff bow to 
wear with this suit and blue gabardine 
shoes with the comfortable cuban heels. 
This costume was tapped off with a pert 
little hat of the same material as the 
skirt. Being a very capable insurance 
woman, Miss Chan also has excellant 
taste for clothes. 

Knitting in a theatre? Mrs. Charles 
Chan, nee Sadie Fong, did exactly that! 
One wave of her magic knitting needles 
and she would turn balls and balls of yarn 
into dresses, suits, and coats. This tal- 
ented young matron knitted for herself a 
two piece dress of fine rust colored yarn, 
the blouse with long sleeves and a small 
peter pan collar on which she clips a 
gold pin of her initial. The skirt is 
plain and fits beautifully. On top of 
this dress she would wear a short coat 
of brown medium weight yarn which 
Mrs. Chan also expertly knitted. Well, 
girls, it seems knitting is very much in 
vogue. Better get busy and start on 
some sleeveless sweater for the summer, 
if you're not very good at it. I wouldn't 
try knitting in a theatre, in the beginning. 



Happy and Prosperous 
New Year 

THE JADE 

BEAUTY SHOP 

850 JACKSON ST. - CHina 2155 



been the envious word spoken when our 

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Page 12 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Janwry 24. 1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo- 



Scouts vs. Pick Team 
of League 

French Court will be the scene of bat- 
tle this Sunday evening between the Wah 
Ying Tournament Champion, the Troop 
Three Varsity, and the Pick Team of 
the League, with the preliminary slated 
for 7:00 p. m. with the Married and 
Single Men fives of the club clashing. 

Coach Don Lee of the Varsity will 
most likely start the squad that has been 
playing the most during league play. 

Forwards will be Hin Chin and Henry 
Kan, with Earl Wong at center. Steve 
Leong and Don Lee or Silas Chinn will 
take the guard posts. Although the 
Varsity will be favored to win, a tight 
game is expected, with the Pick Team 
most determined to come out on the 
long end of the final score, for the dis- 
tinction of downing the title- winners. 

Line-up for the League Team has not 
been as yet announced. It is reported 
that these men may start, Ho of Nulite 
and Ted Lee, Chi-Fornians, or Charlie 
Hing of Shangtai, forwards; Gerald Le- 
ong, Shangtai, center; and Fred Gok, 
Shangtai, and Daniel Leong, Nulite, as 
guards. 

The Married Men have been definitely 
installed as favorites to beat the Singles, 
in the first contest of the evening, due 
to the lack of reserves on the latter team. 
Possible starting line-ups: Married Men, 
Harry Lum and Daniel Yee, forwards; 
George Lim, center; Herbert Lee and 
James Jung, guards. . Singles: Othel 
Mammon and Fred Chin, forwards; Da- 
vid Kimlau, center; and Herbert Louie 
and Edward Mock, guards. 
• • 

San Jose Defeats 
Missouri 

San Jose's Chinese quintet gave an- 
other hefty boost to their stock when 
they defeated the St. Louis, Missouri 
five, a barnstorming American outfit 
from the middlewest, by a 24-20 count, 
January 18, at the Roosevelt Jr. High 
School gymnasium in San Jose. 

Sharpshooting Harry Lee personally 
accounted for 14 out of his team's 24 
for high point honors of the evening. 

This is the second straight win of the 
season for the San Jose boys. At present, 
they are attempting to arrange a game 
with the Sacramento Chinese. 

Patronize Our 



Low a A. C. 

Lowa Athletic Club of Los Angeles 
has entered in the Southern California 
Basketball League, being the only Chi- 
nese team in the entry list. Strengthened 
by the addition to the team, of George 
Wong, formerly of San Francisco's Nan- 
wah Club, the Lowa A. C. is sweeping 
through the opposition. 

The Spartan Japanese team was among 
the victims to bow to Lowa, the Chinese 
cagers winning 33-22, in a league con- 
last Sunday evening. Led by George 
Wong, who scored 18 points, Lowa de- 
feated the Columbia Studios by a tally 
of 40-28. 

Shangtai Games 

Shangtai's cage team scored another 
easy victory in their City Recreation 
League schedule by swamping the strong 
Joan of Arc five 43-26 at the Francisco 
Court last week. 

Score at the half favored the Chinese, 
22-12. Allan Lee Po with 14 points 
and Fred Gok with ten were Shangtai's 
high pointers. Charles Hing and George 
Lee were also outstanding in their all- 
around performance. 

The team was virtually robbed of a 
victory and a possible championship 
when poor arbitering caused the Chinese 
team to drop a 34-32 decision to the 
Sunset Majors Monday night at the 
Francisco Court in another City Recrea- 
tion League contest. 

Captain Hing, with ten points, was 
Shangtai's high scorer. George Lee and 
Fred Gok turned in impressive perform- 
ances. On Monday, Jan. 27, the team 
meets the Norsemen, and Shangtai 
should win, providing a decent referee 
is the third party. 

• • 



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Portland Girls Best 
Seattle Five 

Chung Wah Girls' basketball team of 
Portland, Oregon, invaded Seattle Jan. 
12 to administer a 22-16 defeat to the 
Chinese Girls' club at the Y. W. C. A. 
court. The fair maids from the City of 
Roses were feted afterwards at a dance 
at the Chung Wah Hall, sponsored by 
the Seattle girls. 

The Seattle girls' team expect to invade 
Portland in the near future to avenge 
this beating. Those expected to make 
the trip are: Jessie Doung, Helen Hong, 
Lily Chinn, Captain Mary Luke, Pris- 
cilla Hwang, Molly Locke, Rose Woo, 
Mamie Locke, Josephine Chinn, Mildred 
King and Delia Eng. 

• • 

Washington U. Chinese 
Wins Championship 

A handful of Chinese students, re- 
presenting the University of Washington, 
captured the Northwest Chinese Basket- 
ball Championship in a tournament held 
on Jan. 2 and 3 at the Y. M. C. A. gym. 
The tournament, the first of its kind in 
the Northwest, was accomplished through 
the combined efforts of four teams; the 
other three competing in the tourney be- 
ing the Waku Celestials and Young China 
of Seattle and the Chinese Eagles of 
Portland. 

Members of the title-winning team are: 
Captain Eddie Luke, James Luke, Henry 
Luke, Herbert Wong, Al Tom, Tom 
Hong, Kaye Hong and Frank Nipp. 

• • 

LEADING LEAGUE SCORERS 

Individual high-scoring honors, as 
compiled by George Lim, member of the 
Wah Ying Athletic Committee, was won 
by Earl Wong of the championship Scout 
Varsity five, followed closely by Charlie 
Hing, captain of the Shangtai team. 
Earl made 51 points in the four con- 
tests, an average of nearly 13 per game. 
Charlie had a total of 42 points. Third 
place was captured by Henry Kan, Var- 
sity, with 39 points. Other high-scorers 
are: Fred Wong and Gerald Leona. 
Shangtai, both 38 points; Jack Look. 
Chi-Fornians, 27; Wilfred Jue, Nulite, 
25; Fred Gok, Shangtai, 24; Hin Chin, 
Varsity, 23; Charles Low, Scout Juniors, 
23; Ted Lee, Chi-Fornians. 23. and 
George Lee, Shangtai, 21. 



Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



January 24, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 13 




FOUL SHOOTING CONTEST 

Entries for the Chinese Y. M. C. A. 
second annual Foul Shooting Contest 
will close on Jan. 27. The contest, which 
will be held on Jan. 30, are divided into 
nine classes, termed by weights: 70, 80, 
90, 100, 110, 120, 130 and 145 pounds 
and unlimiteds. 

Twenty-five tries will be recorded as 
the official score. Individual basketballs 
will be awarded for first, second and third 
places in each class. The contest is 
under the direction of Leland Crichton, 
physical director. 

• • 
SCOUT JUNIORS LOSE 

Troop Three Scout Juniors lost a hard- 
fought contest to the Jewish Community 
Center lightweight basketfball five, 31-27. 
Trailing at half time 19-9, the Chinese 
rallied strong in the second half to al- 
most overtake the victors. Ted Moy, 
with fifteen points, led the Scouts scor- 
ing attack. 

• • 

Peter Chan, former star basketeer, 
seemed to hfeve gained about twenty 
pounds while living in Sacramento. 

Jack Look suddenly seemed to be in- 
terested in the fair sex. Rumors have 
it that he's looking for a partner to the 
Chinese New Year's dances. 

June Lau is the only Chinese girl 
playing in the Southern California Bas- 
ketball Tournament, performing for the 
Southwest Cafe girls' five. 

Fong K. Young, former Lowell High 
School broad-jump star, has transferred 
from the University of Illinois to Purdue 
University. Due to extensive studies, 
Fong has not engaged in sports actively. 

Teddy Lee, athlete, tap dancer, sign 
printer, harmonica player, etc. was re- 
cently appointed president of the Young 
Men's Division of the Chinese "Y". 



Salinas Chinese 

Six Chinese youngsters are making 
good in athletics at the Salinas High 
School, it was reported by one of our 
correspondents. Frank Chin was on the 
varsity football and is a member of the 
varsity basketball squad. Diamond Yee 
is on the cage team as well as the tennis 
squad. Three other Chinese boys are on 
the tennis team, Gage Wong, Jr. and 
the Chung brothers, Stanley and David. 
On the wrestling team is Moon Fong. 
George Young, former San Francisco 
boy, is playing on the Salinas Chinese 
hoop team. 

• • 

PALI DEFEATS WATSONVILLE 

Led by Won Loy Chan, center, the 
Chinese Students' Club of Stanford Uni- 
versity, in its first contest, defeated the 
Watsonville Chinese, 34-28, at the lat- 
ter's city Y. M. C. A. gym last Friday 
night. 

Richard Tarn and Yung Wong figured 
prominently in the scoring column for 
the peninsula team also, with King and 
Willie Lee playing a nice floor game. 
For Watsonville, Earl Goon and Walt 
Lee were outstanding on both defense 
and offense. 

• • 

One of the most underrated players 
in the basketball tournament recently was 
Stephen Leong, of the Scout Varsity 
team. A swell guard, he went through 
the games practically unsung, as was 
Howard Ho, of Nulite, who is a good 
all-around performer. 

CHINESE INVENTIONS AND 
DISCOVERIES 

(Continued from Page 7) 
set the tar was permitted to harden. This 
was soon followed by type of tin — the 
first metal type. The type was perforated 
on the side and an iron rod run through 
the type, holding them in place. Tin 
type did not prove successful because 
the Chinese ink did not work well with 
the metal. The Koreans were the first 
to have type of cast bronze, and they 
also developed a suitable ink for the 
metal type. 

Europe had block printing about 1400, 
and Gutengerg started movable type 
printing about fifty years later. Did 
Gutenberg get his idea from China? All 
indications are that the germ of the idea 
of both block printing and movable type 
printing came from China. The "poor 
man's bible" is surprisingly similar to 
the early religious text of China in style 
and arrangement. It is also printed on 



CERAMIC ART 

(Continued from Page 7) 
tion. A slight displacement of any one 
leg would result in a lop-sided vessel. 
Hence ring marks are often found on 
the base of these vessels. 

Mouth Rims and Foot Rims 

The Ting Chou potters brought about 
a radical change. These potters had an 
honorable tradition behind them, their 
wares receiving much praise during the 
T'ang Dynasty. It was quite natural 
that they should retain the inverted firing 
method inherited from the earliest time, 
although in some cases, especially with 
vases and jugs, the upright technique was 
used. In inverted firing, the glaze was 
made to fall short, not of the base, but 
of the mouth rim. It is practically cer- 
tain that they rested these bowls on a 
scattering of sand or other infusible sub- 
stances. The rim of the finished vessels 
were bound with a band of copper or 
silver for protection. Makers of certain 
Honan and ying ch'ing wares also adopt- 
ed this technique for their bowls. It is 
interesting to note that one Ting bowl, 
fired in the upright position, had a ring 
of sand mark on the base inside the 
foot rim which was glazed. 

It is but a step to change from resting 
wares on the mouth rim to the foot rim, 
and the makers of Kuan wares were pro- 
bably the first to adopt this method. In 
either case the ultimate success depended 
on resting the rims on a suitable layer of 
inert substance which guarded against 
adhesion, yet leaves no markings. Sand, 
ashes, or ground quartz were generally 
used. Ching-te Chen adopted this me- 
thod, and it soon became the most uni- 
versal one. Today, Ching-te Chen pot- 
ters separate their wares from the saggers 
with a disc of fire-clay over which is 
placed a thin layer of refined straw 
ashes, and the result is a "clean" foot 
rim. Spurs are like teeth: none in the 
beginning; irregular in childhood; and 
dissappearance in old age. 

Copyrighted. 1936, by Chingwah Lee 

(Next Week: Evolution of the Foot 
Rim.) 

one side of the paper only, and printed 
books were bound in the Chinese style. 
At that time Europe was in close contact 
with the Orient, and such printed matter 
as playing cards, charms, and paper 
money entered Europe. It is conceivable 
that the news of the success of the Korean 
printers reached Europe a half century 
later. 

(Next Week: The Chinese Invented 
Lithography.) 



Page 14 



CHINESE DIGEST 



January 24, 1936 



Oriental Institute of 
Hawaiian University 

In Honolulu, melting pot of Asian 
and Caucasian races, the University of 
Hawaii has launched a program aiming 
at the interpretation of Eastern civiliza- 
tion and culture to the West. Recently, 
it formed an Oriental Institute to impart 
"comprehensive instruction", both grad- 
uate and undergraduate, in the civiliza- 
tions of the East, with emphasis on 
China, India, and Japan. 

The course of study in this Institute 
will include Oriental art, history, lan- 
guages, literature, philosophy, and reli- 
gion. It hopes to conduct extensive re- 
searches and to arrange exchange of pro- 
fessors between Oriental and American 
universities. It plans also to offer 20 
research scholarships to graduates of 
twenty institutions of learning which give 
their students a good foundation in Or- 
iental studies. 

In founding this Institute the Univer- 
sity of Hawaii points out that the know- 
ledge and proper interpretation of the 
art, history, philosophy, literature, and 
religion of China, India and Japan 
should have far-reaching results and 
"may have as wonderful an effect on 
our civilization and thought as did the 
discovery of the Greek masterpieces after 
the fall of Constantinople; and that re- 
sulted in a complete reshaping of our 
standards of value — religiously in the 
Reformation and philosophically and 
artistically in the Renaissance." 

• • 

China is almost entirely dependent up- 
on imports for its petroleum products. 
The principal demands are for kerosene 
and fuel oil for heating and lighting. 
As a result of the growing use of auto- 
mobiles and other motor vehicles, the 
demand for gasoline is steadily increas- 
ing. Aviation gasoline is also in increas- 
ing demand. 

• • 

It has been estimated that 51.7 per 
cent of the farm land in China is worked 
by owners, 22.1 per cent by part owners 
and part tenants, and 26.2 per cent by 
tenants. Regionally, the proportion of 
tenants varies greatly: 30 per cent for 
the Northeast, 13 per cent for North 
China, and 40 per cent for South China. 

• • 

A daughter was born on Jan. 14 to 
the wife of Lee Yuen Goon, 644 Pacific 
St., San Francisco. 

Patronize Our 



HAWAIIAN-CHINESE GIRL 
ON WAY TO LOS ANGELES 

Li Ling Ai, a Chinese Hawaiian-born 
girl student, was a passenger on board 
the S. S. Lurline when that vessel docked 
at San Francisco last week from Hono- 
lulu. She is on her way to Los Angeles. 
Miss Li came to California to help Harry 
Carr, the Southern California columnist, 
write a book on Hawaii in which she 
was to furnish him with racial and his- 
torical background of the islands. While 
enroute, Carr passed away and the loss 
of this beloved friend was deeply felt 
by her. Although her plans are uncer- 
tain now, she continued on her way to 
Los Angeles. 



PALO ALTO BOYS ENTERTAINED 

After the basketball game on January 
17, on the Watsonville "Y" court, the 
Palo Alto boys were entertained at the 
Soo Chow Tea Room. 

The younger generation of the city 
gathered there and a chow mein and 
noodle "feed" was served with dancing 
until the early hours of the morning. 

Miss Bernice Hussey, formerly of Hon- 
olulu, did a hula dance and Richard Tam, 
of Palo Alto, joined her in doing the 
Hawaiian interpretation. 
• • 

A daughter was born on Jan. 9 to the 
wife of Chan Hung Bew, 730 Henry St., 
Oakland, Calif. 




VARIETY 
UNLIMITED! 

Every shoe in our stock, every style in our 
store, temporarily reduced for this short- 
time semi-annual event. And remem- 
ber, nothing is changed but the price. 

FIORSHEIM 

756 Market St. 680 Market St. 120 Powell St. .. 

San Francisco California . 

M 

Advertisers — They Help to Mal^e This a Bigger and Better Paper 



January 24. 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



Page 15 



Peace Advocate, 
Educator, Arrives 

One of the most prominent passengers 
arriving last week aboard the S. S. Hoo- 
ver was Li Yu-ying, president of the Na- 
tional Academy of Peiping and a member 
of the central supervisory committee of 
the Kuomintang Government. 

Mr. Li, a peace advocate, will sail for 
England, France and Switzerland for a 
lecture tour, following lectures in New 
York City in the interests of culture. 
While in America, he will attempt to 
establish a Chinese International Library. 

During his visit to Chinatown last 
week, he quoted to the Digest reporter 
that world peace could be preserved only 
by education. 

CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Feb. 4; President Taft (San 
Francisco) Feb. 12; President Cleve- 
land (San Francisco) Mar. 3; Presi- 
dent Hoover (San Francisco) Mar. 11; 
President Taft (San Francisco) Mar. 31; 
President Coolidge (San Francisco) 
Apr. 8. 

SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Hoover (San 
Francisco) Jan. 24; President Polk 
(San Francisco) Jan. 31; President 
Taft (San Francisco) Feb. 7; President 
Adams (San Francisco) Feb. 14; Presi- 
dent Coolidge (San Francisco) Feb. 21; 
President Harrison (San Francisco) 
Feb. 28. 



LOCOMOTIVES FOR 
CHINESE RAILWAY 

With the all-important Canton-Han- 
kow Railway rapidly nearing completion 
China placed an order with Britain not 
long ago for twenty-four more locomo- 
tives for this particular line. Recently 
the locomotives were shipped from Birk- 
enhead to China. 

These new locomotives were of the 
latest type. They weighed 200 tons each, 
with sixteen wheels, and about 100 feet 
long. Two years ago this same railway 
bought sixteen locomotives from Britain 
of the 4-8-4 type, with 4-4 type tenders, 
and weighed 111 tons. 

Most of the funds for the purchase of 
equipments from Britain for the Canton- 
Hankow Railway come from the British 
Boxer Indemnity Fund in the form of 
loans to China's Ministry of Railways. 



#300,000 SOUND-PICTURE STUDIO 
IN CAPITAL FORMALLY OPENED 

In the presence of over 500 high gov- 
ernment officials, Party leaders, and re- 
presentatives of various civic organiza- 
tions, the newly completed #300,000 talk- 
ing-picture studio of the Central Publi- 
city Committee was officially opened re- 
cently. 

In a short dedication address, Mr. Yeh 
Chu-tsang, Secretary-General of the Cen- 
tral Kuomintang Headquarters and con- 
currently chairman of the Central Pub- 
licity Committee pointed out that the 
aim of the Central Sudio is to produce 
pictures on the recommendation of the 
various organs of the Government, and 
to cooperate with privately-owned pic- 
ture studios in developing and promot- 
ing the native movie industry. 




The 
NEW 
CENTURY 
BEVERAGE 
COMPANY 

Wishes you joy 
and prosperity in 
the New Year. 



We suggest that you try a bottle of delicious 
SPARKLING CIDER. You will be delighted 
with this pure, healthful, tasty beverage. A 
quality product at an economical price. 

OTHER PRODUCTS 



PROMINENT MERCHANT DIES 

How Ho Hoang, prominent merchant 
of Monterey County, died in the San 
Francisco Chinese Hospital. A year ago, 
he was held up and assaulted by robbers, 
and despite the fact that he was 76 years 
old, he resisted the men, who hit him on 
the head. 

He suffered a brain concussion and 
' had since been gradually sinking, doctors 
c at the hospital reported. 

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Page 16 



CHINESE DIG EST 



January 24, 1936 



Here's a New Year's 
Dress -Up Saving 




Hart Schaff ner & 
Marx & Mansfield 

SUITS 

AND TOPCOATS 
$97.50 



1 



Li 






£5.00 
HATS 

$3.85 



£2.50 
SHIRTS 




m 



— you'll want to look your best 
New Year's. Here's how at a 
wholesouled saving. 

— styleful hand-tailored suits and 
topcoats now on Sale. All 
from trustworthy makers. 

— largest selection at £27.50. 
Others at £21.50, £24.50, and 
up to £44.50. 



•»••* MOORE\S 



£1.00 
TIES 

65c 



Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clotfh \ 

840 Market 141 Kearny * 1450 Bway 

Opp. Emporium Near Sutter Oakland 

(^Chi.iese Salesman here: Edward Leong) 




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(3 




ft WEEKLY PUBUCfVTlOW 



COMMENT- SOCIAL * -SCOUTS 
W£WS - - CULTUI2.S * - LlTERfcTUfcfi saw 



^H) 



Vol. 2, No. 5 



January 31, 1936 



Five Cents 



CURRENT NEWS ABOUT CHINA 



By Tsu Pan 



• WHO RECOGNIZED HIROTA'S 
NEW PRINCIPLES? 

• JAPANESE MILITARY PROGRAM 

• AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY 

• MENACE TO ECONOMIC WORLD 

Has Nanking already recognized Hirota's three 
fundamental principles in Sino-Japanese relations to 
stop anti-Japanese activities, to suppress communists, 
and to recognize "Manchukuo"? This was a matter 
of dispute in the Far Eastern political arena last week 
as versions from Chinese and Japanese sources showed 
wide discrepancy. 

In an address before Parliament, Japanese Foreign 
Minister Kori Hirota declared that the Nanking 
Government had already shown willingness to accept his 
principles. He advocated, therefore, a program for the 
readjustment of relationships between Japan, China 
and "Manchukuo" by which China will halt all 
unfriendly acts and measures toward Japan, liberate 
herself from the red menace, and recognize the status 
of "Manchukuo". 

In answer to the above assertion, the Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs in Nanking announced that China did 
not obligate herself to such demands and that China 
did not enter into any agreement with Japan "to 
readjust the relationships between China, Japan and 
'Manchukuo'." Any statement contrary to this is 
entirely without foundation, the Ministry declared. 

Alarmed over Nanking's reaction, the Japanese 
Foreign office immediately ordered General Aso Tani, 
Military Attache to the Japanese Embassy in China to 
call on General Chiang Kai-shek in order to obtain his 
viewpoint. What indications General Chiang Kai-shek 
revealed to General Tani was not learned. Whatever 
information General Tani might have obtained will 
eventually be in Foreign Minister Hirota's portfolio to 
serve as reference in outlining his future China policy. 

Not only is General Tani a diplomatic officer, but 
being a direct representative of the war office, he is 
responsible for gathering information for the use of 
the Minister of War. 

A group of high ranking Japanese war department 
officers are now penetrating the length and breadth of 



interior China in an attempt to get first hand 
information for military purposes, according to reports 
from various sources. Upon their return to Tokio, a 
conference will be held to decide upon a concrete 
policy toward China. At this conference, General Tani 
is expected to report on the following matters: 

1. To what extent has China suppressed the anti- 
Japanese activities? 

2. What should be Japan's future program in North 
China? 

3. What is the real intention of the Nanking Govern- 
ment in the coming Chinese Japanese conference 
in Nanking? 

4. What is China's attitude toward a Sino-Japanese 
military cooperation to suppress the communists? 

5. What is China's attitude toward the settle- 
ment of the pending issues between the two nations? 

According to political analysts, the essence of 
Japanese diplomatic and military policy toward China 
is to decentralize various regions of Chinese territory 
from the Central Government of China. They also 
believe three army groups now stationed in China will 
be instrumental in accomplishing the following objec- 
tives: 

1. The Japanese Kwantung Army shall help 
"Manchukuo" extend its territory, attempting to 
annex the provinces of Chahar and Suiyuan. "Manchu- 
kuo" will also prepare to invade Soviet Russia so as to 
remove this obstacle of Japan's Asiatic policy. 

2. The Japanese garrison forces in North China shall 
strengthen the status of the semi-autonomous regimes 
of Norh China. They shall also help them to develop 
communications in North China for military purposes. 

3. The military officers in South China shall attempt 
to control the political power of the province of Fukien, 
opposite the island of Formosa, so as to build a founda- 
tion for future development in South China. 



Aside from the military programs, it is believed the 
Japanese Government has also formulated detailed 
plans for economic penetration into China. The 
Japanese foreign office has recently increased its 
appropriation for "cultural expansion" in China in 
order to render China technical assistance in rural 
rehabilitation. "An industrial Japan and an agricul- 
tural China will co-exist in prosperity," is what the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



FAR EAST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



TSU PAN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Japanese claim. 

The Japanese agricultural program in 
North China includes the following: 

1. To achieve rural rehabilitation, sev- 
eral agricultural experimental stations 
shall be established in North China with 
Japanese experts as managers. These 
experts will study the local farming con- 
ditions and formulate rehabilitation pro- 
grams suitable to the locality. 

2. To secure dependable markets, 
North China shall have as its chief agri- 
cultural products, cotton and wool, in 
sufficient quantities to meet the demand 
of Japanese factories. Efforts should 
be made to improve and standardize the 
qualities of such products. 

3. To diversify the production in North 
China animal husbandry and manual 
industries shall also be encouraged. 

4. To impart new knowledge and tech- 
nique into modern farmers, the agricul- 
tural courses in the Chinese Japanese 
College in Tientsin shall be extended. 

5. Rural banks shall be opened to 
encourage farming co-ops and to finance 
farming projects. 



That the Japanese agricultural pro- 
gram in North China is not merely pa- 
per work is proved by the fact that lately 
fifty thousand dollars' worth of Ameri- 
can cotton seeds have already found its 
way into North China through the chan- 
nels of Japanese firms, according to a 
recent report. Japanese used to import 
American raw cotton for its essential 
quality of fine fibres. If Japan can pro- 
duce the American type of cotton in 
North China with the Oriental scale of 
wages, then, according to world econom- 
ists, it is inevitable that immeasurable 
suffering will soon be seen in American 
cotton belts and Lancashire textile mills. 

• • 

Canton, China — A recent mandate 
passed by the Bureau of Education in 
this city forbids students here to 
use foreign manufactured fountain pens 
and that, henceforth, they must return to 
the traditional Chinese brush for all 
writing purposes. In passing this regu- 
lation the Bureau of Education declared 
that to write Chinese characters well and 
beautifully the Chinese brush is unsur- 
passed. 

• • 

Dr. Kiang Kang-hu, noted Chinese 
scholar, recently made a three-month 
survey of the northwestern provinces 
to formulate plans for rehabilitation. 



$20,000,000 for Mass 
Education 

A total of $20,000,000 will be avail- 
able for use in the work of promoting 
mass education in China, according to 
reports submitted to the Ministry of Ed- 
ucation by the various provincial, muni- 
cipal and district authorities. 

These reports reveal that the various 
provinces, municipalities, and districts 
are co-operating closely with the Minis- 
try to carry out the detailed plans for 
the promotion of popular education as 
worked out recently by the Ministry. 

Of the $20,000,000, it is learned that 
$2,400,000 will be appropriated by the 
Central Government and $800,000 by 
the four Boxer Indemnity Refund Com- 
missions. The remainder of the sum will 
be raised by the various provinces, muni- 
cipalities and districts. 

Of the provinces, it is learned that 
Shantung and Kiangsi have decided to 
appropriate $800,000 each, Szechuan, 
Honan and Shensi $600,000 each; Ho- 
pei, Sinkiang, Kwangtung, and Yunnan 
$300,000 each. Some provinces have 
decided to appropriate from $10,000 to 
$200,000 each, thus making the total 
from all the provinces $9,300,000. 

In addition to the sum of $500,000 
appropriated by the Central Govern- 
ment for popular education in the fron- 
tier provinces, and other appropriations 
decided upon by the various municipali- 
ties and districts, the grand total will 
reach no less than $20,000,000. 

It is expected that a total of 48,936 
mass education schools will be established 
throughout China during the current 
fiscal year. 

• ♦ 

CITY PREPARES FOR RED ATTACK 

Sweeping the countryside as they ap- 
proached, a communist army of 30,000 
is expected to launch an attack on the 
city of Kwei-Yang, capital of Kweichow 
Province. 

Block houses and trenches are being 
dug around the city by soldiers as well 
as thousands of citizens, in preparation 
to resist the capture of the city by the 
Chinese Reds. 

• • 
PAGE PIED PIPER 

Mice recently sent the inhabitants 
of Schengchong, China, scurrying in- 
doors and caused cats and dogs to flee 
for safety as an army of mice, fifty thou- 
sand strong, passed through this town 
enroute to a new settlement. 



First Shipment of 

SPRING SUITS 

"Sweetens" Sale! 




Worsted Twist 

SUITS 



$ 



27 



.50 



• Pleat-back and Business Models 

• Hand-tailored; 4 Spring Shades 

• Range of Sizes to Fit All Men 

MOORE'S 



San Francisco: 

840 Market - - 141 Kearny 

Oakland: 1450 Broadway 

Chinese Salesman, Edw. Leong, 

at Kearny Street 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



Charmed, I'm Sure! 

"Popeye" is fond of saying "I YAM 
WHAT I YAM" and letting it go at 
that. There are some "Popeyes" in the 
world. Most of us, however, are much 
less self -satisfied; much more eager to 
find that elusive something which is 
known as charm or personality. With- 
out promising to work miracles, Mrs. Faye 
Goleman, consultant on the Y. W. C. A. 
staff, will give four informal talks on 
"PERSONALITY", tracing its bases and 
growth and indicating some of the means 
of developing those personality traits 
which are most desirable socially. 

The "PERSONALITY" talks are part 
of the 965 Club activities and will be 
open to all girls and young women in 
business and industry. The second talk 
will be held at the Chinese Y. W. C. A. 
on Tuesday, February 4, at 8:45 p. m. 
The 965 Club also offers a tap-dancing 
class on Tuesday evening from 8:00 to 
8:45 p. m. Registration for both activi- 
ties is twenty-five cents for ten weeks. 

• • 

Sportsmen Weekend Trips 

Although striped bass trolling off the 
Marin shores started two weeks ago, the 
catches have been scarce and spotty. 
Some nice catches were brought in, how- 
ever, by many local fishermen, and if 
weather conditions are favorable the next 
few days, better fishing will be in the 
offing. 

Two parties from the local Chinese 
Sportsmen Club went out last Sunday. 
The party comprised of Frank Chan, Fat 
Wong, Fred Jow and Winton Lee Yum 
brought in three bass weighing between 
eight to eleven pounds, one for each of 
the three former. It proved to be a 
costly trip for Winton, who hooked on 
to a doughnut. 

Another party led by Admiral Fok 
hauled in two bass, the larger one being 
a fifteen and a half pounder. This 
broke the ice for a certain member who 
has been jinxed by Winton for the past 
two years. However, Winton paid 
promptly and smiled like a sportsman. 

• • 
STUDENT HONORED 

To Raymond Chan, an Oakland high 
school student, goes the distinction of 
receiving one of the highest scholastic 
honors that a high school student can 
receive. Ray, who is a student at the 
Technical High School, and also secre- 
tary of the Oakland Crusaders organiza- 
tion, was awarded a $ 100.00 scholarship 
to the University of California. 



BENEFIT DRAGON DANCE 

For the purpose of raising funds for 
the Chinese Hospital to aid the poor 
and needy of the community, a dragon 
paraded through the streets of China- 
town to "eat" the contributions from 
merchants and generous individuals. 
Members of the Chinese Mandarin Thea- 
ter, headed by the committee from the 
hospital, participated in the dance. The 
East Bay Chinese witnessed the dragon 
dance and contributed their share on 
Wednesday. 









WM H 






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The Humane Dragon. (See Editorial.) 



DRAGON DANCE NETS #1,619.88 

Donations for the Chinese Hospital of 
San Francisco through the Dragon Dance 
held Monday and Tuesday netted a total 
amount of #1,619.88. Monday, the 
Dragon took in $805.53, while on Tues- 
day it brought in $814.35. The contri- 
butions were from the various Chinatown 
merchants, clubs, family associations, and 
individuals as well as from out-of-town 
people. 

RCA PICKS UP CHINATOWN 

The RCA recorders picked up China- 
town last Sunday with firecrackers and 
Chinese music galore for the Magic Key 
Program, which is broadcasted over KPO 
every Sunday from 11 to 12 noon. Sim- 
ultaneously, pick-ups were taken of the 
Chinatowns of Honolulu and Manila. 

In an interview with S. H. Shum, of 
847 Clay Street, the representatives of 
the RCA obtained first-hand information 
regarding the customs associated with 
the celebration of Chinese New Year. 



Seattle News 

By Eugene Wong and Edwin Luke 

The stork brought a daughter on Jan. 
10 to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mar, 3309 
16 St. Mr. Mar is manager of the New 
Asia Cafe, and Mrs. Mar is the former 
Ruth Dott of Fresno, California. The 
couple named the baby Barbara Ann. 

Garfield High School's Cathay Club 
plans to have another popular act in 
the school's annual Funfest, an evening 
featuring amateur talents, according to 
its production manager, Mosey Kay. This 
organization, which has twenty-five 
members, is the first of its kind in Se- 
attle's nine high schools. 

Pending the opening of school Mon- 
day for the local grade and high schools, 
the young people are spending their 
time at the Ice Arena cutting figures-of- 
eight and receiving jolts and bumps. The 
local skating rinks are drawing many 
Chinese enthusiasts. 



Henry "Butcher" Luke, winner of the 
President's medal at the University of 
Washington last year for making straight 
A's in sophomore pharmacy, bids fair 
to repeat. In the honor roll reports, 
the astute young man again walked off 
with all A's. Friends call him "All A's" 



now, and can he ta 



ke 



For the past month, the Chinese Art 
Club, with studios at 815 Jackson Street, 
has been holding an exhibit of art pieces 
produced by its members. The organiza- 
tion is the first of its kind in the North- 
west and hopes to retain the artistic 
heritage that has belonged to the Chinese 
since time immemorial. The public has 
shown much interest in the exhibit. Offi- 
cers of the club are: Fay Chong, presi- 
dent; Andrew Chinn, vice-president; and 
Doon Yip Eng, secretary-treasurer. 



Local movie-goers are looking for- 
ward to the next Charlie Chan film with 
interest, as Keye Luke, a Seattle lad who 
went to Hollywood and made good, will 
once more learn detective lessons as 
"Lee Chan", with Warner Oland again 
playing "Charlie". The latest Chan my- 
stery picture which is being produced 
now, is entitled, "Charlie Chan at the 
Circus". 

• • 

A daughter was born on Jan. 17 to 
the wife of Lee Hop, 520 Grant Ave., 
San Francisco. 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



Study of the Chinese 
Theatre 

The history of the Chinese Theatre, 
reputedly the oldest in the world, the art 
of the ancient actors and down through 
the ages to the present with particular 
attention to Chinese histrionics of the 
early days of California will be the sub- 
ject of study by the research workers of 
the Federal Theatre Project, according 
to an announcement by Miss Elizabeth 
Elson, supervisor for the counties of San 
Francisco and Alameda. Miss Lois Fo- 
ster is directing the workers. 

Psychology of the ancient and modern 
Chinese playwrights, methods of inter- 
pretation, the business of stage settings, 
symbolisms, costumes, the position of 
the theatre in the life of the people of 
all ages in the great empire of Chi'en 
are but a few of the subjects that will 
be delved into and set down for future 
generations to read, study and more 
readily understand, according to Miss 
Elson. 

Research will also be conducted into 
the Chinese puppet and marionette thea- 
tres and, if found feasible, adaptations 
made for reproduction in the Project's 



marionette division. Miss Elson points 
to the claim of many that the Chinese 
were the first known people to use pup- 
pets and later marionettes. They were 
used for entertainment and in relaying 
from generation to generation, myths, 
legends, history and lore of the past in 
dramatic and tableau form. 

The Federal Theatre Project has been 
in existence but a few weeks. Already 
all of the various divisions are in full 
operation. More than 400 people are 
engaged and this number will be increas- 
ed to approximately 600. 

The units in the San Francisco Pro- 
ject consist of research, drama, marion- 
ettes, scene design and manufacture, cos- 
tume design and manufacture, theatre 
and company management and operation. 

The San Francisco project was de- 
signed and executed, with the aim of 
creating a complete production plant. 

Playwrights, of which there are many 
in California, will have an opportunity 
of seeing their product in production, 
or at least of having a reading and the 
utmost consideration given, according to 
Miss Elson. Particular attention will be 
given plays having to do with the Cali- 
fornia scene. 




FOR ONLY $25.95 



The same engineering skill and 
unlimited resources that build the 
world's finest musical instruments 
have produced this handsome, 
low-price set. Four tubes — one 
of them dual-purpose — do a five- 
tube job, getting American pro- 
grams and police calls. 



MODEL 
T4-9 



RCA VICTOR 



THE GOLDEN STAR RADIO CO. 

EXPERT RADIO SERVICE 

846 Clay Street Telephone CHina 2322 

San Francisco, California 



Allee, the Towntrotter, says: 

Bang! It's Chinese New Year and 
here are our visitors in town . . . .PAUL 
WONG (former S. F. boy) was sent 
back here by the Chinese government for 
advanced aeronautical training .... 
ROGER and FRANK WONG (brothers 
of ANNA MAY WONG) were seen at 
the Chitena dance .... ANNA MAY'S 
big brother, JAMES WONG is now in 
Shanghai . . . .that up and coming swim- 
er WILLIE ONG also left on the same 
boat as Anna May Wong .... said to 
be the only Chinese professional golfer 
is JUNIEA JOP who came from Hono- 
lulu not long ago; he is in town to par- 
ticipate in the S. F. National Champion- 
ship tournament at Lake Merced .... 
wotta man TEDDY LEONG came up 
from Los Angeles to attend the New 
Year dances .... Mr. and Mrs. ED 
CHINN were in town for a short (four 
hour) stay; EDDY now owns the beauti- 
ful GOLDEN DRAGON CAFE in 
Stockton .... Cupid in Chinatown: 
RAYMOND LOWE (Oakland boy) and 
CARENA SING are planning a wedding 
soon .... school day sweethearts EDDY 
LEONG (Mission) and LOUISE LYM 
are romancing these days .... rumors 
that ALICE ENG and her 'beau' WAL- 
TER SHEW are engaged .... in such 
sentimental moods ANDY YUKE must 
be 'in the mood for love' (the lucky guy, 
he won a box of candy at the Chitena 
dance) — so excited, he yells for MAR- 
IAN! .... blessed event for Mr. and 
Mrs. JAMES LOW recently .... EVA 
LOWE left for Los Angeles again (for 
good?) .... and BILL YOUNG came 
all the way up (from L. A.) to take her 
back! — my, love goes a long way .... 
Do you know that: BILL 'Smoky' 
WONG is majoring in electrical engin- 
eering at Cal' .... HERBERT LEE or 
LEE HUNG CHUN, it is reported, holds 
a license as technical advisor of the LEE 

&c LEE Distilling Co NELSON 

YUE now represents the well-known 
packing company of Wellman-Pcck .... 
HERBERT LOUIE claims to be the 
snappiest and peppiest dancer in town 
(do you girls agree?) .... YOCHOW 
CHAN was dressed 'all Chinese' at one 
of the dances .... 

So-o-o, until next week .... So Long! 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 5 



CHINATOWNIA 



Tom Chow Travels 
31 7,263 Air Miles 

Taking advantage of the winter 
change in atmospheric conditions, Tom 
Chow, better known as amateur radio 
station W6MVK, travelled 317,263 air 
miles, a distance equal to over twelve 
times around the world, or over 417 
round trips to the North Pole and back! 

Chow was competing in a United 
States-Canadian radio contest, and al- 
though each participant was allowed 
ninety hours of operation, Chow was on 
the air only sixty two hours of this time, 
during which time he contacted with 
fellow-amateurs in fifty five of sixty nine 
possible sections and with stations in 
all but seven of the states in the union, 
and piled up a score that was far above 
the 30,000 point mark. 

A Cuban, a Japanese, two Alaskan, 
two Australian, and sixteen Canadian 
stations were among the 197 which Chow 
connected and exchanged messages with 
while in the contest. 

Although he has been a licensed oper- 
ator for only a little over three months, 
he has competed in two North American 
Continental amateur radio contests and 
is now increasing the power of his sta- 
tion ten times to 1,000 watts, the maxi- 
mum power allowed by the United 
States government. 

• • 
DETROIT MERCHANT DIES 

Detroit, Mich. — Refusal to have his 
leg amputated cost the life of Chan Hong 
Jim, who passed away last Friday. Chan, 
a prominent Detroit merchant, died from 
an infection in his leg. 

• • 
KUNG AN CLUB ELECTIONS 

With a membership of over fifty, the 
Kung An Social Club recently elected 
the following officers: Albert Chow, 
president; Ng Ging Sing, vice-president; 
Frank Huey, treasurer; Wing Toy, Eng- 
lish secretary; Leong Tai, Chinese secre- 
tary; Victor Wu, executive secretary; 
Arthur Low, sergeant-at-arms; Dr. C. Y. 
Low, chairman of the Board of Direc- 
tors; James Mar, Edward Chin,Lee Chuck 
Ping, Edward Leong and Harry Wong, 
board members. 

ALFRED B. CHONG 

INSURANCE 

Kansas City Life Insurance Co. 

Office SUtter 2995; Res. PRospect 8135 

111 Sutter St., San Francisco 



SACRAMENTO CHINESE 
DRAGON DANCE 

With the entire Chinese community 
participating, the Sacramento Chinese 
School held a dragon dance Sunday, 
Jan. 26, in celebration of the Chinese 
New Year. A program, lasting from 
ten in the morning till ten in the even- 
ing, was enjoyed by the entire city. Per- 
mission to shoot firecrackers during the 
dragon dance was obtained by Fong 
Ging Wah from the city fire and police 
departments. 

• • 

CHINESE SCHOOL GRADUATION 

Sacramento, Calif. — Installation of 
new officers and honoring of the high 
school graduates of the Chinese Episco- 
pal Church took place on Jan. 26. Rev. 
Fong Mun Hin conducted the program, 
which included songs by three sisters, 
Mable, May Jun, and May Oy Fong. 
The graduates were presented with awards 
for scholastic standing. 

Mrs. Raymond Jee of Berkeley was 
honored with a birthday party by her 
three children at their home. Many of 
the children of the neighborhood were 
guests. 

• • 
FRESNO TO BUILD 
CHINESE SCHOOL 

Chinese citizens in Fresno are under- 
taking to raise funds to build a school 
house for the Chung Wah Chinese 
School. Representatives have been sent 
to Los Angeles to aid in soliciting funds 
for this purpose. 

• • 

CHINESE NOTARY OFFICE 

Melrose, Mass. — Wong Lay, a Chinese 
who conducts a laundry establishment 
here, was appointed as a Notary Public 
to represent the Chinese community. He 
will be the only Chinese notary public 
in the city. 

• • 

Under the leadership of John Gee, 
a student of the University of California, 
the Chinese Congregational Church of 
Berkeley is carrying on an interesting 
and educational program of religious 
and student activities. 

• • 
CHINESE DENTIST DIES 

Lee Ying Wah, 72-year old Chinese 
dentist and a member of the Chinese 
Congregational Church, passed away on 
the evening of Jan. 23. His death was 
attributed to a heart attack. Funeral 
services will be held at the Chinese Cong- 
gregational Church on Feb. 2 at 2 p. m. 



Distinguished Woman 
Visits Chinatown 

Mrs. Nellie Donahoe, former national 
committee woman of the Democratic 
party and now Postmaster of Oakland, 
California, and Mr. Donahoe, with Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Cone were dinner guests 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Leland 
Kimlau. 

Mrs. Donahoe was very much thrilled 
at the exquisite tapestry silks and inlaid 
teakwood furniture which adorn the 
Four Family Association. She is a very 
ardent admirer of Chinese art and an- 
tiques, and hopes to visit the Orient 
someday. 

Mrs. Donahoe is the only one of her 
sex to win a postmastership of a first 
class office. 

• • 
AGED CHINESE INJURED 

Ong Poy, a seventy-two year old Chi- 
nese, was knocked down by an automo- 
bile last week at the corner of Grant 
Avenue and Washington Street, when 
he attempted to cross. 

Rushed to the Emergency Hospital, 
Ong was treated for cuts to his lips and 
left eyebrow, and returned home. 

• • 

HARVARD GRAD DIES 

Dr. David Z. Yui, graduate of Har- 
vard University and co-founder of the 
Institute of Pacific Relations, passed 
away at the age of 54 last week at 
Shanghai. 

• • 

FORMER U. C. READER WEDS 

Friends of Miss Myrtle Hosang, sister 
of Mrs. N. Wing Mah, will be interested 
to know that she was married recently to 
Mr. Hudson Lee at Peiping, China. 

Mrs. Lee was formerly a reader at the 
department of economics at the Univer- 
sity of California, and since receiving 
her degree of master of arts from that 
institution, she has served the Chinese 
Government in the Ministry of Railways 
and was also one of the Chinese dele- 
gates who attended the Geneva Labor 
Conference several years ago. 



HOWARD MACEE 

COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 

• 
EXbrook 0298 San Francisco 

Anglo Bank Bldg. - 830 Market St. 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



TEA AND LANTERNS 



S. F. J. C. Freshmen 
Reception 

Entering its second semester of acti- 
vities, the San Francisco Junior College 
Chinese Students' Club will hold a Fresh- 
men Reception for all new students to- 
night, Jan. 31, 8 p. m. at the N. S. G. 
S. Hall. Only members will be invited 
to this affair, according to William Gee, 
chairman of publicity. 

The purpose of the club is to further 
cordial relations between the Chinese 
and other students. 

Officers for this semester are: presi- 
dent, George Chinn; vice-president, Gla- 
dys Chin; secretary, Lucille Jung; trea- 
surer, Horn Gok; athletic manager, Paul 
Mark; and social chairman, Daisy Fung. 

There are over 60 students enrolled 
at the college this semester. 



CHINATOWN KNIGHTS DINNER 

The dinner given by the Chinatown 
Knights orchestra last Sunday wound up 
with a sightseeing trip led by Ernest Lum. 

Their guests included Mr. and Mrs 
William J. Purcell, Mrs. J. Lange, Misses 
Florence I. Clark, Edna Hulsman, Ber- 
nice Lee, Florence Leong, Alice Lowe, 
Mary Chin, Rose Chin, Mrs. Henry Le- 
ong, and Messrs. George Grace and Er- 
nest Lum. The hosts were: Messrs. 
Henry Leong, Edward Dong, Harry 
Chan,Harry Wong, Jack Wong, William 
Lowe, Andrew Wong and Thomas Wu. 

• • 

Chinese Youth Circle 

Chinese Youth Circle will hold open 
house at its club house at 3 1 8 Street, 
Oakland, on Saturday, Feb. 15, at 8:30 
p. m. Friends are cordially invited to 
attend. 

Entertainment will include radio skits, 
orchestrations, amateur presentations, 
and Chinese drama. Dancing and re- 
freshments will conclude the program. 

Recently organized, the Chinese Youth 
Circle has at present approximately fifty 
members. "Cooperation is the Key to 
Success", is the motto of the club. 

Henry Chew is chairman of the or- 
ganization, with Dr. Raymond Ng and 
Joseph Chan as advisors. Chairman of 
the membership committee is Beatrice 
Lew; reception, Edith Chinn; and cus- 
todian, Eugene Lee. 




Anna May Wong Sails 

Miss Anna May Wong, well known 
Chinese actress of Hollywood, and inter- 
nationally known on the stage, left for 
China aboard the President Hoover last 
week. 

Dr. Mei Lan-fang, the most famous 
Chinese actor, will be her teacher in her 
initial start into the Chinese stage, it is 



reported. 

Miss Wong will remain in China for 
one year, and then will make a tour, 
probably with a Chinese cast which she 
will assemble. 

Her brothers, Frank and Roger, were 
in San Francisco to see her off. Others 
who were there to bid her bon voyage 
were Delma Mark, Howard Wong Louis, 
and Thomas Wong. 



Twin Dances Hail New Year U. C. Skating Party 



Twin dances greeted the Chinese New 
Year. The Chitena and the Waku Aux- 
iliary both gave a dance at the N. S. G. 
S. Hall on successive days. Revelers jam- 
med the hall in both dances and many 
stout legged individuals attended both 
dances. The dances ended at 1 a. m. 
but that was the starting point for many 
who seemed to be filled with New Year 
"spirits". 

At the Waku Auxiliary dance the 
girls tag dances gave the boys a chance 
to place themselves in categories. A 
most novel way of wishing their friends 
a Happy New Year were the Chinese 
"chiens" done up in orange gold flecked 
Chinese paper with the greeting printed 
therein. 

At the Chitena dance the guest artists 
entertained with their terpischorean in- 
terpretations, and vocal solos. The pro- 
gram dance proved a lifesaver to the 
popular girls who, heretofore, had a 
difficult time remembering who was to 
be their partners. 



University of California's Chinese 
Student Club will hold a skating party 
at the Rollerland, Telegraph and 55 St., 
on Wednesday, Feb. 12 from 10 p. m. to 
1 a. m. The Rollerland is considered 
one of the best rinks on the Pacific Coast, 
and the manager has generously allowed 
the club to have the place all to itself 
that night. However, the public is cor- 
dially invited, as it is not an exclusive 
club affair. Admission is thirty-five 
cents. 

• • 

POLYTECHNIC PARTY 

A farewell banquet was given at Top- 
sy's Roost on Jan. 25 by the Polytechnic 
High School Chinese Students' Club for 
the three graduates: Henry Chew, George 
Chow, and Benjamin Chung. Eighteen 
were present at the occasion, which was 
presided over by George Chow, former 
president of the club. 

The following new officers for the 
spring semester were installed: president. 
Funston Lum; secretary-treasurer, How- 
ard Quon; athletic manager, Richard 
Wong. 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 7 



BEAUTY AT YOUR 
FINGERTIPS 

By Clara Chan 

The other evening, at a leisure hour, 
I dropped into the Mandarin Theatre 
with the idea in mind to keep up on the 
latest style of Chinese dresses as worn 
by the Chinese actress of the modern 
stage. Contrary to my intention of re- 
maining only as a casual spectator, I 
found myself captivated by the Chinese 
actresses who by their symbolic gestures of 
pantomime revealed to me their well- 
shaped and beautifully kept hands. 

Chinese First To Tint Fingertips 
As I watched the artistic movements 
I recalled a legend which was carved 
on a jade screen at an exhibit at the 
Chicago World's Fair. The legend tells 
that an immortal, famous for her beauty 
and charm was the first lady to paint her 
fingertips. It all happened quite by ac- 
cident, as one day the lovely goddess, 
while strolling in her garden happened 
to bruise the petal of a red, red flower. 
The stain from the bruised petal immed- 
iately stained her nails a brilliant hue. 
The effect created was so beautiful that 
ever since that day, she continued to tint 
her nails in color. This was the expensive 
habit she bequeathed to the world of 
beautiful women. 

My object in presenting this anecdote 
to you is not an attempt to point out the 
fact that the Chinese ladies had a share 
in giving to the world an invention, but 
to stress the point that Chinese ladies of 
old had already had an idea to keep 
their dainty hands as a dominant beauty 
factor. We moderns choose the silhou- 
ette, the hair vogue, and the correct 
modes of fashion for our favorite con- 
versational topics and so often neglect 
the interest that the hands are really the 
spotlights in our quest for immaculate 
appearance. 

Dressing Nails According to Type 

In dressing one's fingertips, one should 
remember to be consistent with one's per- 
sonality and occupation. If you are 
the vivacious dark beauty, dabble in the 
gay colorings. If you are the delicate, 
fair beauty, stick to the soft tints such 
as pale moon-glow. Of course, this 
idea need not be adhered to too rigidly, 
for I have seen frail clinging types of 
beauties wearing red, red tints and flash- 
ing jewel bedecked fingers. But there is 
a good old standby rule in regard to 
coloring your nails, and that is the use 
of tints in following your occupation. 
The Chinese business girls have shown 
good taste in keeping their nails beauti- 



LIEN FA SAW YOU 

You simply must hear about Miss 
Grace Hee's nice looking suit. It is 
of black wool crepe, with a caracul peter 
pan collar that ties in the front. Her 
soft black hat worn extremely forward 
on her head, allowing her neat pug to 
show in the back, was indeed smart. If 
you were at the Chitena dance you could- 
n't have missed this slim lady who is a 
nurse at the Chinese Hospital. 

"Lovely to look at," and I am sure 
"delightful to know", Miss Edna Wong 
of Oakland was charming in pale rose 
and brown crinkled crepe, with a high 
neckline, an essentially important fash- 
ion note of this season, and smart details. 
I am sure those of us who attended the 
Waku dance last Saturday will agree that 
she looked very becoming, indeed. 

Very much in spirit with the Chinese 
New Year, Miss Madeline Yee, a student 
of Girls' High School, was seen on New 
Year's Day wearing a small wreath of 
Chinese lilies in her hair. The delicate, 
fragrant flowers made a delightful orna- 
ment, especially since she was becomingly 
garbed in a Chinese gown of silk brocade. 



fully trimmed, and softly tinted. Most 
employers deplore the red polish in busi- 
ness hours, so keep your gay colors with 
your gay clothes and parties. School 
girls are frequently seen with tints of 
bright red that fairly scream at us, and 
it is wise for the youngsters to keep their 
nails to a decent length, clean, and na- 
tural tinted. 

Cosmetic Aids 

The smartest rule is, with the assist- 
ance of cosmetic aids, keep your hands 
presentable. There are protective creams 
and lotions to soften and whiten hard 
working hands. Gloves also are a means 
of protection to the housewife. As a 
fashion hint, there are new colors on 
the market, such as a copper tint to 
wear with brown, and a new rose tint 
which will go nicely with the new blues, 
and gray. 

We Chinese girls have the prestige of 
possessing dainty and well-shaped hands. 
For instance, Anna May Wong of 
movie fame, is not only internationally 
famous for her dramatic ability, but also 
for being the possessor of a beautiful 
pair of hands. It is a joy to own a pair 
of charming expressive hands, but to keep 
them beautiful is another thing. It is 
up to the person herself to keep them 
smartly tinted according to her own 
taste, and have them always well trimmed 
and neat to offset her immaculate charm. 



POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



Did you notice that it was cold at the 
Chitena Dance? Well, someone did, for 
he sat on a radiator to warm himself. 



To the members that attended the 
Church social instead of accompanying 
their boy friends to the Waku dance. 
You were at the wrong place, (maybe 
to some one else it was the right place 
that evening). Authority: the 'Eye Snoop 
M' detektive agency. 



Was Rev. T. T. Taam's face red when 
a Japanese ups to him and starts a con- 
versation .... in Japanese. He hopes 
it was because of the way he dresses, for 
he can easily change his suit. 



At the Young Peoples Union Soci* r 
a near tragedy was averted when one 
person left in the room. Why? well, be- 
cause there were only 60 ice creams or- 
dered and 61 were present. 



It is bad enough to sleep during a 
sermon but to snore, why, that is the last 
straw! (One reason I dare not doze — !) 



Who was the lucky bum who attended 
the Cambodian ball because his brother 
was ill? The brother worked diligently 
two weeks before the ball making his 
costume and bought his ticket only to 
fall by the wayside. And he wanted to 
go so badly, too. Next year, my friend, 
better luck or better resistance. 

(Also, who was the one who thought 
the ball was on Saturday, so he stayed 
home Friday? Anyway, the $2.50 ticket 
makes an awfully nice souvenir!) 



Friends of Harry Mew were shown 
pictures of himself on skis gliding nicely 
down the ice. What I would like to see 
is the picture soon afterwards when he 
is in a much more graceful position (so 

I understand!) 

• • 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Ng of Oakland 
became the proud parents of a seven 
pound boy, Wellington Raymond, on 
Jan. 25. 

Dr. Ng, an optometrist, has offices at 
the Martyn Building in Oakland, and is 
well known in East Bay circles. 



Page 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, #2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, #2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 

STAFF 

CHING WAH LEE Associate Editor 

WILLIAM HOY Associate Editor 

FRED GEORGE WOO Sports 

CLARA CHAN Fashions 

ETHEL LUM Community Welfare 



ROBERT G. POON 
GEORGE CHOW 



Circulation 
.Advertising 



CHINATOWN, UNITE! 

The criticism is frequently heard that the Chinese 
are like a "pan of scattered grains of sand". We our- 
selves have often deplored our lack of cooperation, our 
failure to present a united front toward external aggres- 
sion. 

This is nowhere more clearly demonstrated than in 
this Chinese community. Within this small area of 
approximately 25 square blocks, and among this popu- 
lation of 19,000, we are represented by more clubs, 
churches, welfare organizations, and social institutions 
than any other community of similar size. Ten Chinese 
language schools supported by various large organi- 
zations, besides a score of private schools, serve a total 
enrollment of about 2,000 pupils, resulting in un- 
necessary waste of funds and duplication of efforts. 
We find seven Protestant churches where one union 
church would adequately provide for the religious edu- 
cation and social needs of their separate congregations. 
There are innumerable family and district organiza- 
tions, perpetuating prejudices and sectionalistic distinc- 
tions transplanted to this soil from our ancestral home 
in China. Our five dailies voice the varying political 
views of our many factions. Even in the organizations 
of our young people is carried out this over-zealous 
enthusiasm for individualism. 

It is essential and healthy for the community to pre- 
serve its variety, in lines of endeavor, in economic and 
educational pursuits. Uniformity is not what we want, 
for uniformity destroys initiative and creativeness. What 
we need is not uniformity, but unity. As a community, 
we should be unified in aim, in purpose, in a common 
drive towards the betterment of the society of which 
we are members. In this unity there need be no sacrifice 
of individuality, but the quest for individual aggrand- 



THE DRAGON DANCE 

At the end of a week of New Year festivities, we 
remember the Dragon Dance not only for its picturesque 
and entertaining features, but for the human interest 
behind it. 

Those who so generously contributed to the cause 
deserve the thanks of the community; and surely their 
hearts must have felt full, when the Dragon made its 
three kow-tows amid firecrackers, before leaping to 
receive the donations. The money will help to fill the 
coffers of the Chinese Hospital that it may continue 
its work among the needy sick, and for the continuance 
of its clinics. 

ON BEING DISTINGUISHED 

Tzu Chang asked: What must a man do in order 
to be considered distinguished?" — The master said: 
"What do you mean by the term distinguished?" — 
Tzu Chang replied: "I mean one whose fame fills both 
his own private circle and the State at large." — The 
Master said: "That is notoriety, not distinction. The 
man of true distinction is simple, honest, and a lover 
of justice and duty. He weighs men's words, and 
observes the expression of their faces. 

"He is anxious to put himself below others. Such 
a one is truly distinguished in his private and his public 
life. As to the man who is merely much talked about, 
he puts on an appearance of charity and benevolence, 
but his actions belie it. He is self-satisfied and has 
no misgivings. 

"Neither in private nor public life does he achieve 
more than notoriety." Confucius. 551 B! C. 

izement must be subordinated to the more important 
welfare of the entire community. There can be no 
cooperation among our people until such unity of mind 
can be achieved. 

To save ourselves from ultimate extinction, we must 
awaken a community spirit. Unified, we survive and 
flourish. History proves that races and nations which 
survive in this world of eternal struggle are those which 
have learned this lesson of strength through unity. 

In striving for this unity, we must seek first to culti- 
vate better understanding and greater tolerance be- 
tween the older and the younger generations. Our 
American born Chinese, the future guardians of our 
community, should learn to appreciate more the culture 
which is their rich heritage, and to venerate the philo- 
sophy which has kept alive our civilization. Only 
with old and young working together in harmony CM 
we hope to preserve this community. E. L. 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



C HINESE DIGEST 

CULTURE 



Page 9 



CHINGWAH LEE 



CERAMIC ART 

(X) Evolution of The Hollow Base 
and The Foot Rim. 

The evolution of the hollow base and. 
the use of the foot rim as the "foot" of 
ceramic vessels is another aspect of pot- 
tery on which practically nothing has 
been written. The following are pre- 
sented as possible beginnings of the hol- 
low base which made its appearance 
universally with the beginning of the 
Sung Dynasty. 

Pre-Han vessels are without base in 
the true sense of the word. They merely 
display a flat bottom on which the vessels 
rest. At that, it is a great improvement 
over the globular bottoms of squashes 
and calabashes. Wih the Han Dynasty, 
we find wares with a raised base. This 
is especially true of wine jars and vases. 
The bases are rather high, as if to bal- 
ance the necks of the vessels. The 
bottoms of these bases are always flat. 

It was not until the T'ang Dynasty 
that we find two innovations which are 
of great importance. The bases of some 
ewers, notably those which have a pede- 
stral or bell-shaped base, often display 
a concave bottom. This may be due to 
shrinkage, or it may have been deliber- 
ately made that way to allow for shrink- 
age. At any rate, this has the effect of 
a hollow base, the outer edge often bev- 
elled serving as a foot rim. 

The majority of the T'ang statues and 
figurines are moulded in two halves and 
then luted together. They are, therefore, 
hollow. These statues generally stand on 
a rectangular, flat piece of clay which 
serves as a base. But some figurines, 
such as Lopakita, stand on an earth 
mound, or an animal reclining on an 
earth mound. This mound is also 
moulded and is hollow. We have here, 
then, another case of a hollow base. 

It is surprising that the potters did 
not learn to use the hollow base sooner. 
Many Chou Dynasty bronze vessels are 
equipped with hollow bases. The making 
of ceramic vessels after bronze proto- 
types, however, was not extensive till the 
Sung Dynasty, and by that time, the hol- 
low base was everywhere in evidence. 

Another possibility lies in the cylin- 
drical ring used by the early Sung potters 
to separate vessels which were being stack- 
ed for firing. Should they adhere to 
the bottom of plates and bowls, and the 
potters did not see fit to remove them, 
these vessels would be equipped with the 
hollow base. 



Remember When? 

Remember when we used to sleep on 
pillows of wood, porcelain, or wrapped 
brick? When all beds were of hard 
wood, springless and covered with a pad- 
ding of straw matting? 

The "blanket" was really a thick com- 
forter of cotton. The top sheet was 
basted to the under side of this comforter, 
the edges of the sheet being folded over 
to the top side of the comforter to serve 
as a border for the "bed spread" (pei 
puoi) which was a piece of brocade with 
a runner of embroidery near the head 
end. 

The bed was a boxed-in affair, often 
with shelves or drawers for storing per- 
sonal belongings or books. In the sum- 
mer a screen (mun cheung) would be 
hung. Some of the beds were elaborately 
decorated with carvings or paintings. 

It is hard to convince the younger 
generation that the old style bed is still 
actually preferred by many old timers. 
But so discerning a scholar as Mr. A. L. 
Heatherington, British sinologist, found 
the hard pillow more comfortable during 
hot weather. And in America there are 
many "health crancks" who will not sleep 
on spring beds. 

In traveling, the working man merely 
rolls up his blanket and carries it with him 
on the end of a long staff. The inns 
(as distinguished from a hotel) merely 
sell bed space. 

(Fourth of a series of 52 recordings of 
sociological and cultural changes taking 
place in Chinatown within a generation. 
Send in your observation.) 



Chinese Inventions and 
Discoveries 

(VIII) THE CHINESE INVENTED 
LITHOGRAPHY 

The Chinese had a form of lithogra- 
phy even before they invented block 
printing. As a matter of fact, block 
printing — "the plaything of the Budd- 
hists" — was resorted to only because it 
was a cheaper process, and not because 
it was more desirable. Unlike printing, 
which developed from the use of the 
seal, stone printing arose from the desire 
of the scholars to preserve the correct 
version of the Confucian classics for pos- 
terity by engraving the entire text on 
stone tablets. 

The practice dates back to 175 A. D. 
when one Ts'ai Yung, an official, secured 
a grant from the emperor to erect stone 
tablets bearing the classics in front of 
the national academy. Scholars, admir- 
ing the fine caligraphy on these stone 
tablets, would make rubbings of them in 
the following manner: a thin felt and 
then a moistened sheet of paper were 
first placed on top of the block. Then 
the two layers were forced into all the 
carved areas. A sized ink was next rub- 
bed over the flat surface. Upon remov- 
ing the paper when dried, the writing 
is in white, against a black background. 

These rubbings were remarkably like 
photographic negatives, and it was this 
factor which somehow conveyed to the 
beholder the impression of an unaltered 
facsimile of the original. For this rea- 
son albums of historic seals, famous 
signatures, and fine specimens of cali- 
graphy were invariably done by this me- 
thod — even to this day. 

(Continued on Page 15) 



A remote possibility lies in the tri-pots. 
The legs of some of these vessels have 
wings on each side. The upper edge 
of the wings are luted to the bottom of 
the vessel. The extension of these wings 
till they meet would result in some form 
of hollow base, especially if the legs 
should be grounded. 

Once a hollow base is achieved, its 
advantages to the potters become appar- 
ent. It appeared to be a compromise 
between the tri-pots and the flat base. 
It has the maximum coverage of a flat 
base, greater stability than a tri-pot, and 
just the right amount of traction. A 
flat base demands an equally flat surface 
for its resting place. If a vessel should 
prove to be lop-sided, a portion of the 
entire base would need to be chipped or 
ground to remedy the situation. A hol- 



low base, on the other hand, may be 
ground easily. 

In studying the bases of vessels we 
must determine whether it was achieved 
by truncation or if a base has been added. 
If it is a built base, the size and shape 
should be recorded. In either case we 
must see whether the bottom is flat or 
concave. If a hollow base is found, we 
must determine the shape and then the 
height and thickness of the foot. We 
must determine whether the surface in- 
side the foot rim is flat, concave, or 
convex. The extent to which the base 
is covered with glaze will be discussed 
in a later article. 

Copyrighted, 193 6, by Chingwah Lee 



Page 10 



CHINESE DICEST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



Dental Clinic Reopens 

On Monday, January 27, the dental 
clinic at St. Mary's School was reopened 
after a year of inactivity. It is planned 
to examine thoroughly every one of the 
four hundred and twenty-five children 
of the school with a view to the caring 
for their dental and prophylactic needs. 
On the first day, Dr L. O. Vireno, den- 
tist in charge, assisted by Mrs. Gladys 
Cole, examined forty four of the young- 
sters and found the majority in need of 
his services. Notes will be sent to the 
parents of the children setting forth 
the conditions as found with suggested 
treatment and consent slips authorizing 
the work to be done. The whole project 
of the Clinic is being sponsored by the 
Mission Conference of St. Vincent de 
Paul Society. 

One fact revealed in the first day's 
examination was the woeful lack of cal- 
cium in the system of the children. It 
was evident that the young children 
were not drinking a sufficient amount 
of milk. St. Mary's School is able to 
supply free milk for twenty-four children 
daily but has not the wherewithal to do 
more in that regard. It is hoped that 
the mothers will recognize the importance 
of this item in the young children's diet 
and make provision for it. 

• • 

FELLOWSHIP LUNCHEON 
CLUB ORGANIZED 

Members of the Presbyterian Church 
recently organized the Sunday Fellow- 
ship Luncheon Club for the purpose of 
creating better friendship and discussing 
important problems. Its officers are: 
president, Kay Ting Wong; vice-presi- 
dent and secretary, Howard Wong; trea- 
surer, Too Wan Leong. 



FREE FACIALS! 

IN YOUR HOME 

FOR APPOINTMENTS, CALL 

All Day - - CHina 0477 

8:30 to 9 P. M. - SUtter 9843 

EVELYN KONG 

Licensed Beauty Operator 

Specializing in Dr. Baynes' Interna- 
tionally Known Face Creams, 
Muscle Oil, Lotions and 
Face Powders 



RELAXING RHYTHMICS 

Realizing that there are many girls 
and young women in the Chinese Com- 
munity who are unable to participate in 
evening clubs and classes, the Chinese 
Y. W. C. A. is planning a program of 
afternoon activities which will begin 
Wednesday, February 5, and continue 
each Wednesday for a period, of six 
weeks. 

One of the most interesting of these 
activities will be a class in Relaxing Rhy- 
thmics. Rhythmics is closely related to 
the dance and is designed to combat the 
tight muscles and poor balance which 
do so much to destroy the co-ordination 
and rhythm which are essential to per- 
fection of line in posture and movement. 
Miss Neva Service, who will conduct 
the class, is a new member of the city- 
wide Health Education Department of 
the Y. W. C. A. She has her B. A. 
from the University of Oregon and her 
M. A. from Columbia. She was at Mills 
College for three years teaching dancing 
and corrective work and has more re- 
ently taught in New York City. She 
has studied with some of the outstand- 
ing dance instructors in the East and 
brings a wealth of background to her 
work in San Francisco. 

In addition to Relaxing Rhythmics, 
leadership will be available for corrective 
English and informal reviews and dis- 
cussions of current books and moving 
pictures. The afternoon activities will 
open, without fee, to all girls and young 
women who are out of high school. 

• • 

DRAMATICS GROUP 

Appreciation of beauty and an oppor- 
tunity for creative expression are of spe- 
cial importance in a world where work 
is often mechanical and surroundings 
drab. There is perhaps no art which 
opens up wider possibilities for develop- 
ment of poise, self-confidence, and ima- 
gination than the drama. The Chinese 
Y. W. C. A. is happy, therefore, to be 
able to offer to the girls and young wo- 
men of the community, who are interested 
in play-acting, a class in dramatics on 
Thursday evenings from 8:30-9:45 p. m. 
The group will have its first meeting at 
the Chinese Y. W. C. A. Thursday, 
February 6. It will be open to all girls 
and young women who are no longer 
in high school. 

Reliable estimates place the general 
death rate in China per year as 25 to 35 
per thousand, and infait mortality of 
from 200 to 300 per thousand. The 
birth rate is about 35 per thousand. 



NEW CHINESE STAGE 
TECHNIQUE DUE? 

The Chinese stage, one of the oldest, 
and traditionally faithful to the ancient 
style of programme, is at last due for 
a sudden awakening, as evidenced by 
the activities of the International Arts 
Theatre, of Shanghai. 

The purpose of the organization is 
"to sponsor and. create an intellectual 
and cultural centre where people of all 
nationalities may meet to . . . develop 
a workshop available to the entire com- 
munity for experimentation in stage pro- 
duction". Some of the activities of the 
organization are: Acting, dancing, dir- 
ecting, music, stagecraft, costuming, play- 
writing, plastic arts, directing, amateur 
cinema, puppetry, lectures and discussion 
groups, and private showing of restricted 
films. 

It is interesting to note the foreword 
of the play, "Lady Precious Stream", 
by Dr. Lin Yu-tang, one of the Theatre's 
patrons, who writes, in part, thus: 

"It cannot be said that the Chinese 
of old took a puritanical attitude toward 
the drama as they did toward the novel. 
Owing to the fact that the classical Chi- 
nese drama was essentially in the nature 
of an opera with the emphasis on song 
and poetry, it has always enjoyed the 
esteem which was poetry's due in ancient 
China. While the authorship of even 
the most famous novels was often cloud- 
ed in mystery, scholars were not afraid 
to be known as playwrights, since to be 
a playwright was to be a poet. Especially 
in the seventeenth century, dramatic com- 
position occupied the minds of many 
illustrious scholars. Since that time, how- 
ever, creative spirit in the drama has 
been on the wane. 

"Today it is just as important to experi- 
ment on a new theatrical technique as 
(Continued on Page 13) 



See Me Before You Buy 

ARTHUR N. DICK 

REPRESENTING 

Plymouth Chrysler 

• 

Bigger Trade-in Allowance 

Low Finance Rate 

Phones: CH 1824 or PRos. 2400 

james w. McAllister, inc. 

Van Ness at Post San Francisco 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 11 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY 



THE PASSING OF 
CHINATOWN: 
FACT OR FANCY 

Every once n a while some prophet 
of gloom, some well-meaning but mis- 
informed, journalist, investigator, ob- 
server, or out-and-out viewer-with-alarm, 
would take his pen in hand and discourse 
lengthily on the sad plight of the col- 
ony's falling business. After proving 
their contention by citing the closing of 
this or that business house, these people 
would conclude that Chinatown had long 
ago reached the zenith of its prosperity 
and that its nadir was near at hand. 

Not long ago the San Francisco cor- 
respondent of an American newspaper 
with an international circulation wrote 
an article on the economic tug-of-war 
between the Chinese and Japanese bazaar 
and curio business. The article carried 
this scarifying title: "Will Chinatown 
Go Japanese?" The article, of course, 
had nothing whatever to do with China- 
town's business as a whole, but merely 
one phase of it — the bazaar enterprises. 

A little later one of the colony's dailies 
in an editorial also lamented on China- 
town's vanishing bazaar business and the 
taking over by the Japanese of this same 
line of commercial endeavor. That edi- 
torial had this sensational heading: "The 
Sorry Plight of Present Day Chinatown." 

Last week the New World-Sun Daily 
of this city, a Japanese publication, in 
its Timely Topics column, displayed 
prominently on its front page the 
following paragraphs about Chinatown: 

"The largest Chinese colony out- 
side of China proper is located in San 
Francisco. It covers 12 city blocks 
and has a population of approximate- 
ly 20,000 souls. During the days of the 
gold rush, Chinatown was one of the 
most prosperous sections of this city, 
but conditions have changed. Where- 
as in the 70's and 80's there were no 
Chinese on relief during financial de- 
pressions, today there are over 1,000 
who are receiving support from the 
government. 

"Furthermore, Chinatown's business 
section is not truly Chinese any more. 
Store after store is now occupied by 
the Japanese. In order to keep Chi- 
natown for the Chinese, it is reported 
that a movement is being sponsored 
by Americans to help the fast de- 
creasing Chinese merchants. 

"According to the statement of Mr. 



Pardee Lowe of Stanford University, 
Chinatown is now facing its win- 
ter. Whether it will disappear as a 
Chinese section or not will be decided 
in the very near future. One reason 
for its decline is claimed to be the 
fact that the best brains among the 
American-born Chinese are leaving 
for China for greater opportunities." 

There, in three pithy paragraphs, Chi- 
natown is disposed of. With a gesture 
which only cold-blooded and nerveless 
news writers are capable of, the fate of 
Chinatown business is signed, sealed, and 
delivered — to the Japanese. In imagina- 
tion one could see the Japanese mer- 
chants encroaching into Chinatown by 
taking store after store from bankrupt 
Chinese, just as easily as Grant took 
Richmond, as Dewey took Manila, or as 
the Japanese took Manchuria. 

But, leaving all superfluous generali- 
ties aside, what are the facts regarding 
Chinatown's economic conditions today? 
Is Chinatown facing the dangers as this 
latest broadside seemed to indicate? Let 
us take our Japanese critic's debatable 
issues point by point and see where he 
is right and where he is not. 

It is true that there are more than a 
thousand San Francisco Chinese on dir- 
ect or work relief to-day, as evidenced 
by case loads carried by the local WPA, 
the State Relief Administration, and the 
County Relief. Likewise undeniable is 
the fact that in previous depressions no 
Chinese were so economically effected 
that they had to require public assistance. 
In previous years the unemployed were 
given temporary care by their respective 
district or family organizations, and the 
indigent old and the sick were, in most 
cases, sent back to their families or re- 
latives in China by contributions from 
clansmen and friends, for transportation 
then was cheap. 

The fact that about 30 out of some 50 
bazaars in the colony are now owned 
by Japanese does not justify the state- 
ment that "Chinatown's business section 
is not truly Chinese any more." One 
might as well say that, as there are some 
twenty thousand Chinese in this city, San 
Francisco is not truly an American city 
any more. For it must be recognized 
that the only line of commerce in China- 
town in which the Japanese have success- 
fully encroached on the Chinese is the 
bazaar business, and that alone. 

In the past few years much lament 
has been expressed and indignations aired 
regarding Chinatown's bazaar business 



situation. Since 1929 a dozen Chinese 
importers of antiques, curios, and objets 
d'art have liquidated their business and 
turned to other lines, while some have 
returned to their homeland. And as 
soon as one Chinese bazaar closed, a 
Japanese would move in, set up his goods, 
and seemingly prospered by selling the 
same kind of commodities in which the 
Chinese had failed. By this process the 
Japanese stores hace increased one by 
one, while the Chinese bazaars seem to 
vanish at the same rate. 

How the Japanese are able to outdo 
the Chinese in this trade is no secret to 
any one to-day. Their goods are more 
showy and less expensive than those the 
Chinese had to offer the casual tourist 
or souvenir hunter. Due to the depres- 
sion there does not exist to-day the buy- 
ing power among the Americans for the 
costlier and albeit better Chinese curios, 
fancy fabrics, and art objects. The pros- 
pering Japanese bazaar trade in China- 
town is another evidence of Japan's 
world wide trade conquest in which no 
other country has been able to compete 
successfully. 

But prospects in this trade are better 
for the Chinese to-day. Last year sev- 
eral of the large importers and exporters 
were able to declare profits after several 
years of tremendous losses. It is believed 
that the expansion of the Japanese ba- 
zaar trade has reached its peak; at the 
same time the Chinese bazaar trade is 
able to stand up on its legs again. 

Signs of the colony's healthy fcusiness 
condition may be seen in the remodelling 
of store after store along Grant Avenue. 

The opening of new enterprises de- 
finitely prove that Chinatown, too, has 
passed the peak of the depression and 
is gradually reaching normal life again. 
During the past year at least four en- 
tirely new businesses have been opened by 
young men, and each is doing a brisk 
business. This seems to refute the state- 
ment that the best brains among he 
American-born Chinese are going to 
China in order to seek better opportuni- 
ties. 

Chinatown has passed its winter. It is 
now greeting the loveliest of all seasons, 
the season of gentle awakening and of 
growth. Let Chinatown's economic life 
awaken once more, to grow again and 
to keep its growth. The sorrows of 
yesteryears are now but memories in the 
hall of time. A better and bigger China- 
town should be the hope of those who 
dwell therein. 



Page 12 



CHINESE DICEST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo ■ 



"National" Team to Form 

San Francisco's Chinatown has in its 
early stages of formation a new basket- 
ball team which gives promise of making 
its presence felt and be highly ranked 
nese. Although a definite name for the 
as one of the leading fives among Chi- 
team has not been chosen, it is known 
at present at the Nationals. 

Several prominent casaba throwers are 
members of the squad. Among the play- 
ers are Walter Shew, former Watson- 
ville star; Bing Chin and Henry Kan, 
Scout Varsity players; Frank Yam and 
Walter Lee, of Shangtai; Victor Wong, 
a Chi-Fornian mainstay; and Howard 
Joe, Henry Lum and Richard Ong, who 
was a star member of Scout teams a few 
years ago. 

To date, only one practice contest has 
been played. A game will be held at the 
French court in the near future, invol- 
ving the Nationals and an Oakland club. 
However, it is the intention of the local 
team to hold several practice sessions be- 
fore making its bow to the public, to 
make a stronger debut. 

Young Chinese Beat 
San Jose 

Staging a spurting finish, the Young 
Chinese Club quintet of Oakland de- 
feated the strong San Jose Chinese Club 
27-23, last Saturday at the San Jose 
Roosevelt Jr. High School court. Half 
time score favored the peninsula team, 
15-14. 

Key Chin, for Oakland, led his five's 
scoring, getting ten points. Jimmy Lee 
of San Jose was high scorer for the con- 
test, tanking twelve digits. 

A return game, which will be played 
in Oakland, is being arranged between 
the two clubs. On Saturday, the San 
Jose lads and the Palo Alto Chinese 
Club will tangle at the former's home 
court. 

The entire roster of the San Jose team 
is as follows: Bob Young, Ed Chan, 
James Chan, Frank Chow, Ernest Chow, 
Steve Chow, Harry Lee, Jimmy Lee and 
Gaius Shew. 

• • 

Chan Foo, of Quong Kee Jan Co. is 
sponsoring a basketball team to repre- 
sent his store. It will include many 
well-known names of Chinatown's ath- 
letes. On Monday, the entire squad was 
tendered an inaugural dinner at the 
Hang Far Low. 



SPORTS SHORTS— 

Art Louie is one of the very few Chi- 
nese boys to make the first-string unlim- 
ited basketball teams of high schools. 
Louie, rangy center of the Young China 
Club in Seattle, Washington, is starring 
in a regular forward position on the Gar- 
field High School Varsity quintet. 

• • 

It is reported that one of the worst 
jobs of refereeing ever seen in these parts 
was shown to basketball fans at the Fran- 
cisco School gym recently when the 
Shangtai and Sunset Majors hooked up 
in a City Recreation League game. The 
Chinese five was virtually forced out of 
the running for a chance at the title, was 
the general opinion of spectators. 

• • 

The local high school cage season 
opens this week and it will be an oppor- 
tunity for the public to see several Chi- 
nese youngsters in action on the various 
prep teams. Among them is Fred Wong, 
who is expected to carry Poly High into 
the championship scramble. Up to date, 
Fred has starred in almost every prac- 
' tice game for the Parrots. 

• • 

Chinese Youths Circle, a new organi- 
zation of Oakland is determined to form 
a basketball team next month. 

• • 

Tom Fong, former basketball player, 
returned recently from Butte, Montana, 
where he has been for the past several 
years. 

• • 

William Wong is a popular boys' lead- 
er at the Chinese "Y", as well as coach 
of the Bulldog Club basketball team, 
eighty-pounders. Willie in his hey-day 
was one of the best track and basketball 
stars in Chinatown. 

• • 
ENTERS J. A. F. 

With a capable mentor at their head, 
members of the 80-lb. cage team of the 
Bulldog Club of the Chinese Y. M. C. A. 
will endeavor to win a title in the Junior 
Athletic Federation basketball tourney. 

Coach William Wong is giving his 
charges numerous practices and hopes 
to make an excellent job in his first year 
as coach. So far this season, the Bulldogs 
are undefeated. 

Following are the boys entered in the 
league: Ronald Ong, Sonny Ong, Nor- 
man Ong, Chester Lum Johnny Chin, 
George Bow, Harry Lee, Dewey Lowe, 
Wong K. Lim, Sonny Lau and Jimmy Lee. 



All-Stars Nose Out Champs 

By a final count of 54-50, the Wah 
Ying Tournament title-winner, Troop 
Three Varsity, was defeated by the 
league All-Stars, last Sunday night at 
the French Court. A large holiday crowd 
witnessed one of the closest and hardest 
fought cage contests in Chinatown his- 
tory, with the lead see-sawing back and 
forth several times before the All-Stars 
finally came out on the long end of the 
score. 

Opening the game with a rush, the 
All-Stars piled up a lead of 29-19 at 
half time, with Charlie Hing, Fred 
Wong, and Fred Gok sinking them from 
all angles. 

Led by Henry Kan, the Scouts put 
on rally after rally in the second half 
to stave off defeat, with able help from 
Hin Chin and Steve Leong. However, 
George Lee for the All-Stars found his 
eye and Ted Chin tightened his defen- 
sive work. 

For the winners, George Lee and Fred 
Wong were outstanding, and for the 
Scouts, Kan performed creditably. Fans 
were disappointed in the first half when 
the Varsity failed to insert the entire 
regular team in play. The All-Stars 
also were incomplete, with several play- 
ers absent from the line-up. Six of the 
seven men on the squad were Shangtai 
men, Howard Ho of Nulite being the 
only man from another club. 

In the preliminary, the Married Men 
were given an upset by the Single Men 
of the Wah Ying Club. Final tally was 
28-17. However, they almost admini- 
stered a toppling to the Grim Reaper 
of Old Father Time. Opening strong, 
the Married Men forged to an early lead 
which they failed to hold, however, the 
Singles leading 13-12 at half. For the 
winners, Ed Mock, Oats Mammon, and 
Frank Hee starred, while James Jung 
and Harry Lum were the losers' main- 
stays. 

• • 

Jimmy Lee, formerly of San Mateo, 
California, and holder of the present 
A. A. A. 110-pound broad jump record, 
which he hung up during his school d.ns 
at the local Polytechnic High, is tr.iik 
coach in Canton for the Community 
Recreation Commission. 

Three other local Chinese boys and 
members of the Nanwah A. C. are bas- 
ketball coaches in Canton schools. Thov 
are Lee Jean, Thomas Poy and Edw.ird 
Lee. 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 13 




China Club Defeats 
Young China-Seattle 

China Club, a basketball team com- 
posed of veterans who have been playing 
together for several years, handed, the 
youthful Young China five a 16-11 beat- 
ing at the Rainier Playfleld Gym last 
week. It was a case of experience scor- 
ing over the up-and-coming youngsters, 
the members of the team are: 

China Club— Harry Mar, Clarence 
Mar, Yuin Chin, Howard Mar, James 
Malcolm Mar, Washer Wong, Sinker 
Wong, Frank Kwan, Bob Chinn and 
Harry Eng. 

Young China — Tommy Sing, Mosey 
Kay, Wally Lew Kay, Jimmy Mar, Ray- 
mond Wong, Lucas Chinn, Clifton 
Goon and Vincent Goon. 

• • 
SHANGTAI WINS 

Flashing an offense that fans have 
been expecting of the team, Shangtai 
scored another City Recreation League 
triumph, 59-43, over the Norsemen, at 
Francisco Court Monday night. 

Allan Lee Po received a total of 28 
points to top the scoring for the day, 
sinking baskets from all angles of the 
court. Charlie Hing and Fred Gok with 
eleven digits each contributed greatly to 
the cause of the Chinese quintet, as did 
George Lee, Ted Chin and Fred Hing 
on defense. At half, Shangtai held a 
commanding lead of 28-21. 

On Feb. 3, Coach Joe Chew's five 
meets the Rovers, reputed to be a strong 
team. 

• • 
YOUNG CHINESE LOSES 

Minus the services of Edwin Chan, 
star guard, the Young Chinese quintet 
of Oakland lost a close contest to the 
Franklin Service 55-49 Sunday at the 
Emeryville High School Gym, Emeryville. 

At half time, the Oaklanders held an 
apparent safe lead of 26-22. However, 
the Franklins opened the second half 
with a rally and took the lead. With a 
few minutes left to play, the Chinese 
again forged ahead, but just before the 
gun banged, the winners tallied several 
baskets. 

Scoring seventeen points, TCey Chinn 
captured high-scoring honors for the 
losers, followed by Shane Lew with 15. 



BERKELEY WINS LEAGUE GAME 

Chinese Athletic Club of Berkeley 
furnished the current season's first major 
upset in the Berkeley Basketball League 
by defeating the Thousand Oaks Baptists, 
favorites for the Division 1 1 champion- 
ship, 33-26, at the Garfield Jr. High gym 
last week. 

Playing one of the best contests of 
the season, the Chinese cagers fought 
hard from start to finish. C. Lee and 
Y. Lee with ten and nine points respec- 
tively, led the scoring for the winners, 
followed by G. Jue and W. Jue with 
seven and six. T. Jue played bang-up 
ball at guard. 

• • 

Y. M. CHESS, CHECKER CHAMPS 

Northern California's Y. M. C. A. 
Chess and Checkers Decathlon Champion- 
ships were won by the Chinese Branch 
of the 'Y' last week at the Metropolitan 
Y. M. C. A. From a brilliant field of 
more than 300 competitors, the Chinese 
representatives won every first place in 
the tournament, defeating the picked 
chess and checker stars in the six divisions 
from this part of the State. 

The following boys are the newly 
crowned champions: 

Checkers — Class A, Frank Fong; Class 

B, Louie Ben; Class C, George Gum. 
Chess — Class A, Harry Lee; Class B, 

Frank Yim; Class C, Chester Wong. 

CAMP BENEFIT MOTION PICTURE 

Even though it is rather early to think 
about going to summer camp now, the 
Chinese Y. M. C. A. is providing a 
means for all boys to attend. 

Boys wishing to go to Camp McCoy 
in the high Sierras are given a chance 
to earn part of their camp fee. A motion 
picture benefit will be held at the Y. M. 

C. A. this Saturday, Feb. 1, from 7 to 
11 p. m. Boys selling tickets will be 
given half of the money to apply on 
their camp fee. 

The program will include the comedy, 
"We're in the Navy Now" starring Wal- 
lace Beery. Also a famous Charlie 
Chaplin comedy will be featured. 



NEW CHINESE STAGE 
TECHNIQUE DUE? 

(Continued from Page 10) 
to preserve the characteristic charm of 
the old theatre. The peculiar forms of 
the Chinese opera were the direct results 
of the then existing social environments. 
When the theatre was in the open, and 
actors had to compete with the pedlars' 
cries, barbers' tuning forks, salt sellers' 
gongs, the crying of children and the 
barking of dogs, only a shrill falsetto 
voice could have been heard above the 
general din and commotion. The gongs 
and drums, too, served very largely the 
purpose of attracting the audience from 
a distance. With the change of theatre 
conditions and the influence of Western 
dramas, it is inevitable that the Chinese 
theatre of today should evolve a new 
technique. Modern audiences will no 
longer sit through a programme of six 
or seven hours, and this fact alone must 
produce a change in the tempo of acting. 

"The International Arts Theatre was 
organized this spring (1935) with the 
purpose of experimenting with new forms 
and a new theatrical technique, and en- 
couraging all types of creative, original 
work in this line, includng singing, dan- 
cing, stage setting, amateur cinemas and 
allied forms of entertainment. Its scope 
is not limited to any nationality, since 
art is international, but it is natural that 
a great part of its effort will be devoted 
to exploring and assimilating the tre- 
mendous field of Chinese theatrical arts, 
like Chinese singing and music, Chinese 
shadow plays and folk songs." 

Miss Ing Tang Lee, the star of the 
play, will soon arrive in America, where 
she will once again assume the role of 
"Lady Precious Stream". 

While the play ran for a long period 
in London, under an entire English cast, 
probably the "acid test" will be in its 
appearance in New York, where the 
Chinese version and technique will be 
used for the first time. 

It will soon show whether, once again, 
one of China's ancient arts will succumb 
to the spells of modern day fancy. 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Sir: Enclosed find $ for 

period of The Chinese Digest. 

Name 

Address 

City State 



Six Months #1.25; 1 Year #2.00;Foreign #2.75 Year. 



Page 14 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



Sino-French Convention 
Re French Indo-China 
Published 

The following are the chief points in 
the Convention regulating the relations 
between China and France concerning 
French Indo-China and adjoining pro- 
vinces, which was simultaneously pub- 
lished in Nanking and Paris last year. 

The city of Lungchou of Kwangsi and 
those of Szemao, Hokou and Mengtze 
of Yunnan shall remain open to the 
trade across the land frontier of China 
and French Indo-China. 

The Chinese Government may send 
consuls to Hanoi or Haipong and to 
Saigon, cities of French Indo-China, and 
the French Government may continue 
to send consuls to the localities mention- 
ed in the preceding article. 

Chinese nationals entering the terri- 
tory of French Indo-China and French 
nationals of Indo-China entering the 
territory of China must be provided with 
passports issued by the competent au- 
thorities of their respective countries. 

The nationals of China in French In- 
do-China and the French nationals in 
the above mentioned Chinese localities 
shall have the right to reside, travel and 
engage in industry or commerce. The 
nationals of China in French Indo-China 
and the French nationals in the above 
specified Chinese localities shall not be 
subjected to taxes, imposts or contribu- 
tions higher than those to which nation- 
als of the favoured nation may be sub- 
jected. 

Chinese goods exported from any Chi- 
nese port and transported without trans- 
shipment or without a trough bill of 
lading to the provinces of Yunnan, 
Kwangsi or Kwangtung and using the 
territory of Tonking, shall enjoy a pre- 
ferential treatment and shall not be sub- 
jected to the transit duty of the general 
tariff. They will only pay a duty of 
1 per cent ad valorem. 

Likewise, Chinese goods exported from 
the provinces of Yunnan, Kwangsi and 
Kwangtung to any authorized destina- 
tion and using the territory of Tonking 
shall enjoy a preferential treatment and 
shall not be subjected to the transit duty 
of the general tariff. 

Minerals of any kind, raw tin, and 
raw hides, shall be exempted from all 
duties. War materials, arms and am- 
munition which the National Govern- 
ment may desire to transport in transit 



COMMERCIAL TRAINING FOR 
PHILIPPINE NATIVES 

Manila, P. I. — Before long the 45,000 
Chinese traders and small shop-keepers 
in the Philippines Commonwealth will be 
facing stiff competition from the natives 
along the lines of commercial endeavors 
which the former have dominated for 
several hundred years. At least this is 
a situation in store if recent plans laid 
by the Insular Bureau of Education 
attains its desired ends. 

The Bureau is undertaking a campaign 
to show the natives how to be better 
traders, salesmen, and shop-keepers by 
recently instituting special two-year 
courses in these particular lines. They 
recognize that commercially the Filipinos 
are not as shrewd as the Chinese, but 
with proper training they may have bet- 
ter chances to compete with them. 
• • 

Jue Wort, a well-known business man 
of Berkeley, left last Friday on board 
the President Hoover with his family for 
a visit to China. 

over the territory of Tonking shall be 
exempted from all duties. 

Indo-Chinese vessels, excepting war- 
ships and vessels for the transportation 
of troops, arms and ammunition, may 
ply between Lang Son and Caobang by 
way of the rivers Long Ki Kong and Long 
Ban Giang which connect Lang Son with 
Lungchou and Caobang. Such vessels 
and the goods transported on them in 
transit shall be exempted from the pay- 
ment of any duties for their entry in 
China. 

The Chinese Government in the pro- 
vinces of Yunnan, Kwangsi and Kwang- 
tung and the French Government on the 
territory of French Indo-China shall not 
levy under any pretext whatsoever upon 
goods respectively imported or exported 
by French or Chinese nationals excise 
duties or internal taxes other than those 
which are paid by their own nationals 
or by any nationals of any other Power. 

"BE 



9 



G 



6 



T A O YUAN 

RESTAURANT 

• 

823 Clay St. CHina 0156 

Between Grant and Stockton 

fi Meals Unsurpassed in Si 
A Chinatown 'q 

k Also Wines and Liquors IV 

9.£P^GT^£> <S£^"©~^5>> <S£^<£T*Z±S> <$ 



CHINESE TRADE ON UPSWING 

Of importance to Chinatown, and a 
matter of vital interest to the Chinese 
merchants, a partially complete import 
survey has just been completed by the 
Chinese Digest. 

In 1929, the local merchants and other 
firms dealing in Chinese goods, imported 
a total of #20,019,898 worth of merchan- 
dise through the local port. 

Figures are not available for 1930. 

In 1931, the total was #6,155,208, a 
huge drop, largely due to business then 
prevailing. 

1932, the height of the depression, 
produced the lowest figure of all, 
#1,847,271. 

1933 figures are not available. 

Climbing up to #2,519,966, the year 
1934 showed the first signs of increase. 

For the first ten months of 1935, fig- 
ures released reached a total of #4,510. 
733. With the holiday trade of 1935 
still to be accounted for, the year should 
total to more than #5,000,000, to climb 
up to about a fourth of the 1929 level. 

Monthly totals for 1935 follow: 

January, 1935, #185,897. 

February, #483,824. 

March, #544,827. 

April, #547,718. 

May, #492,857. 

June, #490,513. 

July, #728,568. 

August, #406,836. 

September, 189,247. 

October, #440,446. 

November and December figures not 
compiled yet. 

CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Feb. 4; President Taft (San 
Francisco) Feb. 12; President Cleve- 
land (San Francisco) Mar. 3; Presi- 
dent Hoover (San Francisco) Mar. 11; 
President Taft (San Francisco) Mar. 31; 
President Coolidge (San Francisco) 
Apr. 8. 

SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Polk 
(San Francisco) Jan. 31; President 
Taft (San Francisco) Feb. 7; President 
Adams (San Francisco) Feb. 14; Presi- 
dent Coolidge (San Francisco) Feb. 21; 
President Harrison (San Francisco) 
Feb. 28. 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 15 



Student Activities in 
California 

Northern California— 

(Reported by Howard Wong) 

To meet the present crisis of Northern 
China, the Chinese students of the Uni- 
versity of California recently organized 
the Far Eastern Relations Committee, 
which will publish a pamphlet in English 
to be distributed free. At the same time, 
essays in Chinese written by the students 
will be published in the Chung Sai Yat 
Po (Chinese paper) to commemorate the 
Shanghai war of January, 1932. The 
committee will also organize a discussion 
group, to discuss the present situation 
of China, and a Mandarin class to teach 
those students who wish to learn the 
national Chinese language. 

The committee and the Chinese Stu- 
dents Club at Stanford University recent- 
ly sent letters to the Chinese student 
clubs of the colleges of the bay region 
in order to form a Chinese students' 
alliance in the western section of the 
United States. A preparatory meeting 
will be held on February second, with 
the program of the conference, to take 
place on Feb. 8 at the Chinese Y. W. C. 
A. to be as follows: 

1:30 to 2:00 — Registration of delegates. 

2:00 to 2:15 — Announcement of the 
purpose for the organization of the San 
Francisco Bay Region Chinese Students' 
Association. 

2:15 to 3:15 — Presentation of reports: 

1. Report on the national salvation 
problem. 

2. Report on the social and econ- 
omic problem of the Chinese in America. 

3. Report on the educational and 
cultural problem of the Chinese in 
America. 

4. Report on the problems of the 
Chinese second generation. 

3:15 to 3:30 Recess. 

3:30 to 5:00 — Discussion. 

5:00 to 6:00 — Round Table Conference. 

6:00 to 8:00 — Dinner. 

8:00 to 10:00 — Business Meeting, elec. 
tion, etc. 

10:00 to 12:00 — Social gathering, 
dancing, bridge, mah Jong, games, etc. 

Southern California — 
(Reported by Lim P. Lee.) 

The regular session of the Chinese 



Students' Convention of Southern Cali- 
fornia was called on Saturday, Jan. 18, 
in the College of Osteopathic Physicians 
and Surgeons, 1721 Griffin Ave., Los 
Angeles. Chinese students in the South- 
ern California institutions of collegiate 
rank or technical standing attended the 
Convention to adopt resolutions to send 
back to China. 

The host of the Convention was the 
Chi Omicron Sigma Fraternity of C. O. 
P. S. and the members of the College 
also gave scientific demonstrations after 
the meeting. They also conducted the 
delegates through the laboratories of the 
school. Members of the following col- 
leges attended: 

U. S. C, U. C. L. A., Calif. Institute of 
Technology, C. O. P. S., College of 
Medical Evangelists, L. A. Junior College, 
Curtis- Wright Technical Institute, Uni- 
versity of Redlands, Whittier College, 
and Chapman College. 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

• 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER b CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MACAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 



CHINESE INVENTIONS AND 
DISCOVERIES 

(Continued from Page 9) 
The earliest lithographic book was 
found by Dr. M. Pelliot at Tun Huang. 
This dates back to 635 A. D. The art of 
making lithographic books diffused to 
Japan toward the end of the T'ang Dy- 
nasty. Modern lithography is radically 
different, a vastly improved process and 
was introduced into China from the 
West. 

(IX) Chinese Formulated India Ink 
Block printing the world over would 
have been impossible were it not for the 
invention of the lamp black ink which 
is ideally suited for printing from wooden 
blocks or type. This ink, the invention 
of one Wei Tang during the Period of 
the Six Dynasties, fifteen hundred years 
ago, is called "India" Ink, Lamp Black 
Ink, or Encre de Chine. 

The ink is a mixture of lamp black, 
gum, and water. Its method of manu- 
facture remains unchanged through the 
centuries. Oil (sometimes, wood) is per- 
mitted to burn under an iron funnel 
which is made to revolve slowly. A 
scraper at the side collects the soot which 
is then mixed with other ingredients and 
poured into moulds. When hardened 
they form the well-known ink sticks. To 
use, the stick is rubbed against a mortar 
with water. 

The ink is used in China today for 
caligraphy and painting, as well as wood 
block printing. In the West is is used 
by draftsmen. The ink is very durable, 
and writings have been recovered from 
under water where it has lain for cen- 
turies. 

Printing, ink making, and paper mak- 
ing! Three inventions which made pos- 
sible the preservation of literature, his- 
tory, and achievements of mankind, and 
all three came from China! I do not 
believe it was because the Chinese were 
more inventive than others. Rather, it 
is their weakness for writing and for 
documentation. Neither do I believe the 
precocity a benefit to us. The early ar- 
rival of printing crystallized the Chinese 
language, and its progress from the 
phonetic to the alphabetic stage was 
arrested. 



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Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, January 31, 1936 



i i 



WATCH FOR 

HEARTACHES" 



A Soul-Stirring Epic of the Chinese Wars 
"First Chinese Singing-Talking Picture in Technicolor" 



Starring 

WEI KIM FONG 

Formerly of the Mandarin Theatre 



Produced By 

QUON YUM LI M 

Released By 

CATHAY PICTURES, LTD 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA 





o 



*•»> 



A WEEKLY PUfttiCftllOM 



ctuNese « 

cusesr 




COMMENT ► - SOCIAL - - SPOftTS 



E 



Vol. 2, No. 6 



February 7, 1936 



Five Cents 



CURRENT NEWS ABOUT CHINA 



By Tsu Pan 



• STABILIZING CHINESE DOLLAR 

• COMMUNISTS DEFEATED 

• CHINA APPOINTS ENVOY 

• JAPAN NOT AGGRESSOR? 

To stabilize the Chinese dollar and to balance the 
national budget, the Executive Yuan at Nanking (which 
corresponds to the cabinet in other nations) has recent- 
ly decided to float a new bond issue of $1,460,000,000 
in the domestic money market. 

Dr. H. H. Kung, Minister of Finance, declared that 
a consortium formed by leading bankers in Shanghai 
had already expressed its willingness to subscribe a 
large part of the bond issue. In order to guarantee 
interest to be paid at six per cent per annum, Dr. Kung 
said, only a part of the bond will be offered. This is 
tentatively estimated at $340,000,000. 

The proceeds of this bond issue, the financier added, 
will be used to stabilize the Chinese dollar at the pre- 
sent rate in the foreign exchange market. Opinions 
of financial observers seem to indicate that the Chinese 
dollar will be maintained at the rate of around thirty 
cents American money (i. e., one dollar Shanghai cur- 
rency equivalent to thirty cents U. S. currency) . 



A rampaging horde of communists were defeated by 
a trifling number of city garrisons in the city of Kwei- 
yang, the capital of Kweiyang province, in a decisive 
battle last week. 

Assisted by civilians, the poorly equipped garrisons 
managed to hurl back the communists and frustrated 
their plan of occupation. Credit is to be accorded to 
the civilians who were reported to have helped the 
garrisons in digging trenches around the ancient city 
walls. 

To join their comrades in the province of Szechuan, 
the communists were reportedly pressing northwest, 
demolishing towns and villages in the path of their 
movement. However, the captured towns and villages 
were only held long enough to loot a few shops and 
homes as the government troops were closely on their 
trail. 

The communist march to Kweiyang had brought 
panic to the population of the Southwestern provinces, 
and the upholding of the city greatly eased the tension 



of the moment. The Chinese government is at present 
massing troops into Kweiyang province from Kwarigsi. 
It is predicted that the red menace will be totally an- 
nihilated in the near future. 



Persona Grata was awarded by the Japanese govern- 
ment recently to Mr. Hsu Shih-yin to be the Chinese 
Ambassador to Japan. 

Mr. Hsu is a well-known statesman and jurist in 
China. He started his official career as a member in 
the law compiling bureau under the Board of Justice, 
in late Ching dynasty. Later, he spent a number of 
years in Europe studying the judicial systems. After 
the establishment of the Republic, he was made Mini- 
ster of Justice; and later, became the governor of 
Fenhtien Province. During the regime of Tuan Chi- 
jui, he was the Prime Minister. Of late, Mr. Hsu has 
been devoting himself to philanthropic work, being 
the chairman of the National Relief Commission. 

Mr. Hsu's qualifications to hold the portfolio in 
Tokio proved to be satisfactory to both the Chinese 
and Japanese governments. He is reported to be in 
preparation to proceed to his new post. 



"Japan is not an aggressor!" 

Hirosi Saito, Japanese Ambassador to the United 
States, made an strenuous effort to develop the above 
theme in a speech given at the Japan Society in New 
York last week. 

Intending to rebuff President Roosevelt in his mes- 
sage to Congress on January 3, the Japanese envoy 
impliedly told the White House executive that Japan 
is "not dominated by autocracy" and denied his asser- 
tion that the situation in Asia has "many of the elements 
that may lead to the tragedy of a world war." 

"Today in no part of the world, is there any selfish 
and misguided despot bent upon conquest for con- 
quest's sake .... not in Russia, Italy, Germany, France, 
Britain, the United States or Japan," the Ambassador 
said. 

"The Japanese policies in the Far East," he said, 
"are the natural products of hard economical circum- 
stances." 

The world appreciates the difficulties of Saito's task 
in defending the righteousness of the Japanese policies. 



Page 2 



CHINESE DICEST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



FAR EAST 



FORMER U. S. SECRETARY PAYS 
TRIBUTE TO LATE DR. V. K. TING 

(The following letter was written by 
Newton D. Baker, U. S. Secretary of 
War under Wilson and an associate of 
the late Dr. Ting in the work of the 
Institute of Pacific Relations. It was 
written to and published last week in the 
New York Times. The Chinese Digest is 
reprinting the letter in full because of 
the light it casts on Dr. Tings life, of 
the man himself as well as his great work 
in advancing scientific knowledge in 
China.) 

To the Editor of the N. Y. Times: 

The death of Dr. V. K. Ting, the 
eminent Chinese geologist, which was re- 
ported in the N. Y. Times recently, de- 
serves more than passing notice, for he 
was one of a select group, none too num- 
erous in any nation, who combine high 
intelligence and unusual qualifications in 
their chosen fields with broad culture and 
exceptional vigor. As Chairman of the 
Institute of Pacific Relations, I was asso- 
ciated with Dr. Ting, who was one of 
the leaders of our China Council, and 
had come to realize his important con- 
tribution to China and to the interna- 
tonal community. 

In his early youth at home, Dr. Ting 
received a sound literary training ac- 
cording to the Chinese classial standards 
of the time; while still a boy he went to 
Japan to continue his education, and 
thence to England, where he pursued his 
scientific studies and also acquired a fam- 
iliarity with the best English literature 
superior to that gained by most of our 
own college graduates. After a shorter 
period of study in Germany he returned 
to China. 

The direction of the National Geo- 
logical Survey of China, which had re- 
cently been established, was then en- 
trusted to Dr. Ting some 22 years ago. 
Starting with almost nothing in the way 
of exact knowledge of Chinese geology, 
with no experienced staff and with the 
most modern resources, Dr. Ting rapid- 
ly developed the survey into a serious 

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scientific institution which made itself 
favorably known to the geological world. 

In 1921 Dr. Ting resigned as head of 
the Geologial Survey but continued to 
cooperate actively with Dr. Wong Wen- 
hao, who succeeded him. As manager 
of the Peipiao Coal Mining Company he 
broadened his already wide aquaintance 
wth conditions of life among Chinese 
farmers and laborers, and became in- 
creasingly interested in social and politi- 
cal questions. 

Headed Academy 

Two years ago Dr. Ting became ex- 
ecutive head of the Academia Sinica, the 
the National Research Institute of China, 
under the chairmanship of Dr. Tsai 
Yuan-pei, the post which he held at the 
time of his death. In the short period 
during which he had been in charge Dr. 
Ting had already effected important 
reforms. 

In recent years Dr. Ting had been 
one of a group in Peiping, including Dr. 
Hu Shih, the well known philosopher; 
Dr. Wong Wen-hao, H. C. Zen and 
Mrs. Sophia Chen Zen, which published 
a highly interesting and increasingly in- 
fluental journal called the Independent 
Critic, dealing with social and political 
affairs, and had himself contributed to it. 

Dr. Ting's sudden death will be 
mourned by many friends in the United 
States and in Europe as well as in China, 
where he can so ill be spared. Many who 
have not had the good fortune of inti- 
mate association with him will remem- 
ber him as a delightful companion, 
those who have been closely associated 
with him will remember the inspiration 
of his complete devotion to the interests 
of his work, his frankness, the severe 




"H. K." EXPLAINS 

■ The display of gas masks in the win- 
dows of Wing Lee Co., which have inter- 
ested observers of Chinatown for the 
past week, has finally been explained by 
Henry Wong. 

It seems that he purchased a sample 
lot for a Mr. Y. C. Chan, who is over 
here on an unofficial buying trip for 
the Chinese Government. 

The gas masks are put out by the 
Davis Emergency Equipment Co., the 
same firm hat recently installed poison 
vapor detectors and combustible gas de- 
tectors aboard the Clipper ships of the 
Pan-American Airways. 
• • 

Future Clipper passengers, flying 
Trans-Pacific routes of Pan-American 
Airway Systems, may now actually see 
the tableware they will use while having 
their meal aboard the "Clipper Ships." 
This display is shown in the window of 
the District Traffic Office of the Pan- 
Amerian Airways Company at 427 Post 
Street, in San Francisco. It is the first 
time that this unique display has ever 
been shown. 



limitation which he placed on his few 
prejudices, his modesty combined with 
courage and decision when called for, and 
his capacity for friendship. Thus passes 
one of the world's great and wise servants 
and friends. 

NEWTON D. BAKER. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 20, 1936. 

• • 

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5^ri^ & {Seff 
FLORISTS 



TYPEWRITERS 

• 

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Adding Machine Co. 

17 Second Street SUtter 6670 

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Friday, February 7, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



PORTLAND NEWS 

By Eva Moe 

Four Chinese students, Dorothy Wong, 
Majorie Chin and James Moe from Lin- 
coln High School, and May Seid from 
Washington High, were graduated on 
Jan. 24. James Moe was a first honor 
grad finishing in three and a half years 
with an E average in his studies. 

Dorothy Wong and Majorie Chin 
were given a graduation party in their 
honor by the Girl Reserves at the home 
of Mrs. Stanley Chin. The highlight of 
the evening was a scavenger hunt which 
sent all the guests over the entire neigh- 
borhood in quest of their treasures. 
Dancing and a buffet supper followed. 

Seattle's Chinese Girls' Club invaded 
Portland last week for a return contest 
with the Chung Wah Girls' basketball 
team and was handed a 35-15 defeat at 
the Y. W. C. A. court. In spite of the 
excellent work of the Seattlelites, the 
Portland lassies proved to be too much 
for the invaders. Chung Wah has suffer- 
ed but one defeat in eight games so far 
this season. After the tilt, open house 
was held at the "Y" social hall. 

Wah Kiang Club of Portland, Oregon 
scored a 38-16 triumph over the invading 
Waku Club of Seattle, Washington, last 
week at the Salvation Army floor. This 
overwhelming victory by the Portland 
Chinese was achieved through their con- 
sistent speed throughout the entire con- 
test. 

• • 
SPORTSMEN HOLD 
ANNUAL SHOOT 

Chinese Sportsmen Club's second an- 
nual trap and skeet shoot will be held on 
Sunday, Feb. 16, at the Golden Gate 
Gun Club, Alameda. Guns will be sup- 
plied free by the Gun Club. 

All Chinese who are interested in 
shooting are invited to participate. Those 
intending to join are requested to meet 
at the club, 156 Waverly Place at 8:15 
a. m. or meet at the Alameda ferry. For 
further information inquire at the club. 

• • 
SACRAMENTO HOLDS 
PATRIOTIC PROGRAM 

The Chinese High School Students' 
Club of Sacramento recently sponsored 
the showing of motion pictures depicting 
the resistance of the 19th Route Army 
against the Japanese invasion in Shang- 
hai. Stirring speeches were delivered by 
Wong Jok Horn, Fong Mun Hin and 
Yee Wai Duck. 



Essay Contest Deadline Near 

Only five weeks now remain to join the 
Essay Contest sponsored by the Ging 
Hawk Club of New York City, a com- 
munication from the president of the 
club, Miss Anna Lee, indicated. This 
contest was initiated several months ago 
for the specific purpose of learning "the 
thoughts of Chinese-American youth in 
regard to the problems arising from the 
conflicts of Chinese and American cul- 
tures". 

The subject of this essay contest is 
"Does My Future Lie In China or Amer- 
ica?" and there will be a #20 award for 
the best essay, and #10 for the runner-up. 
Those eligible to enter this interesting 
contest must be American born Chinese 
boys or girls, between the ages of 17 and 
25, and must be residents of the contin- 
ental United States and Hawaii. 

Rules governing the contest are: essay 
should be 1,000 to 1,500 words; must 
be typewritten; must be accompanied by 
a snapshot of the entrant; and must be 
in before midnight of March 31, 1936. 
No manuscripts will be returned to the 
writers unless otherwise specified. Manu- 
scripts are to be addressed to Miss Anna 
Lee, 32 Mott St., New York . 

The Ging Hawk Club announced that 
the "essays will be judged on originality 
of context; and the winners will be an- 
nounced on the third week of April, 
1936." 

• • 

L. A. DRAGON DANCE FUND 

Funds totaling approximately a thou- 
sand dollars were received from the Los 
Angeles Chinese Dragon Dance, spon- 
sored by the Chinese students. Funds 
derived are for the benefit of the Chinese 
Boy Scouts of the city. The program 
also included Chinese boxing exihibitions 
and the inevitable fireworks. 



See Me Before You Buy 

ARTHUR N. DICK 

REPRESENTING 

Plymouth Chrysler 

• 

Bigger Trade-in Allowance 

Low Finance Rate 

Phones: CH 1824 or PRos. 2400 

james w. McAllister, inc. 

Van Ness at Post San Francisco 



POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



A brand new 1936 car loaned to you, 
one group of young ladies (about 7), 
what more can two young men ask for? 
But, hi ho, it seemed that everyone pre- 
ferred to walk that night. And, again — 
hi, ho, better luck next time. 



I have been requested to print this: 
At a recent girls' club meeting there were 
15 persons present, 14 were girls, who 
was the fifteenth person? (When you 
find out, please tell me.) 



Some very embarrassing moments come 
out of misjudging things. Take a certain 
miss, for instance. She misjudged her- 
self (?), and if it were not for the timely 
presence of a Helpful Henry she would 
have had to carry the chair around till 
some one pulled it off. Imagine walking 
around the streets attached to a chair! 

A certain young S. F. matron, in con- 
versation with three Oakland young men 
remarked that she would like to attend 
the U. C. Chinese Students' Club Skat- 
ing Party, but regretted that friend hus- 
band would be busy that night; where- 
upon, one of the young men gallantly 
stood up and said, "I'm an illegible 
escort for you." It was all very plain. 



While walking along Spofford Street 
with Mrs. B. C. I spied an old flag, the 
five colored one, and it being such a rare 
sight I pointed up to it saying, "Isn't that 
rather odd?" Said the young ladie, 
"Whats so odd about OUR flag?" Will 
someone please enlighten her? 

Last Rites for Dentist 

Funeral services for Dr. Carl M. Lee, 
72-year old Chinese dentist of San Fran- 
cisco, were held last Sunday at the Chi- 
nese Congregational Church, Brenham 
Place. Interment was at the Chinese 
Christian Cemetery. 

Dr. Lee, a native of China, came to 
San Francisco at the age of 16. He re- 
ceived his education at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons and was the 
first resident of Chinatown to own and 
drive an automobile. Besides his widow, 
Mrs. Bessie Lee, he is survived by his 
two sons, Daniel and Walter. 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



Our 



seller! 




MOORE 
-STYLE 
COLLAR 



Golftown 

OXFORD SHIRT 



$i 



.95 

3 FOR #5.50 



— You can shop far and wide and still not be able 
to duplicate this better-than-good value. 

— Long staple yarns used in this fine quality 
Oxford Cloth. Double shrunk so won't shrink. 

— Choice of five smart collar styles. All styles 
obtainable in white; blue in Lo-band style only. 

MOORE'S 

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

840 Market 141 Kearny * 1450 B'way 

Opp. Emporium Near Sutter Oakland 

(^Chinese Salesman here: Edward Leong) 




COLD AY (Ed Leong) SEZ: 

ON THE WALL of the president's 
office at Moore's stores for men, hangs 
a framed slogan: "It's not the sale that 
counts, it's the customer.'' I have always 
felt that there were tremendous possibil- 
ities for any firm built on the founda- 
tion of such a philosophy. How many 
times have you found yourself high-pres- 
sured into buying something you really 
didn't need? Many, I'll bet. My per- 
sonal experience has been that on several 
occasions high-pressure salesmen have 
put the "screws" on me until, rather 
than feel like a "heel," I purchased. 
It is gratifying to find a store where no 
such tactics are resorted to. Instead, at 
Moore's, you will find gracious salesmen 
"bending over backwards" in their en- 
deavor to please you. And if he hasn't 
what you want, you'll find yourself in 
the unique position of being able -to 
walk out without loss of dignity. That's 
why I like to sell at Moore's, I dread 
forcing myself on people in order to 
make them buy. You'll find Moore's a 
friendly store — you'll want to come back 
and back. 

• 
BY THE WAY, there's a mighty nice 
buy in trousers now at Moore's. Regular 
#5.75 values now at #4.75. All wool 
quality in grey and brown. Moore's 
bought the manufacturer's entire supply 
of these lots in order to take advantage 
of a special price discount. They pass 
the saving on to their customers. Biggest 
selection is in 29, 30, 31, and 3 2 waist 
sizes. Better see them this week or it 
may be too late. 

• 

Contributions welcome to this column, 

and if possible, will be printed. They 

must pertain to men's clothing. Mail 

your contributions to Edward Leong, at 

Moore's, 141 Kearny Street. 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 5 



CHINATOWNIA 



"Benefit" for Workers' 
Summer School 

It has been wisely said that most people 
"would sooner die than think; in fact 
they do." Workers' education offers to 
men and women in industry, business, 
and other occupations an opportunity 
to train themselves in clear thinking 
through the study of those questions 
closely related to their daily lives as 
workers and citizens. 

The Y. W. C. A., because much of its 
membership is drawn from industrial 
ranks, has been active in workers' edu- 
cation, according to Mrs. Bernice Foley, 
group worker at the Chinese branch. 
Last year the 965 Club raised money 
for a scholarship which sent a Chinese 
boy to the month's session on the campus 
of the University of California. The 
club members are again planning to raise 
enough money to enable at least one 
Chinese boy or girl to take advantage of 
this opportunity to study intensively for 
four weeks under the finest available lead- 
ership. Although the 965 Club is not 
yet ready to announce the details of its 
venture, the club members are serving 
advance notice that the members of the 
community will be asked to enjoy them- 
selves at a '^benefit" on Saturday, March 
28, at the Chinese Y. W. C. A. The 
proceeds will be turned over to the city- 
wide workers' Education Committee when 
it begins its campaign for scholarships 
to send your»g men and women to the 
Western Summer School for Workers 
this year. 

• • 

MONTEREY CHINESE GIVES PLAY 

For the purpose of raising funds to 
aid the Cathay Band, the Chinese Stu- 
dents' Club of the Monterey Chung Wah 
School recently gave a three-act play 
entitled "Iron Blood". 

Misses Gee May Hung, Gee May Lin, 
Chin Hong Suey and Chin Sui Mow 
entertained with several dances, after 
which the students held a dinner party 1 
at the Canton Low Cafe. 




£©^^*85^©^^^^£^^^^ 



Allee, the Towntrotter, says: 

A member of the nurses' staff at the 
Chinese Hospital, GRACE HEE will 
leave for Arizona for a few weeks vaca- 
tion soon .... NUI-BO TANG came 
back from Phoenix, Arizona, after a 
stay — she attended a wedding party, it 
is reported .... the lucky guy — WIL- 
FORD LOO won a radio at Knox Coffee 
Shop this month (in a game of chance, 
oh yeah!) .... it's a long way yet, but 
FLORA CHAN'S birthday will be on 
April the 1st — it's not April FOOL, 
she'll be just one year older 1 . . . . 
PAULINE TONG is waiting on the 
nurses at the Chinese Hospital .... 
ROSIE LOCK calls herself LUCILLE 
now! — she and her 'handsome hubby' 
are working at the NEW CHINA cafe 
.... the town gals are interested to know 
where CHARLIE CHAN 'the roaming 
romeo' of Stockton is — or does MEL 
know? .... Cupid in Chinatown: WIL- 
FRED JUE and MABEL LEONG are 
holding hands these days .... WILLY 
LEE is now CONNIE'S steady .... 
that tall, dark and handsome salesman 
EDWARD 'Colday' LEONG and pretty 
Miss MARGIE KOE are very 'sweet' . . 
. . that orchestra leader of the CATHAY- 
ANS' is reported 'moonstruck' these 
days — must be DAVID SUM! (is it J. 
W? guess) .... HARRY CHONG and 
ESTHER TOM are still romancing .... 
Mr. Stork knocks at the door of Mr. and 
Mrs. GARLAND CHUCK and it's a 
sonny BOY! .... Do you know that: 
hi-power salesman ARTHUR DICK is 
the only Chinese representative of the 
Chrysler and Plymouth cars and is also 
doing quite well with the SELIX Cloth- 
ing Company of San Francisco .... 
one of our promising lawyers JACK 
CHOW is now connected with White 
and White, attorneys .... GUM WONG 
was appointed Athletic manager of the 
CHINESE YOUTH CIRCLE of Oak- 
land .... EDWARD CHAN (former 
Frisco boy) is representing us in Salinas 
.... Mrs. ALFRED K. WONG, the 
former MARY LEE of San Francisco, 
is now in the Chinese Maritime Customs 
office in Shanghai .... So-o-o, until 
next week .... So Long ! 

(In sending news to this column, all 
contributions must be signed, with your 
address also. All confidences respected.) 



SEATTLE NEWS 

By Eugene Wong 

Lew G. Kay, prominent University of 
Washington alumnus and former Chinese 
vice-consul at Seattle, has consented to 
be advisor for the Chinese Students' 
Club this year. The club is expected to 
achieve new heights under the able guid- 
ance of Mr. Kay, who is also an active 
business man. 



The Chinese language school for young 
American-born Chinese is going into its 
sixth year successfully. Sponsored by 
the Chung Wah elders, the school re- 
cently celebrated its anniversary under 
the new leadership with an assembly, 
featuring songs, dances, speeches and 
skits in Chinese. 

Chinese Baptist held its annual ban- 
quet at its social hall last Friday, Jan. 31, 
with approximately a hundred persons 
attending. The Rev. Emery Andrews 
was master of ceremonies, while Miss Ce- 
celia Allen, church welfare worker, led 
the community singing. A good meal 
sent every one home praising the cuisine 
ability of the chef, Dong Ming. 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kay Louis be- 
came the proud parents of a baby girl 
on Jan. 24. 

New officers for the Chinese Students' 
Club of the University of Washington 
for the winter quarter elected last week 
are: Henry S. Luke, president; Chuck 
Lei, vice-president; Frances D. Leo, trea- 
surer; and Edwin S. Luke, secretary. Re- 
tiring officers are Albert Wong Lam, 
president; Robert Chen, vice-president; 
Kaye Hong, treasurer; and Mary Hong, 
secretary. 

Players of the Waku Celestials who 
made the trip to Portland last week were: 
Gordon Poon, Raymond Wong, David 
Woo, Hing Chinn, Howie Mar, Jimmy 
Mar, Harry Chin and Henry Chinn, 
manager. 



• 


• 


HOWARD 


MACEE 


COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 

• 
EXbrook 0298 San FrancUco 

Anglo Bank Bldg. - 830 Market Sc 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



TEA AN D LANTERNS 



YOUTH CIRCLE HOLD 
SPRING DANCE 

Under blinking stars and moonlit skies 
the Oakland Chinese Youth Circle will 
hold its Spring Dance and Raffle on 
Mar. 7. The affair, which will be held 
at the Persian Garden, Webster Street 
and Grand Avenue, Oakland, is right by 
the shore of Lake Merritt. 

The winner of the prize waltz will 
receive a beautiful cup, while the grand 
prize winner will receive a washing ma- 
chine. A big floor show, sponsored by 
the Circle, is also scheduled, besides mah 
jong and card games. Admission will be 
fifteen cents. 

• • 

Pre-Valentine Party 

Mrs. Lois Lim and Miss Faye Huey 
were hostesses at a pre-Valentine party 
on Feb. 2, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Roderick Won on Brenham Place. 

Games, cards, and dancing for the 
evening were further enhanced by a 
dance by Miss Huey. 

Among those present were: Messrs. 
and Mesdames Jack Eng, Joseph Chew, 
Roderick Won, George Lim, Misses Hel- 
en Tom, Ethel and Mary Mammon, 
Mary Chinn, Leona Sing, Lily Tong, 
and Messrs. Ernest Lowe, Othel Mam- 
mon, Fred Wong, Edward Tom, Chester 
Look, Lawrence Chinn, H. K. Wong, 
and Henry Chinn. 

• • 

Deputy Consul Sun 

Speaks at Phi Sigma Sigma 
Mr. Patrick Pichi Sun, Deputy Con- 
sul of China, gave an address on the 
subject of the present status of the 
Chinese Japanese dispute at the month- 
ly meeting of the Phi Sigma Sigma 
sorority on Tuesday evening, Febru- 
ary 4. After Mr. Sun's speech, open 
forum was held in which many interest- 
ing questions regarding the Far East 
were discussed. Miss Clara Chan, 
member of the staff of the Chinese 
Digest, was also an honor guest at the 
occasion. 



OAKLAND NEWS 

By Hector Eng 

Pauline Chew, Oakland's budding 
songstress, celebrated her birthday party 
last Wednesday with a card party at her 
home. One of the highlights of the 
evening was a dance number by one of 
the guests from Fresno. Pauline received 
a large stack of congratulatory telegrams 
and a proposal. 



To foster intra-club friendly relation- 
ship, the Waku Auxiliary is inviting the 
Junior members to a Valentine party 
on Feb. 14 at the International Institute, 
with twenty-one seniors and fifteen Jun- 
iors expected to partake in the fun. The 
affair will be decidedly informal in char- 
acter and spirit, featuring children's 
games and races. For the more sedate 
members there will be mah jong and 
card games. 



Young Chinese Club's basketball team, 
last Sunday at Emeryville High, lost to 
the Berkeley Japanese Students' Club, 
31-21. The Chinese amassed an early 
lead, but were overtaken as the first half 
ended. A rally fell short late in the 
contest when Howard Joe and Junior 
Yee went out on fouls. Key Chinn and 
Shane Lew starred for the Young Chinese. 

In the preliminary, the Young Chinese 
Juniors nosed out the Japanese Students' 
Club second string. Final tally was 20-21. 

A Little Reminder — 

The University of California Chinese 
Students' Club will present its Spring 
Informal dance this year on April 4, at 
the International House in Berkeley. An 
entrancing campus orchestra will pro- 
vide tuneful music until one. 



niimuuui.iuuiu i !.,uunwu,Hii.iii,nuu,uuunuiiHunuiumu i nii,ni 

NEW 

CENTURY 

BEVERAGE 

CO. 

Manufacturers of 



Orange Crush 

Champagne Cider 

Belfast Products 



Y. W. COMMUNITY NIGHT 

A program of vocal and instrumental 
music has been planned for the Chinese 
Y. W. C. A. "community night" on Sat- 
urday, February 15, at 7:30 p. m. If this 
type of program proves popular with the 
members of the community, the Y. W. C. 
A. will be happy to arrange for more of 
them in the future. Everyone is cordial- 
ly invited. There is no admission fee. 

Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



820 Pacific St. 



DOuglas 0547 



San Francisco, California 



AWARD DANCE CHANGED 
TO TRIANON BALLROOM 

Anticipating a large crowd, the Wah 
Ying Club, at its meeting Monday night, 
decided that the Trianon Ballroom, on 
Sutter and Van Ness Avenue, would be 
more appropriate in which to hold its 
Award Dance, instead of the N. S. G. S. 
Hall, on the night of Feb. 29. 

Treasurer Arthur Hee and Social 
Chairman Herbert Lee announced that 
several hundred tickets have been sold, 
and a banner gathering is expected. 
• • 

N. S. G. S. SOCIAL 

The Chinese N. S. G. S. held their 
Spring social last Sunday. Cocktails 
were served to the many members who 
were present. 



In an effort to hasten checking facili- 
ties, and despite the customary precaution, 
a blue overcoat belonging to Dan Hing, 
was lost at the recent Waku Auxiliary 
Dance. The coat was made by the King 
Company of Chicago, Illinois, and had a 
white scarf with an initial "D" in one 
of the pockets. 

Any information as to its whereabouts 
will be appreciated and may be forwarded 
to Mrs. Eva Jue, 72 Seventh Street, Oak- 
land. A liberal reward awaits its return. 



On March 28, the Wa Sung A. C. of 
Oakland is sponsoring its annual raffle 
benefit; and an extensive program is be- 
ing mapped out which promises to over- 
shadow their previous performances. To 
enable local Chinese talent in the bay 
region to exhibit their wares, a bona fide 
amateur show will be presented and Wa 
Sung extends a cordial invitation to all 
artists who desire to participate for lu- 
crative prizes. There will be dancing 
after the program. Admission to this 
gala affair is only ten cents. 

George Bowen, chairman of entertain- 
ment, will confer with committeemen 
Worley Wong, Joe Lee, Glenn Lym, Hec- 
tor Eng and Frank Dun during this Sun- 
day's luncheon at the home of Worley 
Wong, in an effort to set a new high in 
hilarity and entertainment. 

New officers were elected to serve the 
club for the coming year at the Tuesday 
meeting. They are Ed Hing, president; 
George Bowen, vice-president; Robert 
Chow, secretary; Frank Dun, treasurer; 
Joe Lee, sergeant-at-arms; and Gerald 
Chan, athletic manager. 
• • 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 7 



FASHIONS 



CLARA CHAN 



OF ANCIENT CHINA 

One of the few opportunities to view 
rare and authentic robes of ancient China 
was offered at a recent exhibit of imper- 
ial robes and textiles at the San Fran- 
cisco Art Museum. This admirable col- 
lection of costly brocades and richly em- 
broidered silk loaned by Mr. William 
Colby comprised of masterpieces of weav- 
ing and embroidery rarely approached 
by even the most skilled artisans of today. 
Imperial Robes 

The fashion demanded by the imperial 
courts of the dynastic periods for the 
Son of Heaven and his officials were 
gorgeous silks with most diversified pat- 
terns. Symbols of distinction, indicating 
official degrees on the robes require an 
explanation. The imperial robes as illu- 
strated by the commentors of the Sung 
dynasty have twelve ancient sacred ob- 
jects painted or embroidered upon the 
robes. 

1. Jih. The "Sun". The solar disk 
supported upon a bank of clouds, with 
its 3-legged bird inside. 

2. Yueh, the "Moon", the lunar disk 
containing a hare with pestle and mortar 
pounding the elixir vitae. 

3. Hsing Chen, the "Stars", represented 
by a constellation of three stars connect- 
ed by a straight line. 

4. Shan, "Mountains", worshipped in 
China from time prehistoric. 

5. Lung, "Dragons", a pair of the 
fabulous scaly monsters, five-clawed. 

6. Hua Chung, the "Flowery Fowls", 
a pair of variated pheasants. 

7. Tung Yi, the "Temple Vessels", of 
ancestral worship, a pair figured with 
a tiger and a monkey. 

8. Ts'ao, "Aquatic Grass", in sprays. 

9. Huo, "Fire", in naming scrolls. 

10. Fen Mi, "Grains of Millet", group- 
ed in a medallion. 

11. Fu, an "Axe", the weapon of a 
warrior. 

12. Fu, a peculiar "symbol" of distinc- 
tion, of ornamental origin, used in the 
sense of embroidered in modern phrase- 
ology. 

The hereditary nobles of the first rank 
were restricted from the use of the Sun, 
Moon, and Stars; those of the next two 
degrees were further restricted from the 
use of the Mountains, and Dragons. By 
these gradual restrictions the official 
robes were made to indicate the rank of 
the wearer. 

An Emperor's Robe 

Of the many imperial robes seen at 



the exhibit, most outstanding was the 
Emperor's robe of K'o Ssu weave made 
with a back-ground cloth of real gold. 

The thread of the cloth is silk covered 
with red gold leaf, unusually small for 
gold thread, resulting in a weave that is 
extraordinarily fine in texture. 

Nine royal dragons, all of the front 
view, indicated that it was a robe for an 
emperor. The attributes of eight im- 
mortals are represented. The dragons 
are embroidered in blue, with a multi- 
colored lower border design of the etern- 
al sea, and projecting cliffs and rocks 
representing the earth. 

K'o Ssu Weave 

Like many of the lost arts of China, 
the K'o Ssu weave is also a hereditary 
trade profession. In this exhibit, one 
of the finest pieces of woven silk, is a 
scroll of the five hundred Lo Hans, 
(followers of Buddha). In this scroll, 
this lost art was carried to perfection. 

At first glance, the woven scroll was 
in all appearances like a delicately paint- 
ed picture, but upon closer scrutiny, one 
may perceive fine silk threads. Each 
color and shade is a separate woven piece 
so skilfully joined that the lines of de- 
marcation are scarcely perceptible. 

The length of the scroll is 29 feet in 
length and 16 inches in width, and al- 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

e 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 

• 



Lien Fa Saw You 

Mrs. Mark Dunn (Miss Lily Ow- 
Young) was darling in a deep rust wool 
coat, a close-fitting model of rough ma- 
terial. Of special interest was the ' col- 
lar and hood" — a hood when pushed 
forward over the head and a collar when 
thrown back, which sets into a lovely 
cowl. Mrs. Dunn certainly looked snug 
in this warm creation. 

Red fox on apple green! Doesn't that 
sound delicious? Miss Elizabeth Won 
was really sweet enough to eat in her 
green wool coat with revers of soft red 
fox. She wears with this a small hat of 
the same apple green cocked on one side 
of her head. 

Mrs. Theodore C. Lee, a charming 
young matron, should not notice these 
icy days of February, because her new 
fur coat is just the thing to battle this 
cold weather. Of gray caracul, swagger 
style, she looks both comfortable and neat. 
• • 

though the very descriptive groups of 
scenes were a continuous woven piece, 
each group has its own interpretation. 
Taken as a whole, the entire scroll de- 
picts the buddhist faith and the legends 
of the 500 Lo Hans. 

Head Dresses of Manchu Women 

Among the elaborate and costly robes 
and textiles, three head dresses worn by 
women of high court rank were shown 
with projected strips of foliage, and but- 
terflies, and pheasants around the crown. 
Kingfisher feathers were used, being ac- 
cented by emeralds, green jadeite, ame- 
thyst, amber, tourmaline, carnelian, tur- 
quoise, artificial pearls, and many other 
semi-precious stones. Symbolic forms, 
such as the bat, peaches and peach blos- 
soms were also worked in filigree. 
Imperial Carpet 

An interesting piece of textile, out- 
standing from the silk and embroidery, 
was the carpet used by the Dowager 
empress. This imperial carpet was made 
of cut velvet, with three borders: the out- 
ermost border has a swastika design of 
red and blue, the middle border has a 
lotus design, and the innermost border 
consists of an interesting geometric de- 
sign. Lotus and bat motives were used 
in the center piece, and the colors of old 
rose and gray green were seen combined 
with the blue background. 



Page 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 



Per year, ?2.00: Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, JS2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 



STAFF 

CHING WAH LEE Associate Editor 

WILLIAM HOY ... Associate Editor 

FRED GEORGE WOO Sports 

CLARA CHAN Fashions 

ETHEL LUM Community Welfare 

ROBERT G. POON Circulation 

GEORGE CHOW Advertising 



THE SLEEPING GIANT 

Far over on the western fringe of the great Pacific 
Ocean, a little figure stands alongside a flag bearing a 
red sun-burst,, on the top of a very rocky, volcanic 
island. This little mannikin glares fiercely in rotation 
toward the east, toward the north, toward the west and 
toward the south. His clutching hands reach greedily 
toward the Mongolian steppes, while a self-satisfied 
smile shines on the Occident. 

This active little personality dominates the land- 
scape in front of a background of wisps of wind-driven 
Gobi dust and steaming mists of water vapor obscuring 
the mysterious interior of Asia. Faintly, through the 
gathering haze, a few trained Western eyes can perceive 
the ceaseless activities of the teeming millions in China. 

History shows that peoples that have conquered 
China, at various times, have been gradually absorbed 
into the country and become a part thereof; such a 
procedure is likely to repeat itself for many centuries 
to come. Linked with this influence, however, is an- 
other factor which is definitely modern, but, neverthe- 
less, of great importance; that is the Young China of 
today which is striving to modernize the ancient coun- 
try and help its peoples. Along with this moderniza- 
tion is the development of a National Consciousness 
which will have a tremendous effect, in time, on the 
activities and accomplishments of would-be conquerors. 

It is evident that as the plans and desires of the 
Young China become realities happiness and pros- 
perity will come to the various provinces. Great high- 
way systems will appear all over the country, linked 
with an efficient railroad net. Mines will be opened and 
rivers harnessed for power development and flood- 
control. Streaming lines of trucks will move rapidly 



from city to city. Luxury laden boats and other means 
for transport will take mountains of choice commodi- 
ties to all part of that ancient country. Great areas of 
marsh land will become rich farming land; great ex- 
panses of water will be filled in to yield food for mil- 
lions of hard-working people. Treasures of gold, silver, 
copper, lead, zinc, tungsten, iron, coal, stone, pottery, 
silk and numerous other commodities will abound. The 
wonders of water steam and electricity will bring rest 
to millions of tired backs and comfort to millions of 
sore feet and strained muscles. Disease will be driven 
into the ocean by scores of medical men, and pestilences 
will leave the face of the earth. Poverty will fade away 
into the obscurity of legend and famines will become 
non-existent. Numerous deep-sea vessels from many 
nations will bring tremendous quantities of foreign 
goods and take away like amounts of riches from the 
Orient; this commerce will bring the ceaseless hum of 
industry to the sea ports and the wharves of the great 
river cities. Thousands upon thousands of river craft 
will bring food, wool, metals, stone, lumber, pottery, 
art goods, and so forth, from the interior and take 
back whence they came fabrics, wood products, railroad 
materials, electrical goods and appliances, mining 
machinery, books, medical supplies, doctors and other 
professional men and women, and miscellaneous pro- 
ducts of the Western world. Great cities with numer- 
ous skyscrapers will grow where mud-walled villages 
now stand in quiet poverty. 

Before all of these desirable things happen in 
China, the smirking usurper from east of the Yellow 
Sea will be driven back in his boats and sent scurrying 
to his earthquake and typhoon ridden islands, where 
he belongs, there to revert to a second rate power after 
aspiring to dominate the Pacific and all nations and 
peoples situated on the shores of this ocean — M. K. B. 



GREATNESS 

They are great men who follow that part of them 
which is great. Let one stand in his nobler part, and 
the meaner will not be able to take it from him. This 
is simply what makes greatness. The superior man 
desires a wide sphere that he may give peace to the 
multitudes; but what his nature makes his own, cannot 
be greatened by the largeness of his sphere, nor lessen- 
ed by its obscurity. Mencius — 371 B. C. 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 9 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



Chinese Inventions and 
Discoveries 

(XI) The Chinese Discovered The 
Circulation of The Blood, and 
(XII) Practiced Dissection Two Thou- 
sand Years Ago. 

A "Gray's Anatomy" was compiled in 
China toward the end of the Chou Dyna- 
sty. This work is attributed to Huang 
Ti (2698-2598 B. C.) but it is actually 
a collection of various medical work writ- 
ten during the Chou Dynasty or earlier. 

The book is called "Canon of Medi- 
cine" or "Internal Classic" (Nei Ching), 
and is divided into two sections, the Su 
Wen or Plain Questions" (Cathecism) 
and the Ling Shu or Introduction to 
Phenomina. There are scores of ver- 
sions, the most popular edition having 
24 chapters for the first section and 12 
chapters for the second section. 

On. the circulation of the blood, the 
following statements are found: "The 
heart regulates blood of the body. The 
current flows continuously like the cur- 
rent of a river, or the sun and moon in 
their orbits. It may be compared to a 



circle without beginning or end. The 
blood travels a distance of six inches in 
one respiration. 

"The twelve main blood vessels are 
deeply hidden between the muscles and 
cannot be seen. Only those on the outer 
ankle are visible because there is nothing 
to hide them. All the blood vessels that 
are on the surface are capillaries (loh). 

"The harmful elements of the rain 
and wind enter the system first through 
the skin. It is then conveyed to the 
arteries (sun) . When these are full it 
goes to the capillaries (loh) and these 
in turn empties into the big veins 
(chin)." 

As to anatomy and dissection: "The 
height of the heavens cannot be ascer- 
tained by man. But the human body 
may be measured on the surface and after 
death it may be dissected and observa- 
tions made as to the size of the organ, 
the capacity of the intestines, the length 
of the arteries, the condition of the blood, 
and the amount of pneuma." 

The internal organs are divided into 
solid or storage organs (tsang) and hol- 
low or eliminative organs (fu). The 
tsangs are the heart, liver, spleen, lungs, 



and kidneys. The fus are the gall blad- 
der, stomach, large intestines, small in- 
testines, and the three "chiao" or con- 
sumptional, eliminative vacuoles. 

The circumference of the small intes- 
tines is given as two and one half inches, 
length, 33 feet, capacity, 2 tous 5 shengs; 
circumference of large intestine is 4 
inches, length 20 feet, capacity, 1 tou 
(all Chou Dynasty units). The small 
intestine is attached to the spine dor- 
sally and to the navel in front. It has 
sixteen convolutions. The total length 
of the alimentary tract is 64 feet and 
four-tenths inch. Other important or- 
gans measured or mentioned are the 
tongue, the oesophagus, pericadium, 
bladder, ligaments, and spleen. 

It is obvious from the above that many 
errors are included in the work. Yet 
it must be admitted that the Chou phy- 
sicians studied objectively. But with the 
introduction of Buddhism medicine was 
cloaked over with medieval philosophy 
and theology and speculation replaced 
experimentation. (The writer is indebt- 
ed to "History of Chinese Medicine", 
by Dr. K. C. Wong and Dr. Wu Lien- 
teh for much of the above data). 



UNION COUNCIL ELECTIONS 

The Chinese Young People's Union 
Council elected the following officers at 
their meeting Tuesday, Feb. 4 at the Chi- 
nese Y. W. C. A.: president, Mrs. An- 
drew Wu; vice-president, Harry Lee; Se- 
cretary, Helen Chan; treasurer, Ira Lee. 
It was decided at the meeting that the 
next Union meeting is to be held at the 
Presbyterian Church on Sunday, Feb. 23 
at 7 p. m. The speaker for the evening 

will be Dr. Gills, pending his acceptance. 

• • 

CHINESE WANTED ON P. T. A. 

Because there are no Chinese on the 
Francisco Junior High School Parent- 
Teacher Association, the faculty of the 
school is inviting parents of its Chinese 
students to attend its meetings. A lun- 
cheon, the first of this term, will be held 
at the school cafeteria on Friday, Feb. 
14, at noon, and parents are urged to 
attend the affair, in furthering the in- 
terests of all students. 



LEAP YEAR PARTY 

The Busy Bees Club, a branch of the 
Girl Reserves of the Y. W. C. A. will 
give a Leap Year Party at Topsy's 
Roost at the Beach on Saturday, Feb. 
28. Mildred Gee is president and spon- 
sor of the affair. Without boys, it 
would hardly be considered a leap year 
party, so members of the male sex are 
cordially urged to attend. 








T A O YUAN 
RESTAURANT 



* $ 

823 Clay St. CHina 0156 

Between Grant and Stockton 

S Meals Unsurpassed in ?) 
J Chinatown jg 

k Also Wines and Liquors 

\}.£?^GS^3£> <Z£F^<Zr*Z$£> S£^<XT !: Zi$ 5 



SHANGHAI GIRL AT 
AMERICAN COLLEGE 

Although enrolled at an American 
college, Wu Kou Liu has so far resisted 
the lure of wearing Western clothes. 
She still wears her native garments at 
Rollins College; where this Oriental at- 
mosphere proves most charming. 

TALENTED ACTRESS IN 
MANDARIN DEBUT 

Beautiful and talented Miss Sui Ling 
Sin, who arrived from China last week 
on the Presdent Polk, made her initial 
debut to the Chinese public recently at 
the Chinese Mandarin Theater, before 
a full house. Miss Sin appeared in the 
starring role of "Queen Dowager." 

It is claimed that Miss Sin is one of 
the most talented young actresses to come 
to the United States, having an enchant- 
ing voice, and a pleasing personality. 
Her engagement at the local theater is 
limited to a short period only. 



Page 10 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



CHINESE LANGUAGE 
SCHOOLS IN CHINA- 
TOWN 

"Once a Chinese always a Chinese" 
seems as applicable to this people as its 
equivalent expression was to the English. 
Perhaps it is this inability to detach 
themselves from their racial origin which 
prompts the Chinese in this country to 
establish Chinese schools for the edu- 
cation of their children in their own 
language and culture. So it is that in 
all communities where there is an aggre- 
gate of Chinese families, no matter how 
few, there will be teachers instructing 
the young to read and write in their 
own tongue. 

In San Francisco's Chinatown is 
found a total of 2004 students, ages from 
6 to 20, enrolled in nine community- 
sponsored evening schools, besides some 
200 pupils in various private schools. 
The following chart will show how these 
students are distributed among the nine 
schools: 

Part-pay Free 

School Enrollment pupils pupils 

Hip Wo 423 64 5 

St. Mary's 380 145 

Chung Wah 331 8 

Young Wo 162 71 

Baptist 158 25 

Nam Kue 155 

Episcopal 145 15 

Cumberland 130 3 

Confucian 120 6 

Total 2004 314 • 28 

Tuition and Curriculum 

The tuition fees vary from 30 cents 
to $2.50 a month, while the private 
schools charge from $2.00 to $5.00. The 
students purchase their own text books, 
writing material, and other equipment. 
In recent years, on account of economic 
conditions, children from large or needy 
families have been admitted either free 
or on a part-pay basis. The figures above 
show that 16 per cent of the total students 
pay a reduced tuition, while 1 per cent 
is exempted from paying any fee at all. 

The children attend these schools usu- 
ally from 5 to 8 p. m. Monday to Friday, 
plus two or three hours on Saturday 
morning. The curriculum, which aims 
to supplement, in Chinese, what the child- 
ren learn in the American schools, in- 
cludes reading and writing, literature, 
poetry, ethics, forensics, gymnastics, etc. 
The graded text books are imported from 
China and have been greatly simplified 



and modernized in the last few years. 
Great emphasis is laid upon the art of 
penmanship and the importance of mem- 
ory work, in the schools. The study of 
Mandarin now occupies an important 
place in the program of the higher 
grades, since unification of the spoken 
language is one of the measures enforced 
in the public schools in China. As may 
be expected, the scholastic standards of 
the shools here compare not so favorably 
with those of the homeland, where Chi- 
nese and not English is the prevalent 
language. 

Of these nine schools, two offer a com- 
plete course from the elementary grades 
through the middle school, five go as 
high as the lower middle school, while 
the remaining two have only elementary 
grades. Almost all the instructors have 
been educated in schools in China, and 
are at least graduates of middle school. 
Enrollment and Support 

The Hip Wo School is operated and 
financed through the coordinated efforts 
of the Chinese Congregational, the Chi- 
nese Methodist, and the Chinese Presby- 
terian Church. The combined enroll- 
ment of this and the other three Protest- 
ant church schools is 856, or 43 per cent 
of the total, while the St. Mary's School, 
maintained by the Chinese Catholic Mis- 
sion, has 19 per cent of the total students. 
The Nam Kue and the Young Wo 
Schools are supported by district organi- 
zations, while the Chung Wah School 
is a community-supported institution. 

In variance with the original organi- 
zation of these schools, religious inclina- 
tion and sectional feeling play little part 
in their enrollment. The proximity of 
location, the rate of tuition, the stan- 
dards of teaching, and other minor con- 
siderations determine in which school a 
child is placed. Roughly speaking, the 
policies, curricula, and methods of teach- 
ing of the different schools are quite 
similar. Although the schools are not 
controlled by the Ministry of Education 
in China, several recent surveys of Chi- 
nese education in the United States by 
representatives of the Chinese National 
Government point to the probability that 
sooner or later, these schools may be 
brought under the jurisdiction of the 
Chinese educational system. 

Necessity of Shorter Hours 

The long hours of study to which these 
children are subjected are, without doubt, 
undermining their health. They do not 
enjoy rest and recreation, nor do they 
have enough sleeping hours. A plan 



for incorporating the Chinese courses as 
part of the American school program has 
been considered by prominent educators 
and social workers of the community, but 
such a proposition has been deemed both 
impractical and inadvisable. A shorten- 
ing of the school hours, at least for the 
younger ones, seem absolutely necessary. 

The arrangement of the school hours 
makes it quite inconvenient for the family 
evening meal, resulting in irregular meals 
for the children. As it is, the majority 
of the children eat a light late lunch, 
before 5 p. m., generally of bread and 
milk, and take their regular evening meal 
after school, around 8 p. m., soon after 
which they retire to bed. Others follow 
the reverse procedure; while a small num. 
ber who live close to the schools manage 
to eat their dinner during the 10 or 15 
minute recess at 6 p. m. A suggestion 
which has offered is to have the lower 
grades in session from 4 to 6 p. m., the 
upper grades from 6:30 to 8:30 p. m., 
thus allowing the families to keep a uni- 
form dinner hour. Some such adjust- 
ment will also shorten the school hours, 
giving the students more free time for 
home study, and will help to relieve the 
present congested conditions in the school 
rooms. 

Inadequate Play Space 

The evening hours are generally di- 
vided into three periods of approximately 
an hour each, with ten or fifteen minutes 
recess between them. In a few schools, 
the two recesses are combined into one 
long recess between the second and third 
periods. In this connection, the problem 
of playground space is a trying one. Only 
three institutions are housed in regular 
school buildings, while the others make 
use of church or other buildings, with 
(Continued on Page 15) 

• • 

ENGLISH EVENING CLASSES 

For Americanization purposes, the 
Emergency Educational Program is fur- 
nishing two full-time instructors to teach 
English to Chinese adults. One of them, 
a Chinese young man, will teach in the 
English evening classes held Monday to 
Friday, 7:00 to 9:00 p. m., at the Chi- 
nese Presbyterian Church. 925 Stockton 
St., while the other will assist at the 
Chinese Episcopal Church, 966 Clay St., 
from 6:45 to 9:15 p. m. 

Each class already has an enrollment 
of over 30 students. With the additional 
teachers, the classes are still open to in- 
terested men and women at a nominal 
charge. 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



CHINE S E DIGEST 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



Page 11 



RANDOM NOTES ON 
LADY PRECIOUS 
STREAM 

One particular day last week Manhat- 
tan's followers of the theatre could read 
in their papers small announcements like 
this: 

Premier TOMORROW EVENING at 8:20 

MORRIS GEST has the honor to present for 

the first time in America 

LADY PRECIOUS STREAM 

By S. I. HSIUNG 

With HELEN CHANDLER and 

BRAMWELL FLETCHER 

Now In Its Second Year in London 

Costumes designed my MEI LAN-FANG 

BOOTH THEATRE, W. 45th St. 

Matinees: First Week: Thursday and Saturday 

Thereafter: Tuesday and Saturday 

So casually was this drama heralded 
that one could take it for granted Chinese 
plays are regular offerings on Broadway. 
Actually the premiere of Wang Pao- 
chuan (the Chinese name of Lady Pre- 
cious Stream) perhaps marks the very 
first time that a classical Chinese drama J — 
adapted into English and fashioned for 
modern consumption, of course — has 
come to Broadway. In making this state- 
ment the reviewer does not forget that 
there have been many Chinese plays given 
in New York during the past decade, 
notably S. Tretiakov's "Roar China" 
and the dramatization of Pearl Buck's 
"Good Earth." But these plays could 
not be considered as truly Chinese be- 
cause, for one thing, they were not writ- 
ten by Chinese, and for another, they 
were not classical dramas. These distinc- 
tions, on the whole, should not make 
any difference, but dramatists seem to 
insist on it. 

With the exception of one Chinese, 
who acted in a minor role, the entire 
cast of the American debut of "Lady 
Precious Stream" consisted of American 
players. The exception is Miss Yuen- 
tsung (Maimie) Sze, who happens to be 
the daughter of Sao-ke Alfred Sze, Chi- 
nese Ambassador to the United States. 
Maimie Sze is round faced, wears her 
hair in bang fashion and withal very 
pretty. She is a Wellesley graduate, and 
while there learned western culture as 
well as to become an expert rower. She 
has spent most of her life in America 
and England, and has not seen China 
since she was five. She is an amateur 
painter; and has never acted on the re- 
gular stage. Her role in "Lady Precious 
Stream" is her first try. 

Although Helen Chandler is acting 
the lead in the play the reviewer has been 
informed that a Chinese stage actress, 



WILLIAM HOY 



Miss Ing Tang Lee, is now on her way 
here from China to take this role. 

The day before the play's opening a 
New York critic remarked that Shih I. 
Hsiung, the adapter and director of 
"Lady Precious Stream", had "crossed a 
lot of land and sea to hurl his fragile 
play against the accepted observation 
that East is East and West is West and 
Broadway is pretty tough." Which was by 
way of saying that the play might be all 
right in its own way but that it was 
problematical whether it would succeed 
on Broadway. 

Of course, the reason Mr. Hsiung 
brought his play over to the United 
States was the enthusiasm and insistence 
of Morris Gest and Lee Shubert, famed 
Broadway producers. The reason for 
these producer's enthusiasm was because 
this particular play had been playing 
over a year in London and was still 
running. Not only had the British play 
going public viewed and waxed enthusia- 
stic over it, but thousands from across 
the Channel had also seen it and ex- 
pressed their admiration for its unique- 
ness and originality of treatment. 

Just before the premiere of "Lady 
Precious Stream" the English translation 
of the play was published. (New York: 
Liverright; $2) The book has some 
beautiful illustrations in monotone by 
one of China's greatest modern painters, 
Hsu Pei-hung, or Ju Peon. 

"Lady Precious Stream" as translated 
into English by Mr. Hsiung, is a classical 
fantasy in modern dress. It has four 
acts, and the theme is one which is com- 
mon in folk tales of all nations. A 
beautiful maiden (Precious Stream) de- 
fies her rich father (Wang Yun, a Prime 
Minister) and marries a poor lad whom 
she loves (Hsieh). This unfilial act on 
the part of Precious Stream causes her 
father to disown her and to refuse to 
recognize the man she marries as his 
son-in-law. The young couple, thus 
thrown on their own resources, had to 
face poverty for many years, but by dint 
of sacrifice, patience, hard work, and 
their devotion to each other, they at last 
acquired wealth and fame, much to the 
chagrin of Precious Stream's father. 

Although most Chinese plays inevi- 
tably carries a moral, there is none in 
"Lady Precious Stream." It is enlivened 
with much humor, and the translator 
has also seen fit to use English idioms 
and modern slang. Some may object to 
such treatment of an old play, but others 



may feel that it is justified. On the 
whole, Mr. Hsiung's knowledge and gen- 
ius as a playwright has fashioned an old 
folk play into a highly interesting and 
original drama for modern enjoyment. 

Interesting is the career of the young 
man — he is only 35 today — who is some- 
thing of a mild sensation in London 
theatrical life. A native of Kiangsi, he 
received his formal education in the only 
place in the country where the atmos- 
phere still breathes of the old classical cul- 
ture of China — Peiping. Peiping, also 
is the center wherein the old drama meets 
the new in an attempt to bring forth a 
new conception of the Chinese drama. 
On the side of the classical drama, Mei 
Lan^fang is the leader, who is working 
toward a revival so that this traditional 
art will not be lost in the present-day 
ceaseless experimentation to achieve some- 
thing new. 

Shih I. Hsiung (pronounced Hung Sik 
Yit in Cantonese) is a proponent of the 
new, realistic drama. He had studied 
painstakingly the classical Chinese stage 
art, but came to the conclusion that if 
the drama is to survive in China it must 
accept new theories, methods, direction. 
And toward that he has worked tirelessly 
for some years. 

In the days of the Student Movement 
(1919) Hsiung was a school-boy of barely 
twenty years. In the literary renaissance 
initiated by this Movement he played his 
part. He finished his education at the 
National University, and later became an 
instructor of the drama there. He read 
the dramatic literature of other nations, 
principally English — as that was the only 
foreign language he had thoroughly 
learned — and translated G. B. Shaw, 
Shakespeare, and James Barrie for the 
new Chinese stage. For amateur acting, 
he also translated several modern Chi- 
nese plays into English and had them 
acted by his students. 

In 1933 Hsiung left his country for 
an extended trip to Europe. He went 
first to England, then Germany, France, 
Belgium, and Holland. He went back 
to England a year later, and found the 
British were interested in the Chinese 
classical drama. Deciding to give them 
a good dose of it, he produced "Lady 
Precious Stream" with an English cast, 
in modern English, but retained the Chi- 
nese style of acting and Chinese lack of 
scenery. Much to his surprise, the play 
elicited interest and enthusiasm. When 
Hsiung was invited by Morris Gest to 
(Continued on Page 15) 



Page 12 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo- 



Charity Begins at Home 

(SPORTORIAL) 

During the past few years the people 
of San Francisco's Chinatown have don- 
ated thousands of dollars to the Com- 
munity Chest, the Chinese Hospital, and 
sundry other organizations — a worthy way 
to spend money. At the same time, it 
goes to prove that the Chinese are not 
niggards when it comes to the cause of 
charity. However, worthy though they 
are, it is a simple truth that charity begins 
at home and home in this case means 
Chinatown, the place that needs it most. 

It is said that there are two vital factors 
in anyone's life, the guiding factors of 
heredity and environment. Charity won't 
change the heredity of our children after 
they are born, but will effect the environ- 
ment. " — tan palo, tan arbol — " as an 
old Spanish proverb goes meaning that 
one grows up as trained. 

Chinatown today needs and should 
have a community recreation center, 
where the young people of all of China- 
town may have free access. Bodies of 
strong boys and girls are built by physical 
exercise and athletics. And an outdoor 
gymnasium where they may indulge in 
basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, and 
other forms of body-building sports, is 
greatly needed. 

There are two gymnasiums in China- 
town, but one is limited to members; and 
the other charges a small fee for the 
various classes. 

Prominent and influential merchants, 
do something for your young China! 

• • 

TWO MORE TEAMS FOR J. A. F. 

Two midget basketball teams represent- 
ing the Chinese Y. M. C. A.— the 80 
pound Tigers and the 100 pound All- 
Stars, are entered in the coming J. A. F. 
Basketball tournament, according to Lee 
Crichton, physical director. The Bulldogs, 
coached by William Wong, have already 
entered, making it a total of three fives, 
in the league from the Chinese "Y". 

Members of the squads: 
All-Stars: Fong You, Chin Young, 
Wallace Choy, Raymond Lym, Joseph 
Chin, Alfred Lee, Leejan Wong, Robert 
Poon, Johnson Lee, William Mar and 
Harry Tong. 

Tigers: Henry S. Wong, David Chin, 
Frank Fong, Frank Yim, Jack Yim, Wal- 
lace Poon, Willie Lee, Wilfred Leong, 
Edwin Lowe, David Chang, Ernest Hong 
and Lee Quock Jow. 



Chinese Playground Wins 
Five Titles 

All five basketball teams entered by 
the local Chinese Playground in the re- 
cent playground tournament walked off 
with division championships, winning 
five out of the seven divisions. Observ- 
ers believe that if the other two divisions 
were represented the Chinese would more 
than likely have won them. The players 
will receive medals for awards. 

Members of the various title-winning 
teams are: 

130 pound, Sill Chan, Willie Ong, 
Alan Lee, William Chan, Albert Sun Lee, 
Mike Lee, Albert Lew and Richard Wong. 

120 pound, Stanford Fong, Frank 
Chan, John Wong, Richard Lum, Chaun- 
cey Yip, Faye Lowe, Chester Wong, 
George Chin, Dan Chan and Charles Ng. 

100 pound, Johnson Lee, Wallace 
Choy, Chew Young, William Mah, Al- 
fred Lee and Lok Jung Chin. 

90 pound, George Yee, Albert Lee, 
Chor Lai, Joseph Chew, Robert Lum, 
John Wong and Benny Lee. 

80 pound, David Chang, Henry Sing 
Wong, Wilfred Wong, Frank Fong, 
Theodore Fong, Jack Yim, Frank Yim, 
Ernest Hong, Harry Chin and John Chin. 

• • 

MARBLE TOURNEY 

San Francisco Recreation Commis- 
sion's first annual Marble Tournament 
will be held Feb. 15, with entries due 
not later than Feb. 13. Entries must be 
handed to the playground director by 
that date. There will be three classes, 
the winner of each class receiving an 
award, for both boys and girls, which are 
as follows: 1. Through nine years, 2. 
Through 12 years, 3. Through 15 years. 

For rules and further details, see Oli- 
ver Chang, director, at the Chinese Play- 
ground. 

• • 

SALINAS BEATS WATSONVILLE 

A field goal by E. Chin saved Watson- 
ville's "B" basketball team from a shut- 
out at the hands of the Salinas Chinese 
quintet last Friday. Final score was 26-2. 

Frank Chin with eight points and Dia- 
mond Yee with six were the high-scorers 
for the winners, while Tommy Jung, 
Stanley and David Chung and Jack Lew 
turned in creditable performances. Park- 
er Chan was outstanding for Watson- 
ville. Another game is being arranged 
by Salinas with their "A" squad. 



Young Chinese Wallop 
Japanese 

Berkeley Nissei Japanese Club's highly 
touted basketball team was handed a 
thorough shellacking by the Young Chi- 
nese Athletic Club of Oakland by a score 
of 29-20 at the Westlake Junior High 
School court, Oakland, in a recent game. 

Trailing at the end of the first quarter, 
the Chinese five staged a whirlwind rally 
in the second quarter to overtake the 
Nippons and forged ahead, keeping the 
lead throughout the remainder of the 
tilt and checking the feeble threats of the 
Japanese to win out. 

Key Chinn with thirteen points and 
Shane Lew with six led the victors in 
scoring, with Stanton Yee, Julius Yee, 
Art Lee, Herbert Louie and Bob Chow 
also playing exceptionally well. For the 
losers, "Mas" Yamamoto, U. C. light- 
weight star, was outstanding. 

• • 

V 

499 CONSECUTIVE FREE THROWS 

What probably is a world's record for 
consecutive free throws is held by Harry 
Leavitt, who made 499 shots without miss- 
ing, last year in Chicago before 4,000 
spectators. Leavitt's best previous marks 
were 425 and 316. 

This record is worth trying to beat. 
Last week, the Chinese Y. M. C. A. held 
a free throw tourney, in which the high- 
est marks recorded were 21 out of a pos- 
sible 25. Quite a difference! Still, the 
mark of 499 could be beat. Just make 

500 and all would be well. 

• • 
SHANGTAI OVERCOMES 
LEAD TO WIN GAME 

Overcoming a big lead during the 
early minutes of the game, a fighting 
Shangtai hoop team scored a 27-17 vic- 
tory over the Rovers, in their City Re- 
creation League contest Monday night 
at Francisco court. 

The Rovers, piling up a 7-0 lead at the 
opening, managed to be ahead at half, 
9-7. However, they were completely out- 
played and outfought during the entire 
second half. George Lee, with fourteen 
points, led Shangtai's scoring attack. 
Charlie Hing, Allen Lee Po and Fred 
Hing turned in sterling performances to 
aid the Chinese team to remain in the 
race for a possible division championship. 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 13 




Possible New Basketball 
League 

On account of the fact that basket- 
ball has returned, to its height of 
popularity, Chan Foo of Quong Kee 
Jan Co. and. Arthur Hee of Shangtai 
signified their intentions to sponsor 
a Chinese league the latter part of 
February or early in March. How- 
ever, Chan and Hee stated that there 
must be at least six teams willing to 
join before it will be started, and 
added that, all clubs who intend to 
join the new league will please com- 
municate with the sports department 
of the Chinese Digest. They extend 
an invitation to all local, East Bay 
and peninsula clubs to express their 
willingness. 



Foul Shot Tournament 
Results 

Complete and final results of the Chi- 
nese Y. M. C. A. Foul Shot Tournament 
were announced a few days ago by Lee 
Crichton, physical director. The newly- 
crowned foul shot champs of the Chinese 
Community for 1936 are as follows, with 
the second and third place winners: 

70 pound, won by Henry Sing Wong; 
2nd, Frederick Hong; 3rd, Frank Fong. 
80 pound, won by Jack Seid; 2nd, 
Jack Quon; 3rd, Theodore Pong. 

90 and 100 pound, won by Robert 
Lum; 2nd, Matthew Fong; 3rd, Robert 
Poon. 

110 and 120 pound, won by Billy Lee; 
2nd, David Chong; 3rd, Henry Kan. 

130 pound, won by Francis Mark, 2nd, 
Charlie Louie, 3rd, Henry Mew. 

145 pound and unlimited, won by Don 
Lee. 2nd, Daniel Leong; 3rd, Henry Ow- 
yang. 

Don Lee, Francis Mark and Billy Lee 
made the highest scores, sinking 21 out 
of a possible 25, according to Mr. Crich- 
ton, who conducted the event. 



SPORTS SHORTS 

Two Chinese hoop teams, the Troop 
Three Scout 120's and the Shangtai 
130's, are entered in the coming P. A. A. 
lightweight basketball tournament. 

The newly-organized Quong Kee Jan 
cage team sponsored by Chan Foo will 
be managed by his brother, Arthur. 



The two best basketball games seen 
so far during the current season at French 
Court were the Troop Three Varsity- 
Shangtai and the Varsity-League All- 
Stars contests. Quite a few fans have 
remarked that they most certainly would 
like to witness another Varsity-Shangtai 
game. If that were only possible, what 
a colossal crowd would be there! 

Last Friday night, Shangtai, with Allen 
Lee Po "Luisetti-ing" the opposition, 
swamped the Y. M. I. team from Croc- 
kett, 64-48, at the Chinese "Y" gym, in 
a rough-and-tumble high scoring basket- 
ball game. Po sank 25 points to lead 
all scoring, with George Lee and Charles 
Hing also figuring in the digit column 
prominently. 



Eddie Leong, Troop Three Varsity 
player, is performing on the first string 
University of California 130-pound bas- 
ketball squad. 



Troop Three Scout Juniors traveled 
across the bay and sprang a surprise on 
the Berkeley Chinese A. G, upsetting its 
quintet by a score of 54-29 last Saturday 
night. Al Young and Ted Moy starred 
for the J. V. 

Establishing himself as a potential can- 
didate for the mythical All-City team, 
Hin Chin led the Commerce High '30s 
to a 27-17 victory over Balboa Hi last 
week at Kezar Pavilion, by scoring 10 
points. 



Fred Hong Wong did his best to win 
for Poly Varsity against Sacred Heart, 
but in vain, the Parrots losing 27-14. 
However, Wong is a much-feared for- 
ward now, making eight points against 
the Irish's tight defense. Steve Leong 
likewise did a good job for Galileo, al- 
though they were defeated by Lowell. 



Nationals In Local Debut 

Chinatown's newest-formed basketball 
team, the Nationals, will make its initial 
bow to the public at French Court this 
Sunday evening, with the preliminary 
slated for 7:15 p. m. 

Casaba fans will be interested in the 
showing of the National five, its roster 
including several well-known players. Al- 
though it will enter the contest a slight 
favorite to defeat their opponents, the 
Chi-Fornians, it will not by any means 
be facing a set-up team. The Chi-Forn- 
ians, looking forward to next season, 
have been bolstered recently by the addi- 
tion of new players. It will be a close 
game, with an unexpected result highly 
probable. 

The preliminary brings together the 
Troop Three Junior Varsity and the 
Chan Yings, coached by Richard Ong, 
former cage star. Members of the Chan 
Yings have been performing together 
since they were eighty-pounders and who 
at present average around 130 pounds. 
However, the Juniors have an up-and 
coming quintet, and may be slightly fa- 
vored, due partly to their clean-cut up- 
set win over the Berkeley Chinese last 
week. 

Likewise, this will be Chan Yings' first 
public appearance. Two years ago, the 
Chan Yings upset the Scout Juniors in 
P. A. A. 110 pounds. It is reported 
that the Juniors will be out to revenge 
their defeat. Tentative starting line-up 
for Chan Yings: forwards, William Chan 
and Charles Louie; center, Captain Hen- 
ry Mew; guards, Henry Wong and Ge- 
orge Kan. 

• • 

YOUNG CHINESE 

COPS TWO GAMES 

Oakland's Young Chinese Club hoop- 
sters won two contests in as many played 
during the past few days. On Feb. 3, 
it defeated the Berkeley Chinese A. C. 
at the Wilson Jr. High court, 34-28, 
playing without the services of two re- 
gulars, Edwin Chan and Howard Joe. 
Trailing at half time, the Young Chinese 
came back strong to take the game. Key 
Chinn and Shane Lew starred for the 
winners, while Chong Lee and G. Jue 
played well for Berkeley. 

By a score of 43-41, the Young Chi- 
nese won from the Maxwell Hardware, 
last Thursday at the McClymonds Hi 
gym. Although the final tally was close, 
the Chinese five led from start to finish, 
with Key Chinn running wild by hooping 
22 points. Wilkes was outstanding for 
Maxwell. 



Page 14 



CHINESE DICEST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Coolidge (San Francisco) 
Feb. 12; President Taft (San Francisco) 
Mar. 3; President McKinley (Seattle) 
Mar. 4; President Hoover (San Francisco) 
Mar. 11; President Grant (Seattle) Mar. 
18; President Pierce (San Francisco) 
Mar. 31; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Apr. 1. President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Apr. 8; President Jackson (Se- 
attle) Apr. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Apr. 28; President McKinley 
(Seattle) Apr. 29. 
SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Pierce (San Francisco) Feb. 
7; President Garfield (San Francisco) 
Feb. 14; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Feb. 15; President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Feb. 21; President Harrison (San 
Francisco) Feb. 28; President Jackson 
(Seattle) Feb. 29; President Lincoln 
(San Francisco) Mar. 6; President Hayes 
(San Francisco) Mar. 13. President Mc- 
Kinley (Seattle) Mar. 14; President Hoo- 
ver (San Francisco) Mar. 20; President 
Wilson (San Francisco) Mar. 27; Presi- 
dent Grant (Seattle) Mar. 28. 
_ - 

CHINESE GENERAL FETED 
AT DINNER 

Boston, Mass. — Honoring General 
Fong Jin, who is active in patriotic move- 
ments, the Soo Yuen Tong Association 
held a meeting and a dinner party at 
the Jui Hang Low, with representatives 
of the Chung Wah Association and the 
On Leong Tong Association also attend- 
ing. 

The General spoke on the promising 
future of China and the possible recov- 
ering of lost territory. His speech, given 
in Mandarin, was translated into Canton- 
ese by Chan Quong Yin, and was hailed 
with • much enthusiasm and much 
applause. 

The general will speak in the t.car 
future on the suoject of ,he defense of 
China before the Chinese of Boston. 



CLIPPER TO LEAVE FEB. 9 

Delayed since Dec. 22 due to bad wea- 
ther, the China Clipper of the Pan- 
American Airways will hop off on Sun- 
day, Feb. 9, it was reported. It will start 
its take-off at the Alameda Airport, pick- 
ing up mail at Honolulu and thence to 
Manila. No passengers will be carried on 
this trip, it was learned. 

The China Clipper's sister airship, the 
Philippines Clipper, is scheduled to take 
off on Wednesday, Feb. 19. 
• • 

AVIATION STUDENT GRADUATES 

Rated as one of the best students, 
Wong Chong graduated recently from 
the Aeronautical School of Aviation at 
Los Angeles, one of the outstanding air 
schools in America. It is reported that 
he will soon journey to China where he 
hopes to serve his mother country. 

There are many Chinese youths study- 
ing aviation at the school, and working 
in the factories to study mechanical and 
engineering parts. 

• • 

NARROW AIR ACCIDENT 

George Wong, Chinese flying student 
of San Francisco, and his instructor, Lt. 
William Fillmore, head of the Fillmore 
Flying Service, narrowly averted a crash 
last Wednesday when the plane they 
were landing collided with another just 
as they were landing. Wong was piloting 
the plane at the time, at the Oakland 
airport. 



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CHINA TARIFFS 

According to indications from press 
reports, the Finance Minister of China 
will begin in March the enforcement of 
the revised export tariff published last 
June. It was also announced by the Fin- 
ance Minister that the final date for the 
exchanging of silver currency into legal 
tender notes has been extended from Feb. 
3 to May 3, 1936. 

• • 

HERBALIST SUICIDE 

Low Chut Horn, a local Chinese her- 
balist, was found dead at his Jackson 
Street office Monday afternoon by the 
janitor, who reported to the police. 

Low, who was about thirty-six years of 
age, returned recently from China, it 
was reported. The coroner who inves- 
tigated found fourteen cents in his poc- 
kets and a passport. A check stub bear- 
ing a Hong Kong mark was also found 
among his possessions. It was believed 
by the polie and friends that he commit- 
ted suicide, caused, apparently, by fin- 
ancial reverses. 

• • 
MEN SUPERIOR! 

In the recent Chinese civil service ex- 
aminations held in Nanking men proved 
their superiority over the fair sex. Among 
the 3,000 applicants for government 
positions, several hundred were women. 
Yet, out of the 240 who successfully 
passed their examinations, only three 

were women. 

• • 

Old fashioned Chinese drugs, which 
have been used in China for many cen- 
turies, are being supplanted rapidly by 
western medicinals, which are mostly 
from the United States. 

• • 

YOKE CHOY PARTY POSTPONED 

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the 
Yoke Choy formal sheduled for Feb. 8 
at the Italian Room of the St. Francis 
Hotel has been postphoned until the 
fifteenth of February. 

• • 

A daughter was born on Jan. 30 to 
the wife of Wong Doo Wing, 1044 Clay 
Street, San Francisco. 



Friday, February 7, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 15 



COMMUNITY WELFARE 

(Continued from Page 10) 
inadequate play space for such large 
numbers. The Chinese Playground and 
the play yards of the Commodore Stock- 
ton School, the community public school, 
are conveniently near to several of the 
Chinese shools, but sad to say, they are 
kept closed in the evenings in spite of 
many petitions to have them opened and 
illuminated for the use of these evening 
schools and of the children of the com- 
munity. The children are, therefore, 
forced to crowd into whatever yard space 
there is, or to play on adjacent streets 
or alleys, often impeding traffic and ex- 
posing themselves to many hazards. For- 
tunately, through the careful vigilance 
of the teachers, very few accidents have 
occurred. 

Willing Attendance 
Attendance at the language schools 
has become a habit with the children in 
this community, and they accept this pro- 
gram willingly and without grudge. 
There are, however, more than 3000 
children in the American schools of ele- 
mentary grades and high school grades, 
leaving a balance of over 800 children 
who do not study in the Chinese schools. 
Probably those in kindergarten grades 
in American schools, too young to attend 
also the evening schools, and those in 
senior high school, too occupied with 
American studies to continue their Chi- 
nese education, account for a large num- 
ber of this group. There aro also those 
high school students who work in the 
evenings to supplement their family in- 
come, those whose families cannot afford 
to provide for them both Chinese and 
American education, and those whose 
poor health or underweight condition 
does not permit them to undertake such 
a heavy school program. At any rate, 
those who consider themselves thorough- 
ly Americanized and in no need of Chi- 
nese education are very few. 



RANDOM NOTES ON 
"LADY PRECIOUS STREAM" 

(Continued from Page 11) 
produce the same play in America, the 
playwright accepted and left England in 
October. But the play was still running 
in London, after a year and a half. 

Accompanying Hsiung to America was 
his first, small, pretty Dymia Tsai, who 
writes poetry and has no knowledge of 
English. 

Like many conservative American play- 
wrights Hsiung has little love for the 
cinema art. In an interview after his 
arrival in New York he acknowledged 
the fact that the movies were doing con- 
siderable damage to the stage in China. 
He recalled that when he was last in 
Peiping, there were from twenty to thirty 
legitimate theatres there and only one 
cinema house, whereas to-day there are 
five cinema places and only half as many 
legitimate theatres as before. The same 
thing holds true in Shanghai, he said, 
where there are fifty or sixty moving 
picture houses. 

Asked about the difference, if any, 
between the theatrical art in China and 
America, Hsiung had a swift answer, and 
he delivered it with a happy smile. 

"We have no critics in China," he said. 

HELP WANTED 

Chinese Help Wanted — 
F. D. Andrews, 2828 Forrest Ave., 
Berkeley .... Berkeley 6722J 



Chinese Maid — 

B. B. Grunwald, 1600 San Jose, 
Alameda .... Alameda 4466J 



Boy to Cook — Not A Student 
Dean Gettel, 959 Spruce, 

Berkeley .... AShberry 2160 

Girl For Housework — 3-4 hours Daily 
Mrs. Hamlin, 2601 Parker, 
Berkeley .... AShberry 5341 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 




Sir: Enclosed find # for__ .... .... 


period of The Chinese Digest. 
Name__ 


Address 


City State 

Six Months #1.25; 1 Year #2.00;Foreign $2.75 Year. 



U. S. DIPLOMAS BIG HELP 
FOR GOVERNMENT JOBS 

Nanking — A diploma from a big Uni- 
ted States university is more effective 
in obtaining a government position here 
than a sheepskin from a university of 
some other foreign country, a survey 
by a U. S. university club in Nanking 
reveals. The investigation showed that 
nearly half of the 640 Chnese alumni 
of 74 U. S. Colleges and universities are 
employed by the government in educa- 
tional, administrative, medical or techni- 
cal activities. 

The survey also shows that Columbia 
has the largest graduate colony in China's 
capital, the number being 61, while Cor- 
nell has 36, Harvard 29, Michigan Uni- 
versity 26, and Chicago University 22. 

The majority of the American uni- 
versity graduates who are not employed 
by the government are engaged in busi- 
ness and the professions. 

• • 
CHINESE STORES ROBBED! 

Due to recent robberies in Chinatown, 
the Chinese Chamber of Commerce and 
the Chinese Consulate have taken the 
matter up with the San Francisco Police 
Department to investigate these robberies. 
It has been urged that the Chinatown 
squad co-operate with the Chinese com- 
munity in protecting merchants. 

Wung Fat Jewelry Co. on Jackson 
Street was recently robbed of jewelry 
worth approximately four hundred and 
fifty dollars, when burglars broke the 
show windows. Likewise, the Fat Ming 
Book Store on Grant Avenue had its 
windows broken and merchandise valued 
over a hundred dollars were taken, early 
one morning. 

• • 

AGED CHINESE INJURED BY AUTO 

Chow Quong Ton, a sixty-year old 
Chinese, who lives at 855 Stockton St., 
suffered minor injuries when he was run 
down by an automobile at Third and 
Market Streets on Tuesday. Rushed to 
the Emergency Hospital, Chow was treat- 
ed and returned home. 

• • 
#20,000 LOTTERY WINNER 
RETURNS TO CHINA 

Lee Yoke Wing, who recently won 
#20,000 in a lottery in Central America, 
arrived in San Francisco on board the 
S. S. President Pierce on his way back 
to his homeland, China. At present, Mr. 
Lee is staying in San Francisco for a 
brief visit, stopping at a local hotel. 



Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 7, 1936 





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See these instruments here, 

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E 



Vol. 2, No. 7 



February 14, 1936 



Five Cents 



CURRENT NEWS ABOUT CHINA 



By Tsu Pan 



• SHANSI REGIMENTATION 

• ANOTHER SINO-JAPANESE INCIDENT 

• U. S. LEGISLATORS MAD 

Chinese statesmen and economists are watching with 
keen interest today the administration of Shansi pro- 
vince in its experiment of a new economic policy. If 
this experiment should prove successful, other pro- 
vinces would soon follow its pattern. 

The new plan owes its authorship to General Yen 
Hsi-san, one time military governor of Shansi and at 
present vice-chairman of the Military Affairs Com- 
mission of the National Government. The theme of 
General Yen's doctrine includes the redistribution of 
land, state control of commerce, issuance of provincial 
fiat money as medium of exchange, adjustment and 
equalization of the balance of trade between provinces, 
and taxation to "soak the rich". 

By state ownership of agriculture and industry, the 
plan attempts to regulate the production and consump- 
tion of the whole province, making it a self sufficient 
community. All products are to be turned over to a pro- 
vincial commissary for exchange of fiat money with 
which the producer may obtain his individual needs at 
the same place. The provincial authorities declared 
that the plan will take ten years to complete. 

Although the people of Shansi are still speculative 
about General Yen's theory, work is already in progress, 
aiming toward its realization. At Tai-yuan, the capital 
of the province, four warehouses of colossal scale, and 
a chain of commissary stores have been established for 
the distribution of the provincially owned commodities. 
One million dollars' worth of the "new money" is also 
in circulation, according to reports. 

The real aim of the change, it is learned, is to put 
the economy of the province on a solvent basis so that 
its people may gather sufficient material to defeat the 
communist movements within its borders, and, ultim- 
ately, to face the extension of Japanese influence from 
the Hopei Chahar regions. 



The government officials in south China obtained 
a breathing spell last week after hearing that the Swa- 
tow incident was brought to a close. 

The incident involved a Japanese constable attached 



to the Japanese Consulate at Swatow who was murdered 
some time ago during his off duty hours. The Japanese 
charged that the murder was plotted by the Chinese. 
Serious protests were lodged against the Swatow muni- 
cipal government by Japanese authorities. The Jap- 
anese demanded that unless the local government sur- 
renders the assailant, apologizes to the Japanese, guar- 
antees that such incident will not repeat, etc., etc., they 
will take drastic action. 

It is to be remembered that when the Japanese began 
action in Manchuria on the eventful night of Septem- 
ber 18, 1931, their excuse was that a section of the 
Japanese owned South Manchuria Railway, twelve 
inches in length, was blown off by a Chinese. If this 
flimsy excuse could lead to the Manchurian catastrophe, 
there will be no telling as to what the present murder 
affair may lead to, if the Japanese constable was really 
killed by a Chinese. And it appeared that the Japanese 
were well prepared for any eventuality as they sent 
four warships to anchor at the Swatow harbor. 

Finally, the Japanese themselves declared that the 
Chinese had nothing to do with the murder case. 



Infuriated all of a sudden last week were the legis- 
lators of the United States over Japanese aggression 
in Asia, and unreserved statements sallied forth by 
these high officials warned the islanders that the world 
is not unaware of their mischievousness. Expressing 
their resentment in unison were Congressman William 
I. Sirovich of New York, Senator James Hamilton 
Lewis of Illinois, and Senator Key Pittman of Nevada. 

From Senator Pittman comes a vehement statement 
charging Japan's actions in China as a threat to the 
United States and to the "open-door" principle. He 
advocates a strong naval and air force for the United 
States until there is a universal respect and obedience 
to international treaties. 

"Of course the Congress will not be bulldozed into 
the abandonment of our national defense, the protec- 
tion of our legitimate foreign trade or our commerce 
with China," Senator Pittman declared. "The Japanese 
propagandists are apparently attempting to influence 
the good, peace-loving people of this country through 
deceptive articles and threats of war, with the obvious 
purpose of having public sentiment restrain the proper 
action of our government." 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



OAKLAND NEWS 

The Oakland. Chinese Center members 
are sporting distinctive emblems on the 
lapels of their coats. Miniature in size, 
modern in design and golden in hue, 
these badges are symbolic of membership 
in a club whose chief aim is expressively 
for the betterment of the Chinese com- 
munity and its youth. 



Because Worley Wong "renigged" on 
a scheduled luncheon through a techni- 
cality, the Wa Sung committee on enter- 
tainment met in a local cafe last Sunday 
to formulate plans for their approaching 
raffle and amateur contest at the Frater- 
nity Hall in the I. O. O. F. building. 
The group decided to offer three prizes 
to a trio of winners who captures the 
most popular acclaim of the audience 
that evening. Application blanks may 
be secured at the office of the Chinese 
Digest in San Francisco or from Joe Lee 
at 170 7th St., Oakland. 



The Chinese Youth Circle will offici- 
ally announce its formation with an open 
house night tomorrow. Fifty members 
will convene in the club-house on 8th 
Street on this occasion. Brief speeches, 
a skit and entertainment by members will 
occupy the early part of the evening 
with dancing, games, mah jong and re- 
freshments to follow. 



At its meeting, the Wa Sung Club 
voted to present a silver loving cup to 
the winner of the amateur contest instead 
of cash prizes. Two other prizes, as yet 
undecided, will be given to second and 
third place winners. 



The International House provided the 
setting for the Sigma Omicron Pi Sor- 
ority tea last Saturday afternoon and the 
members spent a congenial afternoon. 
Girls from the following schools attended: 
Mills College, University of California, 
San Mateo J. O, San Francisco State 
Teachers' College and San Francisco J. C. 

Active members in the sorority are 
Gertrude Dun, president; Ada Chan, vice- 
president; Nui Bo Tang, secretary; Toy 
Len Lee treasurer; Elizabeth Hall, Flora 
Hall, Jeanette Dun, Nancy Lim and Mae 
Lim. Eight other members are in China. 
• • 

A Leap Year Dance was sponsored 
two weeks ago by the Lowa Athletic Club 
of Los Angeles, with a large crowd attend- 
ing the function. 



"Heartaches" to Be Shown 
This Week 

Cathay Pictures' super singing and 
talking picture, "Heartaches," will be 
shown at the local Mandarin Theater 
this Saturday and Sunday, with Wei Kim 
Fong, stage star, in the leading role. 

"Heartaches" is financed by Quon Yi 
Lum, and produced by Esther Eng and 
Bruce Wong, with Paul Ivano, formerly 
Gloria Swanson's best cameraman, doing 
the camera work. Story and direction 
are by Frank Tong and Henry Tung. 

The story concerns an aviation stu- 
dent in America, Ching, played by Beal 
Wong, who falls in love with an opera 
star, Fong, played by Wei Kim Fong. 
The manager of the opera company, 
jealous of Fong's constant rendezvous 
with Ching, threatens to discharge her 
and send her back to China. 

Ching finishes his training, goes to war 
in China, and is separated from his loved 
one. While in China, he marries and 
Fong, hearing about it, is heartbroken. 

Capacity attendance is expected to wit- 
ness this stirring film. All of the players 
in the cast, with the exception of the 
star, are American-Chinese. Miss Eng 
with Miss Fong, will journey shortly to 
China to seek prospective film sars for 
their coming productions. They will stay 
in China for two months. 

The present picture will also be shown 
in Singapore in the near future. 

• • 

CHINESE FRANCISCANS ELECT 

Francisco Junior High School's Chi- 
nese High Nine Club held its first meet- 
ing of the semester at the Chinese Y. M. 
C. A. last week, with thirty members 
attending. Election of officers was held, 
with the following results: Vincent Gunn, 
president; Billy Lee, vice-president; Ber- 
tha Jann, treasurer; Rose Choy, secretary; 
David Chong, boy's athletic manager; 
Rose Pon, girl's athletic manager. Mrs. 
Pearson, a member of the school faculty, 
is the advisor of the club. 




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Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and 



Y. M. D. VALENTINE DANCE 

A dance of hearts, sponsored by the 
Chinese Y. M. C. A. Boys Work Com- 
mittee, will be given tonight at the "Y" 
gym in honor of St. Valentine. This 
is the first social event for the 1936 sea- 
son of the Y. M. D. 

Among those working in preparation 
for this affair are: activities secretary, 
Henry S. Tom; chairman, Teddy Lee; 
decorations, Wahso Chan; reception, 
George Ong and Albert Gee; invitations, 
Henry Owyang; music, William Wong; 
and entertainment, William Jow. 

• • 

San Antonio, Texas — The Chinese 
young men about town played the gallant 
hosts to local Chinese fair maidens at a 
surprise Valentine Party last night. The 
bright and absorbing occasion was held 
at the hall of the Chinese Waku School, 
with games, refreshments and dancing 
for the entire evening. 

• • 
BIRTHDAY PARTY 

Over twenty friends of Mrs. Donald 
Lai attended the birthday party given 
to her by her sister-in-law, Elveria, at 
her home, 130 7th Street, Oakland, Sat- 
urday night. Mah jong and card games 
were the mainstays in the evening's enter- 
tainment. Buffet was served shortly be- 
fore midnight. 

• • 
HONOLULU CIVIC 
COMMITTEES NAMED 

At its initial meeting of the new. ad- 
ministration, committees for the Hawaii 
Chinese Civic Association were appointed 
by its president, Theodore C. H. Char. 
It was decided at the meeting that the 
organization's annual banquet will be 
held Feb. 22 at the Waialae Golf Club. 

Following are the chairmen of the 
various committees: finance, A. B. Lau; 
membership, Dr. Stephen Young; pro- 
gram, E. N. Awana; publicity, James 
Chun; legal, Ernest Eng; welfare. Dr. 
H. Q. Pang; legislative, Peter Chu; loin 
fund, Mrs. Chang; investigation, Hiram 
Fong; and rural service. Hung Lum 
Chung. 

• • 

AIR MECHANICS, CONTACT! 

Word has been received that there are 
many openings for mechanics with air- 
craft building inclinations to serve the 
Chinese Government. Anyone who is in- 
terested in such a career is requested to 
write for information to the Government 
Aircraft Factory, Hangchow, China. 
Better Paper 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 

Miss Dorothy Lung opened her home 
to the Los Angeles Junior College Cathay 
Cultural Club for their term ending party 
on the evening of Jan. 31. Several card 
games and mah jong tables were in ses- 
sion when Mr. Bates, the advisor of the 
club, stepped on to the auctioneer's plat- 
form and called for bidders — the pack- 
ages were brought to the party by mem- 
bers and friends of the club to be auc- 
tioned off for the benefit of the club. 
Quite a sum was raised with this novel 
idea. Later, the party swung over to 
an evening of delightful dancing. . . . 
Eats galore, spaghetti, cakes, and sand- 
wiches of all kinds topped off the evening. 



The enrollment of Chinese students at 
the L. A. J. C. this year totals 30, the 
largest group of Chinese to register at 
this college. One of the most prominent 
new students is (Barbara Quon, who won 
the Ephbian honors at Jefferson High 
School. Other students are: Amy June 
Wong, formerly of Lowell High, San 
Francisco; Lillie Jang of Courtland; Al- 
ice Lee of Long Beach; Mary Jue, Lucille 
Lee, Albert Lew, Stephen Tong, Joseph 
Lung, George Jue, George Tom and Ed- 
win Louie, former editor of the student 
publication at Polytechnic High, L. A. 



A Valentine party was given by the 
girls of the Congregational Church 
Young People at the International Insti- 
tute, with the young men of the Y. P. 
and their friends as guests. Misses Al- 
drina Lamb and Daisy Dong were in 
charge of the program, with Misses Mar- 
garette Leong, Emma Quon and Barbara 
Quon planning the refreshments. 

Under the sponsorship of Mrs. May 
Wong, the Mei Wah Club held its election 
at a meeting on Feb. 5. The officers 
for the new year are: Cleo Chow, presi- 
dent; Esther Lew, vice-president; Eleanor 
Soo Hoo, secretary; Frances Wong trea- 
surer; May Tom, basketball captain; and 
Florence Ung, historian. 

Jones Ching of Fresno became the 
proud father of a baby boy on Feb. 1. 
Mrs. Ching, formerly Miss Ruth Leong 
of Bakersfield, is reported doing nicely. 
The baby is as yet unnamed, and sugges- 
tions are welcome. 

Lee Wong, former San Franciscan, 
recently married the lovely Olga Ung 
of Los Angeles. 



The L. A. J. C. Chinese Students' Club 
held its first meeting of the new semester 
on Feb. 6. New officers of the club 
were installed by the outgoing president, 
Winnie Jang. The new cabinet: Elmer 
Leung, president; Frances Quon, vice- 
president; and Dorothy Lung, secretary- 
treasurer. 



Fifteen Chinese students received high 
school diplomas during the month of 
January, with Polytechnic leading in 
number with nine, namely, Nellie Lew, 
Lucille Lee, Edwin Louie, Hayward Tom, 
Stephen Tong, Albert Lew, Jue Chee and 
George Jue and George Tom. The lone 
graduate from Fairfax High was Joseph 
Lung, and from Lincoln High, Mary Jue. 
Constance Tom and Paul King graduated 
from Manual Arts High, and the follow- 
ing from Jefferson: Julia Ung, Frances 
Wong, Anna Woo, Barbara Quon and 
Suey Woo. 

• • 

Gilbert Yang of Honolulu is enrolled 
in the dental college of Washington Uni- 
versity in Missouri, while William Lee 
is studying at the University of Missouri 
as an exchange student from the Uni- 
versity of Hawaii. 

• • 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheng Wong of 115 
Eighth St., Oakland, became the parents 
of a daughter on Jan. 28. 




CLEARANCE SALE 

Suits and Overcoats 

From $14.75 UP 

(KZX) 

WE INVITE YOU 

TO OPEN A CHARGE 

ACCOUNT WITH US — 

90 DAYS TO PAY 




rc//ujc 



men/ /h«,» 



742 GRANT AVENUE 

—CHINA 1500— 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



REGISTER NOW! 

To facilitate registration of local Chi- 
nese Americans, the San Francisco lodge 
of the Chinese American Citizens Alli- 
ance, better known as the Chinese Native 
Sons, is cooperating with the local Re- 
gistrar of Voters in this regard. A de- 
puty registrar is stationed at the Native 
Sons headquarters at 1044 Stockton St. 
to receive registrations. This registra- 
tion bureau will be open from 12 noon 
to 6 p. m. and from 7 in the evening 
to 9, until Feb. 15. It is of interest to 
those citizens who are about to register 
for the first time that the procedure is 
comparatively simple, in fact, simpler 
than signing a school class registration 
blank. The data required are name, 
place of birth, place of residence, occu- 
pation and party designation. No system 
of self government will continue success- 
fully nor the rights of citizens be ade- 
quately protected unless the citizens have 
sufficient public spirit to perform their 
own duties at the polls. Therefore, it is 
urged that all citizens should take ad- 
vantage of the facilities offered and re- 
gister immediately, as this registration is 
necessary in order to vote in the coming 
elections. 

• • 

DR. CHANG SPEAKS ON 
RUSSIAN THEATER 

In the only public lecture he gave 
during his brief stay in Honolulu on his 
way to England to lecture at the univer- 
sities, Dr. Pengchun Chang, former dir- 
ector of the Mei Lan Fang Company, 
spoke on the subject of Russian theater 
at the Academy of Arts recently. 

The Russian theater of the revolu- 
tion was one of stark realism, declared 
Dr. Chang, and there was dissatisfaction 
in its rank. Its leaders studied the act- 
ing technique of the Chinese. Lately, 
the Russian theater has come to use more 
gestures. It stresses the coordination of 
muscles and mind, and uses certain ac- 
tions to create an emotional pattern in 
the audience's mind. Dr. Chang exhibit- 
ed photographs of Russian and Chinese 
actors during the course of his lecture. 

• • 
BAKERSFIELD CHINESE 
HOLD ANNIVERSARY 

The Associated Chinese Club of Bak- 
ersfield will celebrate its anniversary with 
a dance featuring Monte Carlo night at 
the clubhouse at 1318£ 18th Street, on 
Saturday, Feb. 22, starting at 9 p. m. 
Entertainment and refreshments will be 
free, and the public is invited free of 
admission. 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



CHINATOWNIA 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



SEATTLE NEWS 

Feeling that since Mandarin is the offi- 
cial language of the Chinese Republic, 
it is the duty of all Chinese to learn it 
and help spread its use, Seattle Chinese 
have instituted a mandarin class in the 
curriculum now presented at the Chung 
Wah Chinese language school. 

Classes are conducted Wednesday and 
Friday evenings, 8 p. m. to 10:30 p. m., 
by Madame Liang, the wife of Chinese 
Vice-Consul R. S. Liang and Principal 
M. W. Wong of the Chinese school. 
Anyone interested may enroll, the only 
requirement being regular attendance. No 
fees are charged inasmuch as the teachers 
are donating their services, and the Chung 
Wah has sanctioned the free use of Chi- 
nese school facilities. 

Thus far, approximately 30 persons 
of all ages, and both sexes, are attending. 
It is also reported that numerous others 
will enroll as soon as their time permits. 



It's Scout Sunday this week, and the 
members of Chinese Troop 54 will have 
to dust off their uniforms, polish their 
shoes, and comb their hair before attend- 
ing en masse the services at the Chinese 
Baptist Church. The Troop is partici- 
pating in the afternoon program and 
proud fathers, mothers, and family will 
be on hand to applaud Junior's Thespian 
efforts. 



Seattle young men are sitting nervous- 
ly in front of their telephones this week, 
for the Chinese Girls' Club is holding its 
annual Tolo event this coming week, Feb. 
16, at the Horseshoe Inn on the Tacoma 
highway. Bids are out now, and it is 
rumored that many a secret romance will 
come to the surface. Miss Mollie Locke, 
U. of W. coed, is in charge of arrange- 



Seattle Chinese students were given a 
further boost this year when Samuel B. 
Wong, bacteriologist, was given an in- 
structorship at the University of Wash- 
ington. Mr. Wong, ex-Franklin high 
graduate, is completing his thesis for his 
P. H. D. degree this quarter. Aside 
from holding a master's degree at pre- 
sent, he is also a member of numerous 
campus science honoraries. He is the 
first Chinese ever to be awarded an m- 
structorship on the campus. 



Should some impudent young fellow 
rush up to you with a mimeographed 
sheet, and then gallop away snickering, 
he's not crazy, he's just one of the Young 

Patronize Our 



Recreation Commission 
Conducts Tournament 

Entries for the 7th annual kite tour- 
nament sponsored by the San Francisco 
City Recreation Commission will close 
on Feb. 29 at the Chinese Playground, 
according to Mr. Oliver Chang, director. 

There will be two classes for boys and 
girls: Junior, through thirteen years, and 
Senior, 14 to 17 years, with the events 
as follows: 1. Novelty of design, 2. 
Beauty of design, 3. Kite flying race. 

All kites entered and flown in the 
tournament must be made and flown by 
the children entering them. 



China club that is putting out a "scandal 
sheet" for local young people. These 
Chinese lads could "out-winchell" Win- 
chell if given half a chance. Anyhow, 
their gossip sheet keeps the ball rolling 
around town, and brings the pink to 
many a modest young lady and man's 
cheeks. 



Mr. Albert Wong Lam held open 
house, Sunday, Feb. 1, in honor of his 
brother, Herbert, who has returned after 
several years' study at the Poy Chien 
Boy's School in Canton China. Among 
those present were: Mrs. A. K. Wong; 
Misses Priscilla Hwang, Dorothy Luke, 
Helen Hong, Mary Hong; Messrs. 
Frank Nipp, Edwin Luke, Kaye Hong, 
Tom Hong, William Hong, and James 
Hong. 



Jue Fong, world-famous Chinese tenor, 
is pleasing Seattle audiences this week 
at the Rex Theatre. Local Chinese 
vaudeville-lovers say that Mr. Fong is 
as good as ever. 



See Me Before You Buy 

ARTHUR N. DICK 

REPRESENTING 

Plymouth Chrysler 

• 

Bigger Trade-in Allowance 

Low Finance Rate 

Phones: CH 1824 or PRos. 2400 

james w. McAllister, inc. 

Van Ness at Post San Francisco 



Advertisers — They Help to Mak.e This a Bigger and 



St. Mary's A. C. Launches 
Financial Campaign 

In an effort to raise an adequate sum 
with which to build a gymnasium, the St. 
Mary's athletic club will give a dramatic 
program of skits and a 3 -act comedy on 
Saturday evening, March 14. The pro- 
gram will be held in the auditorium of 
the Chinese Catholic Center, and general 
admission will be fifty cents. 

The club intends to convert the Catho- 
lic Center's auditorium into a full-size 
gymnasium, but to do that requires from 
#400 to #500. That is why, according 
to John Chinn, chairman, the club has 
to undertake a campaign to raise the 
amount. 

" We have more than a hundred boys 
in the club now and they are very active 
in taking part in the boxing lessons and 
the basketball practices," he said. "But 
in order to give our boys every benefit 
necessary for their physical development, 
we need a fully-equipped gym. We hope 
the parents of our members and all those 
interested in sports and who would like 
to see our boys get some good athletic 
training will help us realize our aims. 
They can do this by buying tickets to 
our coming show." 

The St. Mary's A. C. was organized 
two months ago. At present it has 
several American coaches who teach the 
members basketball and boxing regularly. 

• • 

Classes at Catholic Center 

Two new classes which were opened last 
week at the Catholic Chinese Social Cen- 
ter, Clay and Stockton Streets, bid fair 
to become popular with boys and young 
men. The first was a ballroom dancing 
class for beginners, with Mr- Zellors, as 
instructor, and Mrs. Gitmore as piano 
accompanist. Twenty young men attend- 
ed the opening of this class last Wed- 
nesday and waxed enthusiastic over their 
first lesson, although it lasted over two 
hours. 

The second class was the teaching of 
the fundamentals of tennis, with Mr. 
Silen as instructor. This class was started 
last Friday and proved an attraction for 
many youthful tennis enthusiasts. 

The dancing class will meet regularly 
every week on Wednesday evening and 
the tennis class on Friday evenings. Re- 
gistrations for a few more students are 
still open, it has been announced. 
Better Paper 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 5 



FASHIONS 



CLARA CHAN 



EAST INVADES THE WEST 

It is a known fact that fashion design- 
ers delve into the historical past in their 
search to present something new each 
season; but in this mere deliberate in- 
vention to appease the fashion conscious 
world for something new, we find that 
from time to time, the designers are in- 
fluenced or inspired by national cos- 
tumes. For instance, famous Parisian 
designers have successfully presented sub- 
tle derivative forms, such as the Russian 
tunic, bolero jacket, Dragoon helmets, 
Rennaissance robes, and many others. 
Occidental fancies in their turn capture 
the interest of Chinese women, but al- 
though modifications were accepted, the 
native characteristic garments remained 
inarticulate. 
CHINESE INFLUENCE— 

Fashion constantly changes, and a pop- 
ular mode seldom prevails more than two 
seasons. It is worthy of note, therefore, 
that the Chinese influence reaching its 
height in 1934 has never completely faded 
from the fashion picture. Most outstand- 
ing, perhaps, is the slit skirt, a direct 
adaptation of the Chinese long dress 
which was slit from the hem to the knee, 
a feature exemplifying chic two years 
ago among fashionable Chinese women. 
This feature became instanteously popu- 
lar in the Western world and overnight 
we found slits appearing in evening 
gowns, daytime dresses, and sport skirts. 
Although other modes have occupied 
our fancy since, active women of the 
sports and business worlds have never 
given up the slit skirts entirely because 
of their simplicity and practicality. 

Then there was the new rainbow of 
colors introduced by Schiaparelli in the 
Fall of 1934. She offered a "menu" of 
eight Chinese colors: three greens, name- 
ly, Yangtse, Vert-Chinois, and Celestial; 
Peiping (yellowish red), Gobi Gold 
(pure yellow), Cathay, (purplish blue) 
Ginger (brownish brick tone), oolong 
(soft orange) . 

To these new colors, the Color Card 
Association of United States, Inc., added 
Chinese Coral, Ming Gold, and Manchu, 
all sparkling tones. Interesting color 
harmonies as well as color dissonances 
found in ceremonial robes of ancient Chi- 
na also were sources of inspiration to the 
designer. Although the gamut of rich 
Rennaissance colors ascended in favor 
the past Winter, we are still delightfully 
impressed by some outfits in Chinese 
colors. 



Lien Fa Saw You 

Included in Miss Elena Tong's ward- 
robe is a forest green wool coat, with 
straight lines that fits nicely to her slen- 
der figure. This coat has large flared 
revers of brown beaver which is so popu- 
lar this season. Brown suede flat heel 
sandals, sport envelope purse of suede, 
heavy fabric gloves and a small brimmed 
velour hat that matches her coat perfect- 
ly are the accessories Miss Tong chooses 
when this good looking coat is worn. 

While window shopping one evening 
I noticed a Chinese girl admiring a chif- 
fon evening gown at a smart local shop. 
This young lady had on a beige crepe 
coat, full length, lavishly collared with 
lynx. I wish I had dared "ups" to her 
and asked her name. Undoubtedly, she 
must be an out-of-town visitor. Rude 
enough to be looking at her beautiful 
coat, trying to get all the details, I gather- 
ed her brown turban is of velvet, with 
high heeled shoes in brown suede. 

The lovely ermine collar, setting her 
black coat off one hundred percent, was 
designed to be worn as an ascot tie in 
the front or drawn back and hooked, to 
lend a more dressy appearance. Mrs. 
Frank H. Lee, the former Ella Chan, 
looked positively charming in this rich 
coat and a perky felt topper or "dunce 
cap" of black, ornamented with a tiny 
"silky brush" gayly colored. Her black 
imported suedes make her the picture of 
a well-dressed lady. 



RECENT ADAPTATIONS— 

In the past season, we were no doubt 
elated that frogs as fasteners were adopt- 
ed in the Western apparel, for where 
else can we find better designed and more 
cleverly made frog? than those made by 
the Chinese themselves. Another appro- 
priation by the Western coutouriers is 
the Chinese high collar. Little stand up 
collars prevail among the present high 
neckline. 

The latest Chinese influence in the Oc- 
cidental world of fashion is the coolie 
hat, and the hat with a que. One can 
go on endlessly in enumerating the many 
lines, colors, and styles ancient China 
as well as modern Chinese have contri- 
buted to the West, but from the inces- 
sant adaptation of Chinese styles, one 
may easily predict that the Chinese will 
continue to bestow upon the West im- 
pressions, ideas, and designs in the world 
of fashion. 



ART ASSOCIATION BANQUET 

The San Francisco Art Association 
gave their annual banquet on the evening 
of Feb. 9 at the Far East Restaurant. 
After the dinner, the members and their 
American friends spent an enjoyable eve- 
ning at the Chinese Mandarin Theater 
and at David Chun's home. 

• • 
NURSERY FOR CHINESE BABIES 

The Chinese Presbyterian Church of 
Oakland opened a nursery Monday for 
the Chinese babies of the community, 
taking in children from two to four years 
of age. The nursery, located at 267 8th 
Street and open from nine in the morn- 
ing till 3.30 in the afternoon, is limited 
to twenty. The children will be taken 
care of by trained nurses. 

• • 

Mr. and Mrs. Dong Fon of 1062A 
Washington St., San Francisco, became 
the parents of a daughter, born Feb. 1. 

• • 

Mr- and Mrs. Fong Sang of 14 Wet- 
more St., San Francisco, became the par- 
ents of a son, born Jan. 30. 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

• 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



Winding Up 

Sale in blaze 

of Values! 

MOORE -QUALITY 

SUITS 




• Many Suits from higher 
lines added to $21.50 Sale. 

• Worsteds, Cheviots, Twists; 
singles, doubles, pleat backs. 

• Broken lines, but practically 
every size represented. 

Sale Ends Saturday, Feb. 15 

MOORE'S 

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

840 Market 141 Kearny * 1450 B'way 

Opp. Emporium Near Sutter Oakland 

(^Chinese Salesman here: Edward Leong) 




COLDAY (Ed Leong) SEZ: 

THERE'S A STORY goin' 'round and 
'round that's finally come out here. It 
seems that Jack Benny (maestro extra- 
ordinary) meandered over to the Warner 
Bros, lot to pay his respects to Dick 
Powell. Powell in the course of 
conversation started to elaborate on his 
next picture. One thing led to another, 
and he then brought out his wardrobe 
to better illustrate his part in the various 
scenes. He showed Benny the three 
different sport ensembles the picture 
called for; one formal morning outfit; 
one single-breasted business suit; one 
double-breasted business suit; one tuxedo; 
one full dress suit; one riding habit: one 
full-cut camel's hair topcoat; one chester- 
field evening coat. He started to the 
closet for another load when Jack Benny 
chirped up with, "Say! Who the deuce 
wrote the story for this picture — Han 
Schaffner & Marx?" 

— •- 

AND WHILE we're on the subject of 
clothes it might be well to mention that 
plaids, plaids, and more plaids will steal 
the show in men's wear styles this Spring. 
Suits will show them, of course, but the 
big play will be in shirts, socks, ties, 
pajamas, and last but not least — shorts! 
Better play safe and wear your blinders 
when asking to see the new plaid shorts. 
I saw a pair recently and it was just 
like looking smack into a noonday sun. 
The loudest colors ever made by the hand 
of man ! Yes sir, men are going in for 
"hot stuff" this Spring! 
-•- 

MOORE'S have just gotten in some 
new sport coats styled with the new, 
comfortable "blouse-back." \\ c are 
showing them in black and white checks 
with a large light blue overplaid also 
brown and white checks with large 
chocolate overplaid. Boy oh boy, are 
they smart! 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Pag* 7 



CHINATOWNIA 



Allee, the Towntrotter, says: PORTLAND NEWS 



Let's go outta town! .... MLLE. YEN 
TSING SZE, attractive daughter of Chi- 
nese Ambassador to U. S. and a graduate 
of Wellesley College makes her Broad- 
way debut in "LADY PRECIOUS 
STREAM", play taken from old Orient- 
al love story .... dainty Miss ESTHER 
ENG (former S. F. girl) is one of the 
producers of the picture "HEART- 
ACHES" made in Los Angeles .... 
Miss WAI KIM FONG who came over 
from China not long ago, is playing the 
starring role .... BEAL WONG of Los 
Angeles is her lover (in the picture?) 
.... Mrs. FLORENCE CHAN, sister of 
KERN LOO will sail next week for 'round 
the world trip .... FRED K. WONG 
(former S. F. boy) now lives in Sacra- 
mento, appears to have set some sort of 
speed record — Saturday night he flew a 
plane to Reno to attend a party — early 
Sunday he flew out to Chinatown to 
swat a few games of tennis — he's a flying 
Chinaman! .... RUTH W AH YOU is 
still working in Stockton at the Weber 
Cafe (come up and see me sum-time!) 
.... Miss ELIZABETH NGAI, returned 
from China about four months ago, and 
ADA LOOK were in Stockton last Sun- 
day — chowing at the ON LOCK SAM 
Cafe .... Saint Valentine in Chinatown: 
CARENA SING is calling RAY LOWE 
'hubby' now .... CONNIE KING 
(formerly of Locke) is reported engaged 
to SANFORD CHAN— its a pretty dia- 
mond she's wearing .... that virile and 
dashy truck driver ED. 'Fagan' CHONG 
and pretty Miss ELIZABETH LEE are 
'that way' about each other .... VIO- 
LET YEE (from Watsonville) has 
FRANK LEE as her steady escort .... 
WALT LEE and JESSIE FUNG are 
aflame .... BENSON CHOY (Lowell) 
goes to Honolulu once a year to look for 
a girl friend! (latest request) Why don't 
you town-gals give him a break? .... 
A certain handsome chap explained to 
another, "So things didn't go round and 
round when you kissed your blind date?", 
the other answered, "No, she had a face 
that would stop a clock." Do you know 
that EDMUND JUNG is the only Chi- 
nese playing on the Stanford Universi- 
ty band .... the three KAN brothers, 
BILL, HENRY, and GEORGE, played 
last Sunday at FRENCH COURT .... 
FRANK YAM twisted his ankle in a 
basketball game last Sunday .... ALICE 
GINN CHONG of San Luis Obispo is 
a visitor in town .... that goes for 
JUNE LUM of Napa .... 

S-o-o until next week So long. 



The Winter Conference of the Oregon 
Girl Reserves was held in Salem, Oregon, 
through January 3 1 to February 2. The 
theme of the conference was "Under- 
standing". Members from the Chinese 
Girl Reserve group who attended were 
Isabelle Lee Hong, Nymphia Lam and 
Marjorie Chin. 



Portland will surrender to California 
one of the most colorful athletes and 
master on hair styles when Harding "Son- 
ny" Wong accepts an offer at Reno's 
Hair Designing Studio at Long Beach, 
California. 

Mr. Wong is remembered as the Jun- 
ior Tennis Champion of the Twenty Se- 
cond Annual Chinese Students' Alliance 
conference in Portland in 1929, and 
since then has held four different champ- 
ionship trophies in local tournament in 
the city. 

Climaxing this year's activities, he was 
presented by the Marinello School with 
a loving cup for the most outstanding 
model in a hair styling contest opened 
to shop operators in Oregon. 

Harding Wong's untiring efforts to- 
ward originality and perfection and his 
compatible personality will always be ad- 
mired by all his American and Chinese 
associates. 

• • 

COLUSA MAN SUICIDE 

Lee Kin Chek, fifty-nine year old Chi- 
nese of Colusa, California, committed 
suicide last week. It is believed by friends 
that Lee took his life on account of lin- 
gering illness and financial difficulties. 

• • 

FUNERAL HELD FOR 
HONOLULU CHINESE 

Funeral services were held recently in 
Honolulu for Philip Chin Wong, a well- 
known Honolulu business man who passed 
away in Hong Kong. His body was cre- 
mated and the remains brought back to 
the islands. 

Wong was one of the founders of the 
Hawaii Chinese Civic Association and 
the Chinese Athletic Club, having served 
as president of both organizations. He 
was also president of the Hawaii Chinese 
News. Always active in civic affairs of 
Honolulu, Wong served as committeman 
of the Chinese Y. M. C. A., of the Boy 
Scout Council, of the Social Service Bur- 
eau and of the Nuuanu Y. M. C. A. 

He is survived by his widow and two 
children, Andrew, University of Hawaii 
student, and Litheia, student at Punahou 
Academy. 



POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



In all periodicals there is a little space 
allotted to cute sayings by youngsters, 
but none for the 'Klever Kombacks' of 
young men and women, so here it is. 

Moe: "Gosh, you're looking sleepy. No 
girl should make you lose sleep!" 

Joe: "Maybe that's why I lose sleep: 
NO GIRL." 



In every one there is a suppressed de- 
sire (I don't mean person), something 
you want to do which circumstance pre- 
vents. 

Take for instance, this young lady Miss 
H. L. Her desire was to write her initials 
on the wet pavement. Now if she were 
a boy, her desire would have been ful- 
filled long ago. 



Allen S. has the urge to pick flowers 
from gardens, lawns or anywhere where 
anything is blossoming. Home owners, 
look out for him. 



It is bad enough to have to attend 
a church meeting called on a Saturday 
night. But it is worse to have to rush 
back from San Francisco to attend such 
a meeting — -only to find out when you 
get there, that there was no meeting and 
someone had misinformed her. 



Hoarding is a practice outlawed by the 
Government when it comes to keeping 
gold, but on clothes, etc., there is no 
such law. Consequently, one is more apt 
to keep and wear old clothes. One young 
lady wore a skirt for five years, all was 
well until she stooped the other day 
then — (blush) moral: Don't expect too 
much. 

J. W., another one of those puzzle 
addicts strained himself, I mean his 
brains (?) and received a severe head- 
ache. One should estimate one's capacity. 



If you or your friends have any sup- 
pressed desire and also when you hear 
a Klever Komback, will you please send 
it in? (No contributions will be printed 
unless the writer's name and address is 
on it.) 



r»g» 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 14, 1934 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, |2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, £2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 



STAFF 



CHING WAH LEE. 

WILLIAM HOY 

FRED GEORGE WOO 

CLARA CHAN 

ETHEL LUM 



Associate Editor 

_Associate Editor 
Sports 



Fashi< 



ROBERT G. POON 



-Community Welfare 
Circulation 



CORRESPONDENTS AND REPRESENTATIVES 

Los Angeles William Cot, Elsie Lee 

Oakland Hector Eng, Ernest Loo 

Portland Eva Moe, Edgar Lee 

Seattle Eugene Wong, Edwin Luke 

Watsonville, Vicinity Iris Wong 



EFFICIENCY PLUS 

As the scribe sank her teeth into those delightrul 
morsels commonly called oatmeal cookies, she was ob- 
livious to everything except the delicious aroma and fla- 
vor. However, besides being able to concoct delicious 
tidbits, Miss Barbara Quon of Los Angeles has served 
her high school well. 

Here are some of her accomplishments: 

Senior Class A Historian of the Ephbian, the highest 
honor society for students at high school, member of 
the California Scholastic Federation, secretary of the 
student body, secretary of the Girls' League, vice-pres- 
ident of the Honor Society, editor-in-chief of the 
school publication, secretary of the Senior B. Class, and 
corresponding secretary of the Secretarial Efficiency 
Club. 

She also won highest honors in shorthand, being the 
first student at Jefferson High to pass a 160-word test. 
Last year she participated in a sectional shorthand 
contest and won first place, winning a medal. Later 
she won a second place medal in a Southern California 
contest, besides winning two certificates. 

Barbara is attending the Los Angeles Junior College, 
and upon graduating hopes to enroll at Scripps College. 
Such a deserving personality is truly an example for 
the students of today. 

• 

Learning is like raising a monument; if I stop with 

this basket of earth, it is my fault. It is like throwing 
earth on the ground; one basket at a time, yet I advance. 

— Confucius. 



JAPANESE EDUCATOR DENIES "INVASION" 

Declaring that Japan has not "invaded" North China 
in his lecture to the San Francisco Commonwealth 
Club last week, Dr. Yamato Ichihashi, educator, failed 
to enlighten the audience as to the underlying cause 
of Japan's policy toward China. 

Dr. Ichihashi, who is touring the United States, said 
in part, regarding Japan's situation, "Japan proper is 
smaller than California, and lacks natural resources, 
and has to support a population of 70,000,000. Her 
colonies, Formosa and Korea, are no better off in 
these respects." 

Is it to be taken for granted that simply because 
Japan is overpopulated and lacking in natural resources, 
she is "justified" in expanding by aggression at China's 
expense? 

He further stated, "Japan faces domestic problems 
that are all embracing in character and difficult of 
solution. She did not escape the world-wide economic 
chaos in the postwar period, and when the crash came 
she was vitally affected by it. Her industry and her 
agriculture were dislocated and her unemployment 
multiplied." 

We failed to see any reason why Japan's situation 
have any bearing on China. Not only the Japanese, 
but the entire world felt the depression. However, 
apparently her solution to her domestic troubles and 
unemployment lies upon furnishing able-bodied men 
in the trenches and women and older folks in the 
factories. 

Dr. Ichihashi stated that the Japanese aspire to 
improve their standard of living and to obtain national 
security. Does he mean that invasions of China will 
enable them to attain their objective? Or does he 
mean that Japan aspires to be the world's ranking 
power by land-grabbing? 

"In the midst of this confusion the Manchurian 
incident took place. Only a coalition form of govern- 
ment in Japan at the time saved the day," he declared. 

Well do we know, and the world knows, what hap- 
pened. Any explanations on the part of the Japanese 
would be utterly contrary to the real truth. 

Dr. Ichihashi's statement that Japan has not invaded 
North China is lacking in sincerity. It is nothing more 
than a simple statement and he failed to explain fully, 
although the explaining would be too difficult a task 
to undertake. As best as can be interpreted it is some- 
what of a hypocritical statement. F. G. W. 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



f— 9 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



Remember When? 



CERAMIC ART 



Remember when there were no barber 
poles in Chinatown? When in their 
stead the shops displayed a red and green 
stand holding a basin — as a symbol or 
their tonsorial trade? 

The Chinese barber did not really cut 
hair, they shaved. He starts by wrap- 
ping a hot towel over the customer's 
head. Then he would shave the forehead 
a full inch beyond the hair line, since 
all Chinese desired to be "high brows". 
Similarly the sides and back are shaved 
an inch back to give that "cool" feeling. 
In so doing, he "accidentally" removes 
a few of the long strands — to be recovered 
later and sold at a high price to the 
troupe makers. 

Next, the eyebrows and what little 
beard and whiskers on the customer are 
given a trimming. This is followed by 
a shaving of the entire face "to remove 
the fuzz lest one looked like a foreigner". 
Then the ears, and sometimes the nostrils, 
are given an elaborate cleaning — a de- 
lightful process which all customers en- 
joy. This is followed by a mild massage 
from behind the ears to the back of the 
neck. 

In braiding the ques a black silk cord 
is wound around the hair for half an 
inch just where the braiding starts. The 
rest of the cord is braided into the ques 
to terminate as a tassel. Dignified schol- 
ars have tightly braided inconspicuous 
ques, hanging straight down the back. 
Elderly men often add a switch. Working 
men coil it around their heads. The 
town sport had a loosely braided que 
which he hangs in front of him, some- 
times necklace fashion. And with the 
passing of a fair dame, will he twirl his 
snaky "whip". 

The ques were imposed on the Chinese 
as a sign of subjugation to the horse 
loving Manchus. It is not a sign of 
degradation, for a large group of exiled 
Chinese were not permitted to wear ques. 
The ques were formally abolished shortly 
after the establishment of the Republic. 
It is safe to say that ninety-nine percent 
of today's present day Chinese over forty 
years of age, had ques. Only among the 
Yellow Race is it possible for the men 
to have ques about a yard in length. 
The longest hair the males of the white 
race can raise is about half that length; 
the Negroes, half again. 



(XI) How To Study Glaze on Chinese 
Ceramics. 

The extent with which vessels are cov- 
ered with glaze often supply important 
clues to the collectors. For this study, 
we may divide the vessel into three 
areas — the inside surface, the outside 
surface from mouth to foot rim, and the 
base or areas inside the hollow base. 

These three surfaces may or may not 
be glazed, or may be only partially glazed. 
The glazes applied to these three areas 
may not be the same. For example, 
many Sung "monochromes" have a diff- 
erent colored glaze inside the hollow base, 
and the interiors of many Ch'ien Lung 
vessels are white where the outside is 
colored, and colored where the outside 
is white-grounded. 

Some of the cheaper pottery vessels 
are glazed on the inside surface only, 
and they often stop short of the top in 
the interest of economy. Such glazes 
are invariably thinly applied with a brush. 
Sometimes, the entire interior is glazed, 
and this is generally done by pouring 
some glazing fluid into the vessel, swish- 
ing it around and pouring it out again, 
rotating the vessel as the pouring is in 
progress. 

It is interesting to note here that many 
Han Dynasty vessels are glazed on the 
inside if the mouth rim flares outward, 
but unglazed, if the mouth curved in- 
ward, as in the vase of the dipper. There 
are, of course, many exceptions. On 
plates and bowls, where a large disc is 
found in the inside bottom, the Sung 
stacking technique is suggested; but this 
practice is carried through to the begin- 
ning of the Ming Dynasty, and many 
provincial factories still adopt this method. 

Concerning the outside surface (which, 
in the case of plates and bowls, is really 
the under side of the wares), if the entire 
surface is not glazed, we should note to 
what extent the glaze fall short of the 
base. The Han glazes come to the very 
edge of the base, but many T'ang glazes 
stop just a little more than halfway down 



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the outside surface. We must regard 
this unusual practice not merely as a 
case of avoiding adhesion only, but as 
an expression of a taste for giving an 
"unfinished" aspect to pottery — some- 
what as many modern sculptors leave a 
part of the base unfinished in order to 
enhance their work. The Sung and 
Yuan glazes reach further down, while 
the Ming and Ching wares are generally 
completely covered. Like a woman's 
skirt, its length increases with the ap- 
proach of maturity. 

The outside surface may have biscuit 
reserves for moulded decorations, or, in 
the case of figurines, for the hands, feet, 
and faces, and so are not really complete- 
ly glazed. If the vessel should include 
pierced work, we should note whether 
these are true openings, or whether they 
have been filled with glaze (a Ch'ien 
Lung innovation). We should note whe- 
ther the mouth rim and foot rim are 
glazed — it is seldom that both are so 
covered. 

As to the "bottom" surface, for vessels 
having flat bases, if the ware is fired in 
an inverted position, the base is generally 
glazed, but if fired in an upright posi- 
tion, unglazed. With the hollow base, 
the entire interior may be glazed, but 
more often, the glaze stops short of the 
foot rim. Again, the bottom surface may 
include a biscuit disc or a stacking ring, 
and this ring may either be embedded 
inside the glazed bottom or it may serve 
as a margin between the wall of the foot 
and the glazed bottom. Of great import- 
ance is the way the glaze terminate*, 
(especially since a given vessel may have 
as many as eight boundaries, as above 
described) — is it regular, wavy, or irregu- 
lar with runs, sharp angles, and brush 
strokes? 

In my last article I neglected to men- 
tion that of the vessels having built- 
bases with flat bottoms, we must note 
whether it is really solid or whether it 
is hollowed from within, communicating 
with the inside of the vessel. 

Of vessels having the hollow base, we 
should again note whether the footrim 
is rounded, beaded, grooved, bevelled, or 
flat, and we must also determine whether 
this is the shape it has at the time it 
left the kiln or whether it has been 
grounded afterward. 

Erratum: In Article X, fourth para- 
graph of Ceramic Art, "Lokapita" 
should read "Lokapala". 



Copyrighted, 1936, by Chingwah Lee 



Page 10 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 14, T936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



CATHOLIC CENTER 
GIVES REPORT OF 
YEAR'S WORK 

By William Hoy 

Last week the community's only Catho- 
lic educational and social welfare institu- 
tion made known the complete record 
of its manifold activities for the twelve 
months ending December 31, 1935. 
Through the maze of statistics and fin- 
ancial figures a few highlights of the 
past year's work emerged of which the 
following are indicative: 

The native language school had a 44 
per cent increase in enrollment over the 
previous year — 

The English day school boosted its en- 
rollment 6 per cent as compared with 
the previous year — 

Two new boys' organizations were form- 
ed during the latter part of the year, 
and began with a total membership of 
over a hundred boys — 

A special class for girls and women 
was also started during the latter part of 
the year, and which in December had 
some 40 members — 



We have every reason to look back 
on 1935 as a banner year for our school 
and social center," said Father George 
Johnson, C. S. P., its director. He added, 
"Never were the people of Chinatown 
or of San Francisco more conscious of 
our continued activities in carrying out 
the purposes of our organization. From 
both quarters we have received acclaim 
and in the eyes of all have more than 
justified our existence." 

The report goes on to point out the 
Center's various fields of activities and 
the progress made during the period cited. 

Education: The English day school 
functions as a complete grammar school 
and gives diplomas to its graduates upon 
their completion of its eighth grade, 
which enable them to proceed to the high 
school grades. In addition to the regular 
eight grades, there is also a Special Class 
for boys above 10 years of age who have 
recently come from China and who are 
too advanced in age to begin their Amer- 
ican education from the first grade. In 
this class intelligence and ability to learn 
is the yardstick in making promotions. 
If a pupil is sufficiently intelligent and 
industrious he may be able to reach 
the regular sixth grade after a year's 




St. Mary's Catholic School and Social 
Center. The building houses 9 class- 



rooms, 2 clubroon^, a chapel, convent, 
outdoor playground, and an auditorium. 



study in the Special Class. If not, it 
will take a longer time, but in no in- 
stance does it take more than one and 
one-half years for the average student. 

The day school at the end of 1935 had 
an enrollment of 370 pupils, as compared 
with 350 during 1934. They are housed 
in 9 classrooms and their education is 
entrusted to 8 nuns whose life-work is 
the education of the young. These nuns 
belong to the order of Sisters of St. Jo- 
seph, whose motherhouse is in Orange, 
California. Since the beginning of the 
school in 1921 these Sisters have been 
teaching here. They have their own 
convent in a large wing of the school 
where they live and work. A lay Chinese 
teacher is in charge of the Special Class. 

Once a year the School awards schol- 
arships to a graduate which entitles him 
to attend the Sacred Heart high school 
for 4 years. 

The Chinese language school had an 
enrollment of 360 pupils at the end of 
1935, as compared with 250 in the pre- 
vious year. According to recent tabu- 
lations of the number of pupils in the 
community's 9 schools, this means that 1 
out of every five attends St. Mary's. 
With a gain of more than a hun- 
dred students in twelve months two 
more teachers were secured, which 
brings the number up to nine. Be- 
side teaching the regular courses 
as obtained in other language 
schools in the community, the St. 
Mary's Chinese school has a spe- 
cial Chinese music class which at- 
tempts to educate the pupils to 
know their national music and to 
play native instruments, notably 
the dulcimer (yang k'am). This 
class is taught once a week, on Sat- 
urday mornings. 

Social Service: A full time so- 
cial service worker, Mrs. William 
M. Stafford, is in charge of this 
department, created in 1929. Sta- 
tistics for this department's work 
for the year were given as follows: 
Fully 600 children's garments, 
secured through the Catholic Par- 
ent-Teacher's Association, were dis- 
tributed. Individuals for whom full- 
time work were secured totaled 1 20, 
a two per cent increase over 1934. 
Visits made to homes of the sick 
and needy totaled 3,000; while the 
number of individuals given spe- 
-cial assistance or relief directly 
through this department was 30. 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 11 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY 



NEUTRALITY 

During the next few weeks an import- 
ant public question which will be as much 
talked about as the next presidential 
election will be the probable fate of he 
new neutrality bills now pending in Con- 
gress. On February 29 the temporary 
U. S. neutrality resolution of August 31, 
1935, will have expired. Will a per- 
manent neutrality policy be enacted at 
that time? Or will the present resolution 
be extended another year? Talk is rife 
in Washington that the plan for a perm- 
anent neutrality policy will be abandoned 
for the time being and that an extension 
of time for the present policy is quite 
probable. The outcome will have its 
effect both on the present European and 
Far Eastern situations. 

At any rate, there are several books 
recently published which seek to clarify 
the economic and legal sides of the neu- 
trality problem. Professor Charles Sey- 
mour of Yale, in his American Neutral- 
ity (Yale University Press, $2) confines 
his inquiry to the period of the World 
War. Professor Seymour is of the opin- 
ion that the whole question of American 
neutrality is the question of economic 
rights. To treat the matter as simply 
one of national rights, however, hardly 
makes legislative neutrality justifiable, 
for a neutral nation, during a time of war 
between other countries, can declare 
many rights which belligerent nations 
must respect, when these so called rights 
are backed up by military power. 

In Can We Be Neutral?, by Allen 
Dulles and Hamilton Fish Armstrong, 
(Harpers, #1.50) the accepted notion 
that neutrality is "a clearly defined sta- 
tus" in international law is considered 
a fallacy. To these two authors neutral- 
ity is a "policy which a country at peace 
adopts toward countries at war," and that, 
being a policy it is not immutable but 
may be varied and altered to meet each 
and every contingency. They advocate 
a policy, rather than "rights" as the 
determining factor in setting up a neu- 
trality program. But policy and rights 
are somehow inseparable, for policy is 
dictated by national interests, which in 
turn imply recognition of rights — such 
as that much debated question of the 
"freedom of the seas." 



In their efforts to discover a solution 
for this confused issue, the authors 
seemingly contradicted themselves. In 
framing a neutrality policy "the course 
which we choose should depend upon our 
own best interest," but the United States 
has a "continuing responsibility" to work 
for peace. It is hard to see how these 
aims could be reconciled to each other. 
A neutrality policy based on national 
self-interest would mean to get the most 
profits out of war without getting the 
country embroiled with the belligerents. 
Under such a policy no nation to-day 
would be ambitious to work for inter- 
national peace. 

The third book is the first of a four- 
volume series under the imprint of the 
Columbia University Press. Neutrality: 
Its History, Economics and Law. Vol. 1 
The Origins, by Philip Jessup and Fran- 
cis Deak, (#3.75) is intended to give 
"a clearer understanding of the funda- 
mentals upon which the law of neutral 
rights and duties has been based and of 
the factors — largely economic — which 
have conditioned its development." The 
present volume traces its history down to 
the middle of the eighteenth century. 

Throughout the early history of the 
neutrality law the element of logic played 
only an insignificant part. Although in 
the seventeenth century the legal status 
of neutrality was well-known, yet the op- 
eration of the law, in most instances, was 
motivated by economic self-interest and 
political convenience. It operates in prac- 
tically the same fashion today. 

Even in those days "there was prac- 
tically no commerce which neutrals could 
carry on, or attempt to carry on, despite 
belligerent interference." 

Professor Jessup, one of the authors 
of the foregoing volume and professor 
of International Law at Columbia, ex- 
pressed his skepticism of all the neutrality 
laws which have been enacted in this 
country. He believes with the late Oliver 
Wendell Holmes that "a page of history 
is worth a volume of logic." Yet, "des- 
pite this clear truth, governments sol- 
emnly persist in arguing about the inter- 
national law of neutrality on the basis 
of logical deductions from non-existent 
premises." 

"Neutrals have always contended that 
they have a right to carry on their nor- 
mal trade, subject to certain belligerent 
rights such as thar of establishing a 



blockade or of intercepting contraband. 
In practice, neutrals have reached out 
for abnormal, war-boom trade." 

Professor Jessup illustrates the utter 
futility of neutrality law by stating that 
"it has been and remains just as easy 
to quarrel over belligerent interferences 
with neutral cargoes of foodstuffs or oil 
or cotton as over cargoes of cartridges 
and machine guns." To him "there was 
no logic in the recent position of the 
United States embargoing as 'implements 
of war' airplane engines, 'military' arm- 
ored vehicles and tanks, while permitting 
the export to Italy of tractors and trucks." 

Professor Jessup believes that the var- 
ious problems arising out of a neutrality 
law "cannot be solved by domestic legis- 
lation but depend upon international 
agreement. Regardless of the fate of 
the administration neutrality bills before 
Congress, it is significant that they re- 
serve and reaffirm rights of the U. S. 
"under international law as it existed 
prior to August 1, 1914." This without 
any attempt to secure international agree- 
ment on those rights." 

He concludes wih the observation that 
"a neutrality policy designed to secure 
peace would be based on international 
agreements by which neutrals would 
surrender the right to trade with belli- 
gerents but would establish a common 
neutral front for the protection of genu- 
ine neutral trade." 

It is more than probable that the pre- 
sent neutrality resolution of the United 
States will be extended for a time when 
it expires on February 29. If so, it 
would be interesting to contemplate what 
the effect of such a policy would have in 
the event the present critical Far Eastern 
situation should resolve into a state of 
military struggles between Japan and 
Russia over the question of Outer Mon- 
golia, or between Japan and China over 
North China, or a war in which Russia 
and China both oppose Japan. Of the 
three countries Russia is perhaps the only 
one with adequate food supply and re- 
sources to manufacture ammunitions at 
home. Japan must export food and raw 
materials for firearms; while China de- 
pends entirely on Italy, Britain and the 
United States for her implements of war. 
In such an event, would the U. S. staunch- 
ly stand by its neutral policy, refusing to 
sell "implements of war" and losing the 
chance of an industrial boom? 

History will furnish the right answer. 



Page 12 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo ■ 



Chinese Baseball 
Training League 

An All-Chinese Spring Training Lea- 
gue was recently inaugurated in Honolu- 
lu, with four teams competing. This 
league is conducted for the purpose of 
uncovering material for the Chinese 
nine in the Hawaii League, the most 
promising players to receive tryouts. 
Championship team and the individual 
stars will receive worthwhile prizes for 
awards. 

The four teams in the league are the 
Chungshans, Ho Min, Hawaiian Aquar- 
ium and the James Chong Clothiers. 
Chungshans have for their manager Al- 
win K. Moon and captain Wang Lefty 
Chow; Ho Min, T. F. Farm and William 
Chai; Hawaiian Aquarium, Ruddy F. 
Tong and Charlie Kaulukukui; and the 
Clothiers, James Chong and Edwin Tarn, 
who was one of the members of the All- 
Hawaii team which toured the States last 
year. 

• • 

CHINESE SCORE P. A. A. TRIUMPH 
Shangtai's 130-lb. basketball team 
scored a 41-32 victory over the Maxwells 
in its initial P. A. A. engagement at 
Kezar Pavilion last Sunday afternoon. 
With Allen Lee Po, Murphy Qu«n and 
John Wong carrying the attack, the Chi- 
nese five's win was decisively scored. 
Half-time tally favored the winners 21-12. 
The Troop Three Juniors lost their 
opener to the Lowell Ramblers in the 
120-lb. division, by a score of 37-25. 
Fred Wong was the J. V. main stalwart. 

Also playing last Sunday was Eddie 
Leong, a Chinese boy who pls.ys on the 
University of California's 30's in the 
P. A. A. 

• • 
CHINESE BOY MAKES ALL-CITY 

Doc Wong, the stellar guard of the 
Lowa Athletic Club basketball team, was 
elected All-City guard in high school 
competition. Wong was captain of his 
Lincoln High team, as well as one of 
the greatest guards who ever performed 
on Lincoln's fives. 



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Chi-Formans Shade 
National Quintet 

Overwhelming their opponents in the 
second half after trailing throughout the 
entire first canto, the Chi-Fornians hand- 
ed the National five a 50-34 beating at 
French Court last Sunday evening before 
a large crowd. 

Opening with a rush, the Nationals 
piled up a commanding lead at various 
stages. As the first quarter ended, they 
led 19-13. However, the Chi-Fornians 
gradually crept up on their rivals and at 
half, trailed by but one point, 24-23. 

Bill Kan tied the score at 24 all with 
a free throw at the opening of the se- 
cond half. From then on, the Chi-Forn- 
ians forged ahead and were never over- 
taken. With 16 points, Al Park Lee, for 
the winners, led in individual scoring 
for the evening, followed by Henry 
Whoe and Dave Chinn with eight and 
seven. Captain Frank Choye and Fran- 
cis Mark exhibited strong defensive per- 
formances. 

For the Nationals, Walter Lee and 
Victor Wong were the main threats, tank- 
ing twelve and eleven points respectively, 
while Bing Chin also turned in a good 
game. 

In the preliminary, the Troop Three 
Scout Juniors obtained partial revenge 
for the defeat the Chan Yings inflicted 
on the Scout 110's two years ago, by 
scoring a one-point victory over them. 
Final count was 25-24. Charles Louie 
starred for Chan Ying, while for the 
Juniors, Al Young, Fred Wong, and Pe- 
ter Chong were outstanding. 
• • 

Shangtai's hoop team went down to 
a surprise defeat at the hands of Tay- 
Holbrook at Francisco Court Monday, 
29-28, in a City Recreation League tilt. 
Allen Lee Po, George Lee and Charles 
Hing were the mainstays for the Chinese 
five. 



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Wa Sung Baseball Calls 
For Candidates 

Again succumbing to the lure of 
America's greatest pastime after a lengthy 
lay-off, Wa Sung Club of Oakland will 
attempt to secure the Auditorium Field 
for Sunday morning in order to begin 
anew the battle for coveted positions. 

Due to pressing business, Al Hue will 
not coach the team this year. Pending 
an election, Al Bowen will take charge. 
Among the first to sign up were: George 
Bowen, Joe Lee, Al Bowen, Gerald Chan, 
Hector Eng, Frank Dun, Glenn Lym, 
Robert Chow and Ed Hing. Other vet- 
erans expected to return are Allie Wong, 
Tom Hing, Key Chinn, Ralph Lieu, 
Sung Wong and Art Chinn. 

San Franciscans who would like to 
play for Wa Sung are urged to cross the 
bay and try out for the team, or com- 
municate with Gerald Chan, 526 8th 
St., Oakland. 

• • 
SEATTLE STUDENTS WIN 

The Seattle Chinese Students hoop 
team concluded its season at the Garfield 
section of the Class B City League with 
a decisive 54-27 win over the S. J. A. C. 
Fraternity five. The win boosted the 
students' record to 8 wins against two 
defeats, and cinched second place for 
them. However, no rest is foreseen for 
the collegiate squad as numerous post- 
season matches await them. 

• • 
"Y" 100's DECISIVELY 
BEATS JAPANESE 

With Robert Lum, flashy and tricky 
forward, scoring 26 points, the Chinese 
Y. M. C. A. 100-lb. cagers defeated the 
Japanese "Y" by a score of 39-4 last 
Saturday at the "Y" gym in a practice 
game. 

Lum, with able help from Joseph Chin 
and Johnson Lee, completely outclassed 
the Nippon five. Joseph Jung, Chew 
Young, Jan Lee and Bill Mar also played 
a good game. By virtue of this decisive 
win, the Chinese hundred pounders 
proved themselves dangerous contenders 
for the Junior Athletic Federation 
tournament championship. 

• • 

Mr. and Mrs. Lung Shung Gin of 
823 Grant Ave.. San Francisco, became 
the parents of a son on Jan. 23. 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 13 




Washington Challenges 

University of Washington's Chinese 
Students' Club would like to schedule a 
basketball contest with a San Francisco 
Chinese club on Mar. 22, on a guarantee 
basis for traveling expenses, according to 
word received from its captain, Edwin 
Luke. For further information, please 
communicate with the sports department 
of the Chinese Digest or write to 176 
26th Avenue, Seattle, Washington. 

The Chinese have had a successful 
season. So far, its team has won 22 
games and lost 9, competing in several 
leagues. The Washington lads are 
champions of the Pacific Northwest Chi- 
nese, runner-up in the City League "B" 
division and the University of Washing- 
ton intramural, and semi-finalists in the 
Y. M. C. A. tournament. They welcome 
one or two games here if possible, during 
their spring vacation. 

• • 
SHANGTAI AND SCOUTS IN P.A.A. 

Following are the members of the 
Shangtai 130's and the Troop Three 
Scout 120's which are entered in the light- 
weight P. A. A. basketball tournament: 

Shangtai: Murphy Bill Quon, Allen 
Lee Po, Thomas Bow, Chauncey Yip, 
Frank Chan, Richard Wong, Faye Lowe, 
John Wong, Jack Fong and Will Lowe. 

Troop Three: Fred Wong, Charles 
Lowe, Teddy Moy, Albert Young, Pe:er 
Chong, Herbert Lee, Lawrence Joe and 
Henry Kan. 

• • 

STANFORD BEATS SAN 
JOSE CHINESE 

University of Stanford's Chinese Club 
basketballers defeated the San Jose Chi- 
nese Club 27-25 in a recent game that 
took an extra three-minute period to de- 
cide the final count. At the end of the 
regulation time the tally was knotted 
at 23 all. Richard Tarn and Edmund 
Jung starred for the winners, while Har- 
ry Lee of San Jose was high-scorer of 
the contest with nineteen points. 

• • 
CHESSMEN, ATTENTION! 

Entries for the Chinese Y. M. C. A. 
Chinese chess tournament will close to- 
night (Friday). The tournament will 
be held in the main lobby Saturday at 
6:30 p. m. Public is invited. 



SPORTS SHORTS 

One of the veterans who greeted the 
Oakland Technical High School's base- 
ball coach's call for candidates was Allie 
Wong, letterman and centerfielder. Allie 
is small, but dynamic and fast, and a 
hard hitter. He also plays for the Wa 
Sung nine. 



Among the stars of the Young Chi- 
nese Club's lightweight quintet are Wal- 
lace Wong, Al Chan and Ray Yip. 



Rumors are persisting that the Kung 
An Social Club will undertake to spon- 
sor a Marathon Race in Chinatown early 
in the spring. And we hear that Thom- 
as Tong, athletic manager of Cathay, is 
studying the situation over in regards 
to a Softball league. 



Reliable sources have it that the Oak- 
land Wa Sung Baseball team is getting 
ready to practice for the coming cam- 
paign. 



Lowa A. C. of Los Angeles, playing 
for the Championship of the city basket- 
ball league, lost to the Bank of America 
quintet last week by a score of 40-28. One 
of the greatest crowds in the league's 
history witnessed the battle, some six 
hundred persons being present. 



Shangtai's hoop team scored a 53-51 
victory over Polytechnic Evening High 
School in a practice game last week. 
Allen Lee Po with 20 points and Fred 
Gok and Charles Hing with ten each 
were high scorers for the winners. 



Under the coaching of Al Young, the 
Scouts 90 pounders recently won the De- 
cathlon basketball tourney. 

Now that the days are getting longer 
and the nights shorter, tennis will be 
holding sway before many weeks are over. 
Fans for this sport will be hearing again 
the plinks and plunks of the rackets. 



Track season is coming around, with 
plenty of young fellows already starting 
practice, doing their daily (or occasion- 
al) grind at the old Golden Gate Stadium. 
Several Chinese lads have been seen 
there, training for their favorite events. 



Several basketball fans have remarked 
that Gerald Leong has been playing far 
below his form for the past few weeks. 



Johnny Wong and Steve Leong helped 
Galileo's 130's swamp the Balboa light- 
weights last week in an A. A. A. contest 
at Kezar, 32-8. 



In a J. A. F. basketball contest, the 
Tigers defeated the Bulldogs, both Chi- 
nese Y. M. C. A. 80-lb. teams, 26-14. 
The Tigers, two years Decathlon Champs, 
proved too experienced for the Bulldogs. 
Henry Sing Wong and Frank Yim were 
the Tiger's stars, while George Bow and 
Harry Chin were outstanding for the 
Bulldogs. 



Chinese "Y" 145-!b. cage five lost a 
hard-fought practice tilt to Trie Allies, 
by a count of 27-22. For the losers, 
Henry Kan and Frank Wong led the 
scoring attack, while Ben Lee, Bing Chin 
and Don Lee also performed well. 



With Fred Hong Wong scoring seven 
for high point honors, the Poly High 
cagers scored their first A. A. A. win of 
the year, defeating Mission Wednesday 
at Kezar, 25-17. 



The combination of Robert Lum and 
Joseph Chin proved too much for the 
Rough Riders, and as a result, the Chi- 
nese Y. M. C. A. 100-lb. cage team 
easily scored its first victory in a J. A. F. 
contest, 31-18. Lum was high-point 
with 18 digits. Under Leland Crichton, 
"Y" physical director, the team has done 
a good job so far, and with a little more 
experience, should go a long way in the 
casaba world. On Feb. 18 the team 
meets the Troop Three hundreds in an- 
other J. A. F. tilt, at S. F .B. C. court. 

• • 
POLICEMEN'S BALL 

To those who protect our lives and 
property we owe an immeasurable amount 
of gratitude. When they fall in line of 
duty, they have given their all, and 
leave behind those who are dependent 
on them. 

Can we not contribute our mite through 
the Annual Concert and Ball for the 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association 
of the Police Department? It will be 
held on Feb. 15, at the Civic Auditorium, 
Grove and Larkin Streets, Admission #1. 

• • 

EXPORT 
and 

WHOLESALE 
All Makes 

TYPEWRITERS 

• 

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Adding Machine Co. 

17 Second Street Slitter 6670 




Page 14 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CATHOLIC CENTER GIVES 
REPORT OF YEAR'S WORK 

(Continued from Page 10) 
Hospitalization was secured for 35 per- 
sons. 

The social service worker is also in 
charge of the English school's cafeteria, 
where hot noon-day meals consisting of 
meat, vegetables, bread, and milk or 
chocolate are served to some 40 to 50 
pupils each day at the cost of only five 
cents. Operating 5 days per week for 
44 weeks last year the cafeteria served 
5,500 meals. In addition, free milk is 
provided for approximately 25 under- 
nourished children every morning during 
school terms. 

A Chinese Conference of the St. Vin- 
cent de Paul Society (lay Catholic charity 
organization) supplements the work of 
the social service department. For the 
twelve months ending Sept. 30, 1935, 
this conference made 355 visits to Chinese 
in hospitals, institutions, and homes; 
gave special assistance to 23 individuals, 
and distributed 200 items of reading 
matter. 

Religious: -.Conversions to the Catholic 
faith during the year totaled 74, an in- 
crease of only 2 baptisms over the pre- 
vious year. However, the number of 
adults baptized in 1935 — forty-one — far 
exceeded those baptized in 1934, which 
was eighteen. During 1935 the number 
of children baptized was 30, whereas in 
1934 it was 54. Last year 3 individuals 
were baptized when in danger of death. 

Communions given totaled 8,000, while 
Confirmations were administered to 62. 
Five Catholic marriages were performed. 

Seven Catholics died during the year, 
4 adults and 3 children. 

Organizations: _.Nine organizations 
carry on three various welfare and group 
work of the Social Center. Of these, 
one, the Auxiliary, is composed of Ameri- 
cans interested in the missionary work 
of the Mission and who aid in carrying 
out a part of its program. The other 



groups are composed of Catholics and 
their non-Catholic friends. Five of these, 
the Mission Society, the St. Vincent de 
Paul Conference, the Catholic Chinese 
Y. M. A., the Mothers' Club, and the 
Catholic Daughters of America, were 
organized prior to 1935. 

During the year three new groups were 
organized. The Sewing Club was started 
in August under the guidance of two 
experts in needlecraft, Mother St. Rosa 
and Mrs. Mary Gong. A Boy Scout 
Troop was formed in September, with 
28 charter members. In December, a 
St. Mary's Athletic Club was organized 
with a charter membership of 90 boys 
and young men. 

Of the other groups, all of them ac- 
tively carried on their programs and main- 
tained their steady membership, with the 
exception of the Catholic Daughters. 
This group was started in 1934 with a 
charter membership, both seniors and 
juniors, of 51. During 1935 its total 
membership increased to 69. 

Finance: A sum total of $14,000 was 
expended in 1935 for the religious, edu- 
cational, and welfare work of the Center. 
Almost the entire sum came from the 
Paulist Fathers, who established this work. 
The report emphasized the fact that the 
money itself came from the generous 
contributions and donations from pari- 
shioners and friends. A small sum is 
raised each year through an annual ba- 
zaar and from contributions of Chinese 
Catholics. The Center receives no pri- 
vate grant nor public aid from any source. 

From only five of the lay organizations 
were financial figures available. The 
receipts of these groups during the year 
totaled $527.00, while their expenditures 
ran to $455.00. 

That further progress may be achieved 
this year by the Catholic Center is the 
hope expressed by Father Johnson. He 
is not content to rest on the laurels of 
good work already done. Said he: 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Sir: Enclosed find # for 

period of The Chinese Digest. 

Name 

Address 

City State 

Six Months $1.25; 1 Year $2.00;Foreign $2.75 Year. 



LOWA CLUB DANCE 

Among the festive crowd at the Lowa 
Club's Chinese New Year's dance were 
the following northern California dele- 
gates: Muriel Lee of Oakland, Billy 
Won and Taft Chung of San Francisco, 
Earl Goon, Hubert Dong and Billy Lee 
of Watsonville. Another dance event 
will be given at the end of the month by 
the Celestial Club. 

• • 

PAGE PRINCE OF WALES 

While riding, Lai Yi Sing, an Oakland 
Chinese, was injured Monday noon when 
he fell off his horse. Passersby rushed 
him to the emergency hospital where 
physicians found that he suffered brain 
concussion. 

• • 

Musical compositions of George Wong, 
prominent Chinese baritone, are on ex- 
hibition at the Los Angeles Public Li- 
brary for a period of two weeks. 

• • 
FEATURE PLAYER BACK 

Doing a "comeback" a la Robson style, 
Mrs. Ann Mar, feature player in the si- 
lent days of the cinema, has a nice speak- 
ing role in the forthcoming Warner O- 
land picture, "Charlie Chan At the Cir- 

ri 
CUS . 

In her first talkie role, Mrs. Mar, who 
incidentally directs the only Chinese 
health clinic in southern California, plays 
the part of Mrs. Charlie Chan, and the 
mother of fourteen children. 



"1935 is now of the past and 1936 
presents a challenge. A living insti- 
tution may not stand still. It either 
progresses or retrogrades. We are 
determined to move onward and up- 
ward. So that the ideal of progress 
for St. Mary's Chinese Social Center 
in 1936 may best be expressed in the 
forcible word — forward." 
• • 

"HEARTACHES" 

(Sum Hun) 

Starring 
WAI KIM FONC 

Supporting Cast: 

BEAL WONC HENRY TUNC 

CHOW SAU YU 

Shown at the 

MANDARIN THEATER 

Sat. Feb. 15— 12 P. M. to 6 P. M. 

Sun., Feb. 16— 11 A. M. to 1 A.M. 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page IS 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



ON WINGS TO CHINA 

1936 will always be a memorable year 
for China and America. 

Pan American Airways, the company 
which sent the China Clipper on its his- 
toric flight to Manila last year, has taken 
the initiative in opening an air route 
between China and America. It has done 
a good job, too. 

By opening this route, a dream of 
centuries will have been realized. One 
may spend his vacation, even though it 
be only two weeks, on a marvelous air 
journey to the Orient, enjoy a leisurely 
weekend, and be back in time to resume 
work, with a regular "Oriental tan" in 
lieu of a "Hollywood tan". 

News in detailed form, photos, finan- 
cial, educational and political matter can 
be transmitted in five days from New 
York to Canton. Truly another Marco 
Polean adventure in industry! 

And now let us take a look at Macao, 
this hitherto little known city in the 
Orient, and destined to become the final 
link between China and America. A 
descriptive explanation of it reads as 
follows: "Macao is a Portuguese colony 
of 157,175 population, of which only 
5,000 are non-Chinese (1927 census), is 
a seaport 40 miles west of Hong Kong, 
with a notably healthy climate, a great 
gambling resort, and trades in opium, 
firecrackers, sea food, tea and cassia." 

From this, one may imagine that the 
city is not only notorious, but an ex- 
tremely dangerous port-of-call. How- 
ever, it is not only one of the cleanest 
cities in the Far East, but it is competent- 
ly governed and boasts of several of the 
most modern hotels, with many points 
of interest in the city itself. 

The Garden and Grotto of Camoes, 
once the resort of the celebrated poet, 
Camoes, the inner -harbor with its ! 
sands of junks, fan-tan houses, cabarets, 
night clubs, and race tracks are all worth 
seeing. 

Known as the Monte Carlo of the 
Orient, it may soon be known also as 
a Hollywood of the Fast. A motion pic- 
ture syndicate has already obtained 
rights to produce there. 

Deep sea fishing, snipe, pheasant, 
duck, pigeon, partridge and rice birds 
are abundant; and bigger game, such 
as boar and deer hunting can be had 
within a short ride into the interior. 
Year round sports include swimming, 
tennis, golfing, hiking and yachting. 



China Biggest Arms 
Customer of U. S. 

Recent reports from the American 
munitions dealers showed that China 
during the month of January did a 
#4,000,000 export business, making China 
the largest customer of the United States 
since it instituted an arms export licens- 
ing system. 

Military experts in the State Depart- 
ment indicated efforts by China to build 
up a strong, modern air force to combat 
the communist armies in China. 

China bought almost three-fourths of 
the war materials exported from America 
in recent months. China's purchases to- 
talled #3,045,395; #2,842,395 of which 
were for military planes, engines, pro- 
pellers and parts. 

• • 

A number of farmers are having ap- 
parent success in experimenting with the 
growing of rice in the low-lying regions 
of Florida. 

• • 

China to Plan Trade Drive 

According to press dispatches from 
Nanking, China, the Ministry of Indus- 
tries is outlining, for promotion of for- 
eign trade, a plan, whereby exporters 
will be urged to cooperate in matters 
pertaining to sales and distribution of 
products. The Ministry will devise mea- 
sures concerning the promotion of eggs, 
silk, cotton goods and tea. Pamphlets 
will be compiled by the Foreign Trade 
Bureau on Chinese imports and exports 
for references. Delegates will be sent 
to other countries to study the industrial 
and commercial developments. 

• • 

There is a daily service between Macao 
and Canton, the mecca of China, by 
very comfortable steamers; and four 
steamers a day each way to Hong Kong, 
making the trip in less than three hours. 
The trip to Canton 88 miles away, is 
made in about 7 hours. A well kept 
air-port in Macao also offers air service 
to Canton, from whence one may travel 
by plane to most of the principal c : t 
of China. 

Another miracle of modern day 
accomplishment may be written in the 
annals of Time, with such tremendous 
opportunities for this new type of trans- 
portation. 

And looking down at us, Father Time 
smiles, and seemingly says, "At last, I've 
knocked down that back fence between 
those two big neighbors !" 



Immigration Statistics 
For 1935 

Following are the immigration stati- 
stics released for 1935: 

1,116 Chinese nationals departed from 
the Port of San Francisco. 

722 Chinese nationals arrived at the 
Port of San Francisco. 

591 United States citizens (Chinese) 
departed from the Port of San Francisco. 

1,166 United States citizens (Chinese) 
arrived at the Port of San Francisco. 

36 Chinese were refused admission and 
deported at the Port of San Francisco: 

(a) 3 applied as aliens; 

(b) 33 applied as citizens of the United 
States. 

124 Chinese were deported from the 
entire continental United States via the 
Port of San Francisco. 

• • 

In Tientsin, China, there are 96 differ- 
ent makes of automobiles among the 
1,816 cars in the city, from practically 
every motor manufacturing country in 
the world. 

• • 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Taft (San Francisco) 
Mar. 3; President McKinley (Seattle) 
Mar. 4; President Hoover (San Francisco) 
Mar. 11; President Grant (Seattle) Mar. 
18; President Pierce (San Francisco) 
Mar. 31; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Apr. 1. President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Apr. 8; President Jackson (Se- 
attle) Apr. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Apr. 28; President McKinley 
(Seattle) Apr. 29. 
SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Garfield (San Francisco) 
Feb. 14; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Feb. 15; President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Feb. 21; President Harrison (San 
Francisco) Feb. 28; President Jackson 
(Seattle) Feb. 29; President Lincoln 
(San Francisco) Mar. 6; President Hayes 
(San Francisco) Mar. 13. President Mc- 
Kinley (Seattle) Mar. 14; President Hoo- 
ver (San Francisco) Mar. 20; President 
Wilson (San Francisco) Mar. 27; Presi- 
dent Grant (Seattle) Mar. 28. 



Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 14, 1936 



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Vol. 2, No. 8 



February 21, 1936 



Five Cents 



CURRENT NEWS ABOUT CHINA 



By Tsu Pan 



• NANKING'S WARNING 

• COMMUNISTS DEFEATED 

• THE CHRISTIAN GENERAL 

• JAPAN ALARMED 

• U. S. INSISTS "OPEN DOOR" 

"Beware of the communists!" was the timely warning 
issued last week by the Central Executive Committee 
of the Kuomintang at Nanking, China, to the entire 
Chinese nation. The warning appeared in the form of 
a manifesto which pointed out that the renewed activi- 
ties of the communists and other reactionary elements 
are camouflaging their movements under patriotic 
names. 

The central authorities are keenly concerned, the 
manifesto states, over the many reactionary organs 
which have sprung up like mushrooms in Shanghai and 
elsewhere. Exhorting the people not to be misguided 
and allured by such subversive movements, the mani- 
festo pleads that at the present moment the only sal- 
vation of the nation lies in the preserving of the con- 
certed strength of man power and material power in 
national reconstruction. 

The government at Nanking had received informa- 
tion previously, it is said, that the reactionary forces 
are attempting to effect a comeback by working under 
the guise of patriotic organizations. The people are 
asked to carefully examine the nature of these organi- 
zations in order to expose their ulterior motives. 



The marauding communists who were chased into 
the western regions of the Szechuan province by Gen- 
eral Chiang Kai-shek's forces during the past few years, 
received another fatal blow from the hands of the pro- 
vincial troops last week. 

Heavy casualties were inflicted to the hordes of com- 
munists under the notorious chieftains, Chu Teh and 
Hsu Hsiang, in a series of sanguinary engagements 
with Szechuan troops, according to a military report 
from Chengtu, the capital of Szechuan province. 
Assisted by air bombing squadrons, the provincial army 
under the command of Lieutenant-General Sun Chen 
badly demolished the red forces. About two hundred 
communists were captured and fifteen machine guns 
and three hundred rifles were seized. 

Another military report declared that General Liang 



Hua-sheng of the ninety-second division had also de- 
feated a large horde of communists about one hundred 
and fifty miles southwest of Chengtu. In this case the 
air forces were reported to be especially effective in 
routing the marauders. 



Before a crowded audience at the Central Kuomin- 
tang, Chinese Nationalist Party, "Christian General" 
Feng Yu-hsiang gave a lengthy address on the topic of 
China's road to salvation last week. 

The keynote of General Feng's speech consisted of 
three points: 

(1) China must thoroughly reform its political ma- 
chinery and arouse the spirit and support of the entire 
people for concerted action. 

(2) China must study intelligently the diplomatic 
trends of the foreign powers and formulate her foreign 
policies accordingly, in order to bring about favorable 
opinions and friendly relations. 

(3) China must reenforce her national defense. 
The Christian General quoted the late Dr. Sun Yat 

Sen in saying that the lost rights of a nation can some- 
times be recovered, but the national spirit must be kept 
in order to expect such a recovery. 



The militarists in Japan were greatly disturbed last 
week when they reviewed reports of the ammunitions 
going into China. 

Aside from the three million dollars worth of ammu- 
nitions and airplanes bought from the United States, 
China is also said to have purchased lately twelve tanks 
and twenty-five pieces of fifteen inch guns from Great 
Britain. 

A Japanese military attache at Nanking was quoted 
as saying that he believes China is preparing for war. 
He entertains serious doubts that these equipments were 
intended for the use of the anti-communist campaigns 
as they are purported to be. 

"We hope China will remember" he said, "that if 
Japan declared war against China, we can occupy whole 
China within two months!" 



Speaking before the Chicago Council of Foreign 
Relations last week, Mr. William Phillips, Undersecre- 
tary of the U. S. State Department, again reaffirmed 
(Continued on Page 15) 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday, February 21,1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



PORTLAND NEWS 

A new years term in Chinese school 
was started last Tuesday at the Chinese 
Benevolent Association. 

With the faculty consisting of Miss 
Bessie Lee, Mr. Wong, Mr. Chin, and Mr. 
H. Lock, 96 newly enrolled Chinese stu- 
dents will be taught to master their na- 
tive language in reading, writing, and 
arithmetic. 



Entering into its eleventh year of or- 
ganization, the new officers of the Chi- 
nese Girls' Club for the ensuing year are: 
Mrs. James Jower, president; Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Lee, vice-president; Lalun Chin, 
secretary; and Dorothy Moe, treasurer. 



The Chinese Women's Club organized 
three years ago recently had its election 
of officers. Those elected are: president, 
Mrs. Park Chin, vice-presidents, Mrs. 
Winge H. Lee and Dr. Goldie Chan; 
English secretaries, Mrs. Stanley Chin 
and Mrs. John Wong; Chinese secretary, 
Mrs. Wan Jower; treasurers, Mrs. Her- 
bert Wong and Mrs. Gum Yuen. The 
purpose of this club is principally phil- 
anthropic. It is also very civic minded, 
and has combined its efforts with var- 
ious other organizations to further worth- 
while projects. 

Andrew Louie, graduated Chinese 
pharmacist, is also the new manager of 
• the Huber Cafe, which is the popular 
meeting place of the younger set. 

Miss Margaret Paul and George Lee 
will be married today, February 21st. 
The ceremony will take place at the home 
of the bride-to-be. 

Miss Nellie Lee of Marshfield and Dr. 
Chan of Salem, Oregon, announced their 
engagement at a banquet given by Miss 
Lee's aunt during her brief stay in Port- 
land. 

• • 

N. Y. GIRL TRIES SUICIDE 

Returning by train from Cleveland to 
her home in New York City, a Chinese 
girl, Harriet Ling, attempted to commit 
suicide by swallowing poison on board 
the train last week. Ling, who is 22 years 
of age and lives at 26 Henry Street, New 
York, failed to advance any reason for 
the attempt. 

At the Central Station in New York, 
relatives and friends found her uncon- 
scious. Half a bottle of poison was by 
her side. Rushed to the Emergency Hos- 
pital, she was given a fair chance to live. 



Hip Wo To Give Play 

The Hip Wo School of San Francisco 
will sponsor a play on Saturday, Mar. 7, 
at the Chinese Y. W. C. A. It is urged 
that the Chinese public support this affair 
to raise funds for the school. 

It was announced that due to the in- 
creasing enrollment of students, the tea- 
ching staff of the school has been aug- 
mented by the addition of several new 
instructors. The student body at present 
is approximately 430. 

• • 
DIXIE VARIETIES 

The Square and Circle Club announces 
the presentation of "Dixie Varieties" as 
their spring project this year. Two per- 
formances will be given, the dates being 
tentatively set as June 6 and 7. 

This variety show is their semi-annual 
benefit project, the proceeds of which go 
to their orphans' fund from which 
regular contributions are made to the 
home for underprivileged Chinese boys 
in El Cerrito. 

• • 

Union meeting service was held at the 
Chinese Methodist Church last Sunday, 
Feb. 16, at 3:30 p. m. Miss Betty Hu, 
girl evangelist from Shanghai, delivered 
the sermon on the topic of "Salvation". 



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Allee, the Towntrotter, says: 

THOMAS CHUCK (former S. F.) is 
still matriculating at Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology in Boston. His Chi- 
nese name is CHUCK SING LUP, in 
case you've forgotten .... ANN LEONG 
(also local girl) is a member of the Pre- 
Medical Club of Bethel College in Tenn- 
essee .... another local boy HEN'RY 
SEID lives in Brooklyn, New York .... 
RICHARD 'MING' LEE and VINCENT 
GUNN took part in the Boy Scouts radio 
broadcast over KPO last week and were 
they nervous! .... Mrs. ALICE DONG 
LEE of the LILAC BEAUTY SHOPPE 
returned after a short vacation in Wat- 
sonville with her two sons RONALD and 
JERRY .... going all points north 
(Portland) HOWARD FUNG left town 
on a business trip. He's traveling sales- 
man for the CHINA DRY GOODS CO. 
.... Believe me, Cupid's in China- 
town: HERBERT LEE (Oakland) and 
that fascinating and appealing gal, Miss 
HELEN YEE, are "stepping out" these 
rainy days .... Here's a secret — 
ANDREW WONG of the UNIQL • 
SHOP and Miss FLORENCE LEONG 
are reported engaged — after a short ro- 
mance! .... JUNE LUM (Napa) is 
seen "strollin' down the avenue" with one 
of the town boys — the lucky guy (you're 
doing fine!) .... Happy Event — Mr. 
Stork visited Mr. and Mrs. EDWARD 
SEID last week and brought a baby 
daughter .... Do you know that: RI- 
CHARD LOWE left for San Diego and 
a farewell party was given by his dear 
cousins MARSHALL and WILSON 
LOWE .... another local boy is leaving 
town, THOMAS NG (member of Can- 
ton Noodle Co.) will sail on the Pres. 
Coolidge this Friday .... LT. PAUL 
WONG, sent back here by the Chinese 
Government for advance aeronautic and 
military tactics at the Naval S:ation in 
San Diego is also leaving on the same 
boat — (he's a former S. F. boy) now 
attached to the 3rd Squadron of the 
Canton Air Force .... JAMES LEE 
(formerly of L. A.) also attached to the 
Canton Air Force is now called LT. LEE 
SING .... and ALBERT WONG (of 
S. F.) better known as 'Suicide Al' of 
dare-devil motorcycle fame, is now head 
mechanic at the Southwestern Aviation 
Corp. in Canton — happily married and 
a proud daddy .... HARRY WOO who 
left the city not long ago is also connected 
with aviation in China .... So-o-o-o. 

until next week SO LONG 

Better Paper 



Friday, February 21, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Pag« 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



Oakland Troop 45 Prepares 
For Scout Circus 

The Chinese Boy Scouts of Oakland 
Troop 45 were invited to demonstrate 
their skill in the art of plaster casting 
at H. C. Capwell's during Scout Week. 
Their exhibition received much atten- 
tion and favorable comment from those 
who attended. 

According to their Scoutmaster and 
Green Bar Council the scouts are now 
preparing for their Annual Scout Circus, 
which is to be given on the evenings of 
Feb. 28 and 29 at the Municipal Audi- 
torium. The Scouts have selected "Pi- 
oneering" as their project construction 
of an observation tower; the over-all 
height will be 22 feet. The material 
used will be just ropes and logs. Time 
limit allowed for this construction will 
be only ten minutes. This will be one 
of the outstanding features of the entire 
circus. 

Prior to the circus the Scouts are plan- 
ning to stage a "Pre-Circus Exhibition" 
of their stunt for their parents and 
friends. This review is to be held at Madi- 
son Square, Oak and Eighth Streets, Sun- 
day, Feb. 23, at 2 p. m. 

Their Scoutmaster, Dr. Raymond L. 
Ng, wishes to announce that the public 
is cordially invited to attend both of their 
exhibitions. 

• • 

While on his way to work at the Bel- 
mont Sanatorium, Hall Sing You, kit- 
chen help, accosted a Filipino chaffeur, 
who bid him a cheery good morning and 
then suddenly floored him with a punch 
in the face. The Filipino then fled. Hall 
immediately reported the matter to the 
police in Redwood City. 



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OAKLAND NEWS 

To replenish a depleting coffer, the 
Oakland Chinese Presbyterian Church is 
presenting a mammoth Dinner and Food 
Carnival on March 11, at the First Pres- 
byterian Church, 26th and Broadway. 
Six hundred anticipated guests will be 
amply and variedly satisfied that evening. 

For those who appreciate music, George 
Jung and Ira Lee are filling the enter- 
tainment program with pleasing inter- 
ludes; for the epicures who relish de- 
licious food, provisions from Oakland 
wholesale houses have been procured gra- 
tis through Carl Chung of Wilson Mar- 
ket, 344 East 14th St., and for those with 
the peculiar knack of winning things, 
alluring prizes are offered. 

The cause is a worthy one. The price 
is fifty cents per plate. The time is 6 
p. m. 



Last Sunday, Valentine Joyce Wye, 
attired in a becoming green crepe Shirley 
Temple dress, celebrated her attainment 
of eight worldly years with a riotious 
birthday party at home. Her guest-list 
included Elfreda and Norma Young, Bet- 
ty Lee, Calvin Joe, Billy, Sonny and 
James Tom and Ralston Eng from Oak- 
land; and Dolores, Jeanette and Leland 
Wing from Vallejo. 

The young group indulged in parlor 
games with minor injury to the furniture. 
Then to the accompaniment of gasps and 
exclamations, Father Gay Wye performed 
astounding magical illusions rehearsed 
from a "Ten Thousand Tricks for Ten 
Cents" book. Sandwiches, a birthday 
cake, jello and Chinese waffle restored 
expended energy. The party threatened 
to continue indefinitely but the parents 
of the children ran out of gossip, so the 
young folk reluctantly had to leave. 



Under the direction of Professor Bun- 
dy, the Oakland Chinese-American Chor- 
us, consisting of over forty voices, will 
present a half-hour program over Sta- 
tion KROW this Sunday, Feb. 23, at 
3:30 p. m. The recital will feature se- 
lected numbers by the chorus, a violin 
rendition by Winona Young, accompan- 
ied at the piano by her sister, Gertrude, 
and as a highlight of the program, gold- 
en-throated George Jung, Oakland's pre- 
mier tenor, will be heard in a solo. 

The chorus was organized January 19 
and meets every Friday evening from 
7:30 to 9 at the Chinese Presbyterian 
Church on Eighth Street. 
Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Ma/(e This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Talented Stage Star on Air 

Those who tuned in last Sunday even- 
ing on Paul Whiteman's program spon- 
sored by Woodbury in their Coast to 
Coast hookup certainly received a treat, 
for it is seldom that a Chinese appears 
on such popular and valuable broadcasts. 

The young man who sang the Chinese 
interpretation of "The Music Goes Round 
and Round" was none other than the 
talented and accomplished stage actor, 
Honorable Wu. From San Francisco, it 
may be said that his voice "floats through 
the air with the greatest of ease." 

San Franciscans will remember him as 
the star of the "Chinese Showboat" re- 
vue which played the Warfield and Gold- 
en Gate Theatres several years ago. 

Public opinion has it that the Chinese, 
especially, look forward to hearing him 
again soon. 

• • 

'Tin/' Weds 

George "Tiny" Leong, who left this 
city for China two months ago, was mar- 
ried last month to Ruth Mae Jue, of 
Lee Village, Hoy Ping district, the cere- 
mony taking place at the Wah Sun Hall 
at Chack Horn City. The Rev. K. N. 
Leong, formerly of the Los Angeles Con- 
gregational Church, officiated. 

Mrs. Leong is a former San Francisco 
girl. "Tiny" is a former football star of 
the local Commerce High and Chinese 
teams. 

• • 
ENGAGEMENT PARTY 

A party was given last Sunday night 
at the Sun Hung Heong Cafe by the 
mother of Sanford Chan, upon his en- 
gagement to Miss Constance King of 
Locke, California. Relatives and close 
friends of both families were present. 

On Monday night another party was 
given to all their friends at the home of 
Mrs. Chan. Cocktails and refreshments 
were served. 

• • 
A daughter was born on Jan. 30 to 

the wife of Gim Far, 182-6th St., Oak- 
land. 




Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 21,1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 

On February 8th, the Mei Wah girls 
club had a party at Mrs. May Wong's 
home in Hollywood. The party was in 
honor of Miss Frances Wong, a member 
of the club who had just graduated from 
Jefferson High School. At the same 
time, the new officers of the club were 
installed. The guests spent the evening 
in card games and dancing. 



The Chinese Congregational Church 
held their annual dinner at the Tung 
Ah Low Cafe on Sunday evening, Feb. 9. 
Ninety persons attended the dinner with 
Dr. and Mrs. Taylor of the University 
of Southern California as the guests. Re- 
ports of the past year were made by the 
various chairmen and officers of the 
church. Elections for new officers and 
the board of directors were held earlier 
in the day. 



Frank Young's China Boys held their 
first dance last Saturday evening at the 
Macabee Hall. This recently organized 
Chinese orchestra is proving very popu- 
lar, indeed. They have performed at 
many Chinese dances thus far. 



General Tu invited his Mandarin lan- 
guage class to his new twenty-eight room 
home in Pasadena last Friday night for 
an hour of lessons. Rest of the evening 
was spent socially. Most enjoyable were 
the vocal selections rendered by General 
Tu. He was accompanied at the piano 
by the charming Mrs. Tu. 



A first prize of 5200 goes to Gilbert 
Leong for his piece of sculpturing dis- 
played at the last Los Angeles County 
Fair held at Pomona, California. 

For his outstanding artistic ability hs 
has earned scholarships to the Chouinard 
School of Art, one of the leading art 
schools on the Pacific Coast. Presently, 
he will be transferred to U. S. C. 



Miss Hong Kwan Wong, of the Uni- 
versity of Redlands spoke on "The His- 
tory of Hawaii" at the 18th Annual Girl 
Reserves Mid- Winter Conference of Sou- 
thern California held at the Pacific Pali- 
sades this month. She is an exchange 
student from the University of Hawaii. 

Over four hundred girls, advisors, and 
"Y" secretaries were in attendance. Dor- 
othy Hoo and Mari Young represented 
the Chinese Tri-Y Club. Miss Young 
participated in the closing ceremony of 
the conference. 

Patronize Our 



"BAFFLING MYSTIFIER" 

ENTERTAINS 

Ming Gee, known as the "Baffling 
Mystifier", recently was one of the enter- 
taining sensations in Reno, Nevada, in 
the "Night of Magic" program sponsored 
by the Reno Magic Circle, Assembly 28, 
Society of American Magicians. 

More than five hundred persons sat 
spell-bound for three hours watching the 
presentation of tricks and feats of skill, 
in the Civic Auditorium. 

Ming, an Oriental who knows all the 
Occidental tricks, took top honors by 
stealing the show. His performance con- 
sisted of plucking lighted cigarettes out 
of the air and making them disappear 
again, weaving numerous hoops into 
geometrical figures, and doing tricks with 
ropes. He also did card tricks wearing 
canvas gloves. All his tricks were com- 
pletely mystifying to the audience. 

• • 

STUDENTS' CONVENTION 

According to word received from Ann 
Leong, former San Francisco girl, who 
now attends the Bethel College in Mc- 
Kenzie, Tennessee, the State Students' 
Volunteer Convention is holding a meet- 
ing in Nashville, Tenn., on Feb. 28. 

Miss Leong is a pre-medical student 
and upon receiving her A. B. degree, 
hopes to enter an Eastern medical school. 

• • 
OVERSEAS PENMAN 
CLUB ISSUES ANNUAL 

Manager Chock Lun announced that 
the seventh volume of the Hawaii Chinese 
annual will be published for distribution 
by the Overseas Penman Club in March. 
The annual, the first volume of which was 
issued in 1930, is printed in both English 
and Chinese, the printing costs being 
assumed by Honolulu business concerns. 



See Me Before You Buy 

ARTHUR N. DICK 

REPRESENTING 

Plymouth Chrysler 

• 

Bigger Trade-in Allowance 

Low Finance Rate 

Phones: CH 1824 or PRos. 2400 

james w. McAllister, inc. 

Van Ness at Post San Francisco 



Hawaii Chinese in 
Radio Club 

Many Chinese are among the sixty 
members who are enrolled in the Amateur 
Radio Club, sponsored by the city-county 
recreation commission in Honolulu. 
Many more are expected to enroll in the 
free course in radio, as these classes are 
open to all those fifteen years of age 
and over who are interested in obtaining 
amateur radio licenses and in amateur 
radio in general. 

Among the Chinese members are: Yai 
Pang, Y. S. Ching, Al Chu, R. S. Ching, 
Bernard Loo, Henry Sui, Harry Kau. 
Francis M. Chang, Alex Wong. Harry 
Goo, David Sim, John Chang. George 
Loo, Arthur Lum, and S. N. Wun. 

• • 
GENERAL TU HOLDS CHINA 
MUST BE MILITARISTIC 

In an interview last week to Los An- 
geles newspapermen, General Ting Hsui 
Tu, an official of the Nanking Central 
Military Academy and who is in South- 
ern California as the official representa- 
tive from China in connection with the 
filming of the picture, "Good Earth", 
stated that China must become a militar- 
istic nation unless Japan stops her policy 
of aggression toward the Chinese. 

• • 

CATHAYANS ELECTIONS 

The Cathayan Orchestra held its an- 
nual election and general meeting at the 
Cathay Club, on Feb. 10. Practically 
every member of the Orchestra plus two 
of their honorary members were given 
posts. As a result, the following officers 
were elected: orchestra leader. David 
Sum; assistant leader, Willie Wong; se- 
cretary, Ted Lee; treasurer, Robert Wong: 
librarian, William Lee; business mana- 
ger, Edward Quon; publicity manager. 
Kenneth Lee; arrangers, Winfrcd Lee 
and William Chan; custodian. Allen Lin 
Lee; art directors, Thomas Bow and Le- 
on Lim. 

The orchestra reports that for the re- 
lative short history of the organization, 
it has met with great progress and a most 
successful season last y< 

Two feature singers of the Cathayans 
are Miss Frances Chun and Dudley Lcc. 

• • 
LOWA AUXILIARY ELECTS 

The Lowa Club Auxiliary of Los An- 
geles election took place last week, with 
the following chosen by the charter mem- 
bers: president, Edith Lee: vice-president. 
Ling Chan; and secretary-treasurer. Julia 
Ung. 



Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Friday, February 21,1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 5 



TEA AND LANTERNS 



Y. C. ANNIVERSARY 
BALL 

(Written right after the dance) 
By Clara Chan 

On Feb. 15th, the "exclusive" Yoke 
Choy gave their fifteenth anniversary 
ball. In case you don't know anything 
about these social-minded Y. C. men, 
allow me to inform you that once a year 
the lads dig out their tuxedos from the 
moth balls and give them an annual air- 
ing (a good preventive against vicious 
moths), and throw such a grand affair 
that it justifies at least a few months of 
post mortem. (You remember when — -) 
This year the brawl, I mean ball, was 
held in the Italian room of the St. Fran- 
cis Hotel. Yoke Choy gained their ex- 
perience from last year when they dis- 
covered that the Italian room was small 
enough to shout down the president's 
speech (Wingo, my sympathies), and to 
boo at the out-going president's speech 
(that's why Wong Yee's face was red all 
evening) . 

Dancing began at nine o'clock, and 
lasted till one. The Chinatown Knights' 
Orchestra played songs which were dedi- 
cated to the guests and members of the 
club. The Y. C. men, "sinfoo" as they 
claim, revived pleasant memories from 
these old ditties. P. S. I wonder if the 
orchestra played "The Prisoners Song." 

Not to be outdone by the men, the wo- 
men dressed "to kill", (no comeback from 
the fashion writer of the Life). Among 
the hundred or more guests who, defying 
the wet pavements of S. F., arrived from 
all parts of California, the fashion scout 
was busy all evening admiring the smart 
gowns. Here are a few of the outfits noted: 
MRS. WILLIAM (BILL) CHINN in 
black crepe, with two large gardenias at 
the neckline. MISS MARION TONG 
in pale green, with high neckline. Jade 
ornaments. Wish more of the girls 
would wear Chinese jewelry. MISS 
GRACE CHEW in white crepe with slit 
tunic skirt. MRS. LESTER LEE in white 
matelasse with a perfectly stunning Chi- 
nese wrap, fashioned after an old Man- 
chu robe. MISS PAULINE TONG in 
dull gold crinkled crepe, very low back. 
MISS FLORA CHAN in white lace and 
orchids. MRS. WONG YEE in simple 
black crepe, with an unusual corsage of 
white jasmine. MISS ALICE CHEW 
in white lace gown and short jacket, also 
of white lace. 

MISS MARY WONG in a new print; 
MISS MARION FONG in a modern 



gown of black skirt and white bodice; 
MRS. COLLIN DONG in pink crepe, 
with a coronation of pink flowers; MRS. 
THOMAS CHINN in royal purple taf- 
feta (a favorite color of mine) ; MRS. 
IRA LEE in red chiffon; MISS ALICE 
ENG in yellow taffeta; MISS ALICE 
LUM in black crepe with a glittering 
spangle yoke; MRS. IRA CHUNG in 
rose lace; MISS MARION DONG in red 
taffeta with a head veil of white net; 
MISS LOIS CHAN in black crepe with 
silver sandals; MRS. CHARLIE CHAN 
in green with white fox cape; MRS. WYE 
WING in blue taffeta with rows of tiny 
ruffles on skirt; MISS JADIN WONG 
in a Chinese long gown of ivory satin 
with fine embroidery; MISS MIRIAM 
LUM in pink satin with a ruffle cape; 
MISS CONNIE KING in white mouse- 
line de soir; MRS. HUBERT DONG in 
cerise crepe gown; MISS GLADYS TOM 
in white taffeta with gardenia headdress; 
MISS MABEL MAR in black crepe, low 
back; MISS MABEL YEE in pink taffeta 
with a Chinese wrap; MISS JANIE KOE 
in black taffeta; MISS HATTIE CHUN 
in blue crepe; MISS ALICE YOUNG 
in emerald green (another favorite color 
of mine), low back and beaded bodice; 
MRS. JOE CHEW in black net with 
ruffle cape collar; MRS. JOHN WONG 
in red and white; MRS. BALFOUR 
CHINN in white crepe; MRS. MYRON 
CHAN in black net over taffeta; .... 
"And the music goes 'round and 
'round", and for many of the revelers the 
party really didn't end till Sunday's wee 
hours. And to think, we have to wait 
one whole year for another such party 
to come around. 

• • 

CHINESE CLUB ANNUAL DINNER 
Members of the Chuck Sin Tong, Kam- 
akela Lane, Honolulu, held their annual 
meeting and dinner Sunday, Feb. 9. This 
club is an organization for the people 
of Wong Leong Doo, Chungshan dis- 
trict, Kwangtung province, China, and 
their descendants. Chew On Lin is pres- 
ident. 

• • 



HOWARD MACEE 

COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 

• 

EXbrook 0298 San Francisco 

Anglo Bank Bldg. - 830 Market St. 



Lien Fa Saw You 

An informal banquet was held at the 
Sun Hung Heung Cafe, with members 
of both Miss Constance King and San- 
ford Chan's families present, and a few 
close friends. The to-be bride was ap- 
propriately attired in a deep red satin 
Chinese gown, piped with white, a stiff 
high collar, and high splits on either side 
of the skirt. 

Miss King was very attractive, but the 
biggest attraction was on her third 
finger — 3 baguettes on either side of tne 
beautiful large diamond in the center. 

Included in this dinner was the darling 
little Phyllis Won, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Roderick Won, (the former Susie 
Lee). Little Phyllis had on a pink silk 
frock with many layers of ruffles, a 
matching ribbon on her soft curled hair, 
and matched again was her healthy com- 
plexion with very rosy cheeks and spark- 
ling eyes. 

Miss Marian Fong, also a guest at the 
banquet, looked ultra exquisite with her 
hair arranged so smartly, two rolls swirl- 
ed on top of her head, shadow waves 
softly in back ending in curls at the back 
of her neck. It was a very attractive 
coiffeur on Miss Fong. 

• • 
MONTEREY CHINESE 
TO SPONSOR DANCE 

The Chinese of Monterey are spon- 
soring a dance on Friday, February 28, 
at the Ocean View Hotel, for the purpose 
of raising funds for the Chung Wah 
School of that city, it was reported. Door 
prizes, refreshments and a floor show will 
be included in the program. 

Those who are planning to attend will 
be interested to know that it is to be a 
Leap Year Costume Ball. 

• • 
"JOLLY MUSKETEERS" PARTY 

"Hearts were trumps" at a Valentine 
Party given by the Jolly Musketeers. Girl 
Reserve Club, at the Chinese Y. W. C. A. 
on Friday evening, Feb. 14. Games, 
dancing, and refreshments made the eve- 
ning a gay one for the fifty boys and 
girls who attended. The chairmen of 
the committees which worked out the de- 
tails of the event were Agnes Chong, Lucy 
Won, Rita Juan, and Minerva Fung. 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 21,1936 




Surf grey, Woodbark 
brown, Powder blue, 
Tudor grey, in new 
Spring "Action-back" 
model. Singleand 
double breasted. 



by Hart Schaffner 8C Marx 



MRS. HILLBILLY home-spun the fabric for her man's 
clothes. She knew it had to wear a long time. She gave it 
rugged beauty, too . . . Now Hart Schaffner dC Marx have 
reproduced it in Blue Ridge Home- ' , ■" ~— ; -* Ji4 - i - ' ll1 ' **? 
spun for our city Nabobs. Casual u) ' J »JV 
. . . comfortable . . . lots of J ^^ 

class. 

MOORE'S 

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clotlm 

840 Market 141 Kearny * 1450 B'way 

Opp. Emporium Near Sutter Oakland 

(^Chinese Salesman here: Edward Leong) 




COLDAY (Ed Leong) SEZ: 

BOY, OH BOY— am I taking a 
ribbing! And this picture of mine is the 
cause of it. My friends say the picture's 
all right — it's just the face that's in it! 
But some day they'll be sorry — possibly 
when it's enlarged and plastered all over 
Chinatown under the caption "COLDAY 
YIN FOR DOG CATCHER.' 1 Might 
try it as a side line, you know. Then 
youse guys will have to be content with 
"I knew him when." 
-•- 
AND NOW THAT YOU'RE SO 
NICE I'll tell you about the "Topper" 
and it's yours for five pieces of silver 
(the big ones). Combining the best lines 
of the famous "Tyro" and smart 
"Slant", the "Topper" is all its name 
implies. Has kick-up-in-back brim with 
matching felt binding. You'll know that 
Spring has come when you see the colors. 
— •- 
Manhattan has created a shirt 
I'm sure you'll consider quite pert; 
Smart white pique is the fabric 
Smart fellows will certainly grab it. 
Slip into this "Duke of Kent" 
For only two dollars well spent; 
The collar is smartly wide-spaced 
And it's rated "tops" in good ta>te. 

— •— 
SNOW AND RAIN STORMS don't 
mean a thing to Moore's. Spring is all 
over the place. Make it a point to cast 
your glimmers over the new Palm Beach 
line of suits at $16.75 while the size 
selection is new and complete. Biggest 
stock they ever had. Whites in single 
and double breasted models. Light 
summery greys and tans in single breasted 
sport-backs. Or the single coats for 
$11.75 and single trousers for $5. And 
if you want to go ritzy in a torm.il wav. 
there's the new white coat and black 
trouser tuxedo outfit at $18.50 that's as 
smart a thing your dancing partner can 
lay an arm around. 



Friday, February 21, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Pag« 7 



CHINATOWNIA 



Students Activities at U. C. SEATTLE NEWS 



On January 3 1 the Chinese Students' 
Club of the University of California 
commemorated the fourth anniversary of 
the defense of Shanghai with William 
Jing presiding, as reported by Howard 
Wong. Professor Leo Rogin spoke on 
the topic: "What Attitudes Should Chi- 
nese Students Take Toward the Social 
Reconstruction in China?" Alvin Joe 
secretary of the Far Eastern Relations 
Committee, gave a report on the activi- 
ties of the committee. President William 
Jing then gave an outline of the future 
activities of the club during the semester. 
This was followed by refreshments. 



The delegates of the Chinese students 
of the bay region colleges held their first 
conference at the Chinese Y. W. C. A. 
on February 8. About thirty delegates 
representing the University of California, 
Stanford University, San Francisco 
College, Heald's College, Lincoln Uni- 
versity, San Francisco J. C, San Mateo 
J. C, and Marin J. C. attended the con- 
ference. C. Yue Shih presided. The 
Committee of Five was created to draft 
a constitution. At the same place, the 
next meeting will be held on Saturday, 
March 21, when officers will be elected. 
All Chinese college students are urged 
to attend. 



The skating party given by the club 
was attended by approximately two hun- 
dred people on February 12 at Roller- 
land, Oakland. The party lasted from 
10 p. m. to 1 a. m. 

• • 
REV. JOHNSON LECTURES 

Father George W. P. Johnson, director 
of the St. Mary's Catholic Chinese School 
and Social Center, gave a sermon last 
week at the Old St. Mary's Church, Cali- 
fornia and Grant Avenue, speaking on 
the topic of "The Sowing of the Seed in 
San Francisco's Chinatown." Father 
Johnson discussed what the Paulist Fa- 
thers are accomplishing among the San 
Francisco Chinese. 

• • 
"HEARTACHES" SHOWN 

"Heartaches" was shown to large 
crowds last Saturday and Sunday at the 
Chinese Mandarin Theatre. 

Included in the cast were Estelle Lee, 
formerly of Portland and Tong Dai Kam 
and Henry Fung, former San Franciscans. 



Fried chicken, southern style, was the 
main reason why the U. of W. Chinese 
Students' Club's first winter quarter social 
at the Coon Chicken Inn on Friday, Feb. 
14, attracted twenty-five hungry Joseph- 
ine Co-eds, Joe Colleges, and their dates. 
A Valentine motif was used by the com- 
mittee, Miss Mary Hong, Messrs. Jack 
Wong, Frank Nipp, and Albert Wong. 
Dancing was enjoyed by all afterwards at 
the Club Cotton. 

Among those seen at the Students' 
affair was Miss Eva Lee, fair Victoria 
B. C. visitor, escorted by that gallant 
young sophomore, Francis Drake Leo. 
Miss Lee is visiting friends and relatives 
here for two weeks, and incidentally, en- 
joying the winter social season to the 
utmost. 



It's just impossible to keep Henry 
"Butcher" Luke, popular Students Club 
prexy, out of the headlines. The bril- 
liant scholar was awarded an associate 
membership to Sigma Xi, science honor- 
ary, this week. Only those who have 
published original, high calibre research- 
es are extended full memberships. Asso- 
ciate members are selected from under- 
graduates who show promise with high 
grades, to encourage them to do research 
necessary for full membership. 

Miss Mollie Locke, president, announc- 
ed that the Chinese Girls Club's Tolo 
date has been shifted to Feb. 23, at the 
"Horseshoe Inn", one of the most color- 
ful and popular Chinese night clubs. 



Around the High Schools 

P. G.'s are Mayme Locke at Garfield, 
Mary Luke at Franklin, and Helen Hong 
and Ruth Hwang at Roosevelt. 

When Ruth Hwang won one of the 
positions as first soprano for the Roose- 
velt Hi junior and senior glee clubs, and 
the A Cappella choir, she was but follow, 
ing in the footsteps of her sister, Pris- 
cilla Hwang, who was also a first soprano 
at the same school. 



James "Fifi" Luke, Troop 54 patrol 
leader, forsook the Franklin Hi frosh 
hoop quintet to perform with the Chi- 
nese Students five, earning a regular po- 
sition after three games. 



BRIDGE DATES CHANGED 

The Chinese Y. W. C. A. wishes to 
announce that the class in Contract 
Bridge which has been meeting on Thurs- 
day evenings will be held hereafter on 
Wednesday evenings from 8:00 to 9:00, 
beginning February 19. Mr. Russell, the 
instructor, has had many years of ex- 
perience as a teacher and is prepared 
to work with both beginners and advanced 
students. The class is open to both men 
and women without fee. 
• • 

"965" 

iBusiness and industrial girls in the Y. 
W. C. A. will meet in Sacramento on 
Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 22 and 23, 
for their fourteenth annual Northern Cal- 
ifornia Mid-Winter Conference. The 
theme of the conference is "New Pioneers 
Facing New Frontiers". Some of the 
problems which will be discussed are 
"Our Responsibility for Public Affairs", 
"Our Responsibility for Social Move- 
ments", and "Our Responsibility to Mi- 
nority Groups". 

Members of the Nine-Six-Five Club 
who will attend the conference are Mabel 
Lowe, Marion Look, Carolyn Fong, and 
Amy Lee. 



Here's a good one told on Henry K. 
K. Chinn, colorful U. of W. frosh: 

Driving down U. Way, K. K. ran a 
red light, then an arterial, a cop blew 
his whistle, but K. K. kept going. When 
the cop finally caught up with K. K., the 
resultant conversation took place: 

"Why didn't you stop at the red light?" 

"I didn't see it." 

"Why didn't you stop at the arterial?" 

"I didn't see it." 

"Why didn't you stop at my whistle?" 

"I can't hear." 

"Well, here' a ticket. Go down and 
see the judge Monday, and you'll get your 
hearing back." 



George Louie is seen limping around 
town as the result of an automobile acci- 
dent which he suffered a few weeks ago. 



Miss Lillian Goon, daughter of the 
late Chinese consul, Goon Dip, is aiding 
a group of girls from Garfield High 
School in singing and dancing numbers 
for participation in the school's annual 
Funfest. They are practising and re- 
hearsing at the Chung Wah Hall. 



Page 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 21,1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, #2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, #2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 

STAFF 



CHING WAH LEE 

WILLIAM HOY 

FRED GEORGE WOO 

CLARA CHAN 

ETHEL LUM 



..Associate Editor 
-Associate Editor 
-Sports 



ROBERT G. POON 



Fashions 

-Community Welfare 
Circulation 



CORRESPONDENTS AND REPRESENTATIVES 

Los Angeles William Cot, Elsie Lee 

Oakland Hector Eng, Ernest Loo 

Portland _ Eva Moe, Edgar Lee 

Seattle Eugene Wong, Edwin Luke 

Watsonville, Vicinity „ Iris Wong 



The Chinese Digest believes that the "podii" system, 
while probably justified in existing in former genera- 
tions, certainly does not belong now. 

In publishing the following letter, we believe that 
certain facts have been brought out which tend to 
clarify the situation, and also, to emphasize that, with 
each succeeding decade, especially among modern Chi- 
nese-Americans, the so-called "podii" simply does not 
exist. 

ABOUT ALL THIS "PODII" BUSINESS 

Mr. Tom Irwin, the famous local sport writer and 
columnist, has aroused local interest in his sensational 
"exposure" of a "racket" in San Francisco Chinatown 
through the system of "podii", which appeared in the 
San Francisco Chronicle, February 16, 1936. While we 
appreciate the efforts of the Chronicle in devoting their 
front page to discuss the civic problems of Chinatown, 
a few words need be said here to present the problem 
in its true perspective and to avoid possible misunder- 
standings. 

In the first place how did this "podii" business come 
about? In Chinese business parlance, a "podii" is the 
intangible asset created by the tenant of a business 
establishment through his effort in increasing the econ- 
omic value of that location either by physical improve- 
ments or by establishing a goodwill. When this tenant 
is ready to move or retire from business, he usually 
negotiates with a prospective newcomer to recover this 
intangible asset in a definite sum of money. This is 
not uncommon in American business practice when a 
firm transfers its goodwill to another. 

I believe that there are special reasons which made 
such practices especially prominent here. 

In the old days when Chinese merchants were unable 
to secure leases for their stores from the American 
landowners, they would have to rely upon this method 
to protect themselves from the continued raising of 
rents by unscrupulous landlords. Furthermore, on 



account of the racial prejudices existing elsewhere, the 
Chinese people were confined to their quarter and to 
do business within the limited space in Chinatown. 
Henceforth, they were compelled, under the circum- 
stances, to pay the "podii" in order to secure accomoda- 
tions. 

While there may be cases where the "podii" asked 
have exceeded the improvement value, and where Chi- 
nese as well as American landowners have suffered 
the consequences of being unable to rent their places 
on account of the "podii", I doubt whether anyone has 
ever deliberately extorted money through the use of 
the "podii" system. The "podii" is not a racket! 

As to the fact that real estate properties are passing 
from the hands of Americans to the "Orientals", I fail 
to see why this should cause alarm: since only Ameri- 
can Chinese, i. e., American citizens of Chinese extrac- 
tion, can buy real estate property. These "Orientals" 
are therefore, Americans who, in the eyes of the law, 
are in no way different from any other kind of Amei- 
can citizens. 

And the practice of this "Frankenstein" monster-like 
system is not universally observed in Chinatown. With 
the growth of the younger generations, this "podii" 
business is at its wane. We can cite numerous cases 
where the so-called "tenant's lien" have been completely 
removed and people may come and go at will. To give 
a concrete example, the picture insertion in Mr. Irwin's 
article in the Chronicle is not a "podii" sign! It is a 
statement made to the public by the tenant of that build- 
ing, declaring that he wants NO "podii"! 

San P. Tu. 
February 19, 1936. 



CHINESE GOOD WILL 

There are good-will missionaries, good-will tours, and 
good-will students. International good will cannot 
be over-emphasized. And right in our own midst is 
a center of International thought and friendship, where 
the cosmopolitan spirit is stimulated by a flow of stu- 
dents and friends who come from both Occidental and 
Oriental countries. This is the International House 
at Berkeley, California, a gift from Mr. John D. Rocke- 
feller, Jr. 

The Chinese members form a group of ten resident 
and three associate members. They have organized a 
cultural study group to interpret the culture of the 
Chinese to the American and other racial students. 
Associate membership, open to every one interested, 
are for those who wish to attend the International 
House functions regularly. Its privileges are many for 
a nominal sum. 

Working whole-heartedly and competently in this 
respect is Miss Helen M. Fong, Chinese Student Se- 
cretary, who is ever ready to give information about 
International House activities and to extend .1 warm 
welcome to friends and visitors. 

It is significantly important through whom and to 
whom the interpretation of Chinese culture and good- 
will is extended. 



Friday, February 21, 1936 



CHINESE DiCEST 



Page 9 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



Chinese Inventions and 
Discoveries 

(XII) China Originated 
The Informal Garden. 

We take the cultivated gardens today 
for granted, but the idea of transferring 
plants to definite locations, of cultivating 
flowers for scent or looks requires fore- 
sight and ingenuity. According to many 
authorities on landscape architecture, 
including the distinguished Mr. John 
MacLaren, there are only two people who 
have evolved the cultivated gardens, the 
Chinese and the Palestines. 

The Palestine gardens are formal in 
arrangement, characterized by orderly 
layouts, symmetrically arranged flower 
beds, round or rectangular pools, straight 
or curved paths, level topped garden 
walls or hedges, and fountains. This 
type spreads over the entire near East, 
and may be found in India (the Taj 
Mahal garden, for example), Babylonia 
(hanging gardens) and Persia. The 
Persian garden idea was carried to Spain 
by the Moors and spread over much of 
Europe, including France. 

The Chinese garden is an informal 
one, being characterized by "admirable 
disorder". Paths are made to twist and 
turn, flower beds are scattered or broken 
by rockeries, pools are natural, bridges 
are made to zig-zag or arch into "camel 
back" (such as the one at the Japanese 
Tea Garden, Golden Gate Park) ; tops 
of walls are stepped where the ground 
is rolling; and walls are pierced by moon- 
shaped or ball-shaped openings, generally 
framing a pleasant view. Water cascades 
from tops of miniature mountains 
through winding brooks to a pond stock- 
ed with lilies and goldfish. Pavilions 
are built for birds and for tea or medi- 
tation, generally where one can overlook 
his garden as a world in miniature. The 
Chinese garden idea was carried to Eng- 
land where it won great popularity. 

Flower calendars were worked out so 
that different plants bloomed in succes- 



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Remember When? 



Remember when the young bloods of 
Chinatown used to go horseback riding 
— right through Grant Avenue? 

The early Chinese immigrants were 
wanderlusts, and radiated in all directions 
almost as soon as they landed, reaching 
the Mexican border, Colorado, Montana, 
and points north. There were many in- 
stances of poor laborers hiking to Marys- 
ville, Sacramento, and Fresno. This 
spread was stopped with the rise of the 
labor agitation, and after that was over, 
it was the second generation which did 
most of the wandering. 

After the fire of 1906, bicycling to 
Palo Alto or San Jose was a favorite pas- 
time. But on Chinese New Year, when 
money was plentiful, the youngsters 
would bicycle out to riding academies, 
hire horses for $3.00 per day, and ride 
back to Chinatown — galloping through 
Grant Avenue "Cowboy fashion." The 
more imaginative of them would sport 
sombreroes, leather gloves, brass studded 
belts, and bandanas. The elders would 
look on, shaking their head with the 
comment, "san fun meng", which is the 
Chinese equivalent of "one foot in the 
grave". 

The horse and buggy was another fa- 
vorite means of locomotion, and they 
rented them for $5.00 a day. With them 



sion. Some of the cultivated flowers in- 
clude the forsythia, peony, magnolia, tea 
roses, and chrysanthemum. According 
to some writers, China furnished two- 
thirds of all the cultivated flowers in use 
in the West today. The Chinese do not 
like to cut flowers, so many flowering 
plants are placed in pots embedded in 
the garden so that they may also be taken 
indoors, if desired. Flower festivals and 
flower shows are arranged annually, fea- 
turing flower poems and flower plays. 
(Those interested in this aspect of garden 
should read Nora Wain's "Notes From 
My Chinese Flower Diary", Atlantic 
Monthly, 1934; also Herbert Wilson's 
"China Mother of Gardens".) 

Some Chinese cultivated the "flower- 
less garden" — the first cacti and herb 
gardens. Here, grotesque rockeries, grot- 
tos, crags, and sculptured stones serve 
as background for evergreens, dwarfed 
trees (which won great favor in Japan), 
fragrant herbs, and cacti. Brightly col- 
ored pottery figures and lanterns serve as 
reliefs. Flowerless gardens are especially 
popular among "poor scholars" who 
"hardly have time to sweep their studio". 
Advertisers — They Help to Ma\e This a Bigger and 



they roamed the city, entering even the 
North iBeach District where a "Sino-Da- 
go" feud was raging. The families, too, 
often visited Golden Gate Park or the 
Cliff House with a hired "kwan yin chee" 
— horse drawn sedan, horses and driver 
correctly attired, top hat and all. The 
whip, a five foot affair, was always flour- 
ished gracefully in the air, before it 
lightly descended on the horses — as if 
to flit off a fly. At the park, the favorite 
lunch which they would take out con- 
sisted of barbequed duck, layer bread, 
banana, oranges, tea — and chocolate 
eclairs. 



Remember when we had shoe factories 
in Chinatown? and you can get custom 
made shoes for as low as $3.00 a pair? 

At one time, the Chinese dominated 
the shoe industry of California, and at 
the height of the boom, more than 5,000 
men were said to be in the business. They 
operated machineries sent over from the 
Eastern coast, supplemented by handwork 
in parts, for the machineries were still 
in their infancy. Later, the unions, by 
agitation and legislation, forced the busi- 
ness out of Chinese hands. Nevertheless, 
some managed to maintain factories to 
meet the Chinese demand. 

After the fire of 1906 shoe factories 
were located at 937 Stockton Street, 949 
Stockton Street, 742 Washington Street, 
(all two storied factories), and 902 Stock- 
ton Street. With the decline of the Chi- 
nese population in California these fac- 
ories finally degenerated into repair shops. 
The last one closed its door about five 
years ago. 

Besides the regular shoes, these factor- 
ies featured the "half boot". These shoes 
had an elastic web on each side, thus 
dispensing with lace or buttons. They 
were extremely durable, and being cus- 
tom made, form fitting as well. But the 
younger generation was becoming "style 
conscious" and flocked to Broadway or 
Kearny Street where Al Levy or Tony 
were selling "American Style" patent 
leather, pointed toe ("New York Cut") 
shoes. 

• • 



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Page 10 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 21,1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



Chinese Registration During 
Recent Years 

It is surprising how frequently we are 
ready to denounce others for discrimina- 
tion against us, while we sit back doing 
nothing constructive about it. We rebel 
against unfair legislation, yet when elec- 
tion time arrives, only one fourth of 
those eligible to vote take advantage of 
the privilege. 

By exercising this privilege of voting, 
we hold in our hands a powerful weapon 
to wield for the protection of our rights. 
Through greater control of the polls we 
are able to put into effect our community 
planning. To ask for social reform, we 
as a community must make our demands 
heard. 

Fortunately, during the last five years, 
the Chinese of this city are showing an 
increased interest in elections. Figures 
released from the office of the Registrar 
of Voters seem to substantiate this opin- 
ion. The graph below pictures the rise 
of Chinese registration from 1926 to 1935: 




n» , /?« mo H33. mt /fay 



No doubt the country's economic con- 
ditions, giving rise to issues of major 
importance, affecting the Chinese as well 
as the general populace, were provoca- 
tive of such stimulated interest. At least 
it is apparent that since 1930, the total 
Chinese registration has grown to more 
than twice its size. 

During the last civic election of 1935, 
Chinatown witnessed an incessant amount 
of campaign activities. Special campaign 
quarters of the various political parties 
were set up in the Chinese community. 

The numerous campaign rallies, meet- 
ings, social gatherings, bore evidence of 



Registration As the First Step 
to Exercise of the Franchise 

By Kenneth Y. Fung 
(Executive Secretary, C. A. C. A.) 
American citizenship carries with it 
duties and responsibilities, not the least 
of which is the exercise of the franchise. 
The first step in the exercise of this pre- 
cious attribute of citizenship is for the 
citizens to register. Under a new law 
passed by the California legislature in 
1935, every citizen wishing to vote must 
register anew, regardless of previous re- 
gistrations, and the enrollment for the 
May presidential primary election will 
close on March 26. 

Our rights and privileges are preserved 
and our government perpetuated only 
through the ballot. And yet, sad to 
relate, there is a woeful lack of interest 
in our elections. A great wave of protest 
and indignant expostulation will certainly 
be set up if some morning we should 
awake to find that the right to vote is 
denied us. Yet a majority of the citizens 
fail to exercise the right to vote while 
they hold the reins of power in the man- 
agement of their government. 

In British Columbia the Canadian- 
born Chinese are denied the right to 
franchise, granted in every other province 
of the Dominion. They are also pro- 
hibited from practicing law or pharmacy. 
While they are Canadian nationals, en- 
titled to protection from the government, 
they are not citizens in the full sense of 
the word. On the other hand we find 
the fullest exercise of the franchise by 
the Oriental citizens in the Hawaiian 
Islands where the Oriental vote is the 
controlling factor. Candidates running 
for public offices find to their advantage 
the necessity to give full recognition to 
the voting strength of these Americans 
of Oriental descent. Besides being "vote 
minded" we find that many Hawaiian- 
born Chinese offered themselves as can- 
didates for public offices in the territorial 
and county governments with 18 success- 
ful out of 34 candidates in the 1934 
elections. 

the people's concern in the election. 

It is estimated that in San Francisco, 
there are about 5,000 Chinese eligible 
to vote; whereas at the last election only 
1700 registered and about 1200 actually 
voted. To the remaining 3,000 odd 
American-born Chinese is extended an 
earnest appeal to register for and parti- 
cipate in the coming election. 



VITAL STATISTICS 
BIRTHS 

A son was born on Feb. 3, to the wife 
of Lim Chee Tai, 822 26th St., Oakland. 
The baby was named Donald Gum Tung 
Lim. 



A son was born on Feb. 5, to the wife 
of Harry Wong, 900 Jackson Street, San 
Francisco. 

A son was born on Feb. 9, to the wife 
of Yee Wing, 762 Sacramento Street, San 
Francisco. 



A daughter was born on Feb. 2 to the 
wife of Chong Poon, 617 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 



A daughter was born on Feb. 8 to the 
wife of Choy Ming Fay, 666 Commercial 
St., San Francisco. 



A daughter was born on Feb. 1, to the 
wife of Lee Gin, 434 Jackson St., San 
Francisco. 



A daughter was born on Feb. 1 to the 
wife of Tze Mon Bow, 610 Webster St.. 
Oakland. 



A son was born on Feb. 6 to the wife 
of Chu Chung Tsun, 1013 Powell St., 
San Francisco. 



A daughter was born on Feb. 2 to 
the wife of Yee Hue Woon. 44 SpofFord. 
San Francisco. 



Great benefits can be had in the form 
of community improvement whenever 
reasonable appeals and suggestions are 
presented to our city fathers by citizens 
who are wise enough to unite their votes 
for a common purpose. This has been 
demonstrated time and again particularly 
with reference to San Francisco's China- 
town. We can make known our needs 
and our approval or disapproval of the 
administration policy only through our 
ballots. The government always reflects 
the character of the men who rule. These 
men are of our own choosing and when 
we exercise our votes wisely, electing men 
to office who understand our needs and are 
willing to meet them, we shall be a much 
happier and better people. The Ameri- 
can citizens of Chinese descent can best 
serve their community by the exercise 
of the franchise the first step of which 
is to register. 



Friday, February 21, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 11 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY. 



CHANGE IN CHINA 

"The thought and action of millions 
of people in various parts of China are 
being affected today by new concepts of 
government, new methods of engineer- 
ing, new and more constructive applica- 
tion of tax receipts formerly frittered on 
makeshift and nonconstructive, if not 
downright dishonest outlets — including 
official pockets." 

The words are quoted from a recent 
article by one of the most competent and 
able American journalists now in China. 
If a sympathetic insight is the first re- 
quisite of a good newspaper man, then 
certainly Randall Gould fulfills that func- 
tion admirably — something which one 
cannot say of every foreign newspaper 
man in China. He has spent quite a 
few years in China now, but he is not 
disillusioned by some of the disintegrat- 
ing forces undermining the country's 
struggle to achieve democracy — both po- 
litically and socially undesirable forces. 
He has sympathy, understanding, and a 
clear perspective; and he has a long 
range view, which is about the only true 
way of appreciating China's slow changes 
and progress. 

Mr. Gould reports many new evidences 
of China's progress; of how primary edu- 
cation "is being administered in recently 
battle-racked Kiangsi province" and in 
the Yangtze uplands; of the building of 
a railway in Central China so that it may 
bring cheap coal from a nearby mining 
district to another area, to millions of 
people who have "for all recorded time 
been compelled to pull the grass off their 
hillsides and burn it for fuel, because 
they had no other fuel"; and of how, in 
another place, the people have been 
taught to grow other products besides 
those they have been growing for cen- 
turies, this as a measure of famine con- 
trol. 

Mr. Gould tells also of how in many 
Central China areas the government and 
missionary organizations are actively 
promoting agricultural experimentation 
to make the soil produce more abun- 
dantly. 

China has for centuries been a land of 
floods and famine. To control the 
scourge of drought the "China Interna- 
tional Famine Relief Commission has 
been aiding man in his war with nature 
in such fashion as to change the whole 
face of the landscape. Irrigation projects 
in the Northwestern areas .... have 
given hope for water in dry years and 

Patronize Our 



will permit extensive migration out of 
the more congested districts if the work 
can be kept up and extended. 

" . . . . At the scene of the latest break 
of the Yellow River, 'China's Sorrows', 
with a threat of catastrophe stretching 
through parts of Honan and Shantung 
provinces and northward along the Grand 
Canal's course to Tientsin, professional 
dike workers recently insisted upon at 
least the initial trial of antiquated me- 
thods which were more designed to give 
lasting employment to the workers than 
an effective check to the river flow. E- 
ventually the more modern school of 
thought prevailed and lasting stonework 
took the place of woven reed mats and 
mud in closing the river gap. . . . Ex- 
pert engineers feel that, in spite of the 
obstacles, it is possible to tame even the 
Yellow River — a step which would change 
the life and thought of millions who now 
live in the constant shadow of a horrible 
menace." 

Mr. Gould adds that "changes such as 
these are definitely in the slow motion 
category. We have in China no spectac- 
ular development of large-scale farming 
with tractors, as in the Soviet collectives, 
for example. There is little drama in 
the changes which come in China, little 
in the way of mass action, but neverthe- 
less much of the change through test 
and example is highly convincing to the 
Chinese temperament." 

Certainly to deny that China is not 
progressing is to utter a falsehood. 
Through the eyes of capable reporters 
like Randall Gould one can see that 
immense progress has been made in 
China — progress which will make for the 
benefit and happiness of her four hun- 
dred millions. 

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tain the people's patriotism. They en- 
shrine the Emperor as a divine figure; 
they worship shrines and monuments to 
military heroes for the nation's worship; 
and they preach Wang-tao — the Way of 
the Kings. 

When the common people of a nation 
is hungry and tax-ridden, patriotism is 
bound to be at low ebb. Japan's people 
is poor — miserably so; therefore, while 
the military is attempting conquests in 
the mainland of Asia, artificial means 
are used at home to stimulate their love 
for their country so that no internal re- 
volution of any sort may arise. 

Propaganda is a marvelous instrument 
and the Japanese military have learned 
to wield it effectively. 

One of the means employed to keep 
patriotism burning at home was recently 
revealed. It is at once simple and subtle. 
Japanese merchants are using wrapping 
papers on which a cartoon or picture has 
been printed thereon which depicts a 
soldier and a marine wrapping up the 
world with the Japanese flag. At the 
top of the picture is a caption in Japan- 
ese characters which read: "The Japan- 
ese flag will envelop the world." 

Some may call such a method of pro- 
paganda as downright silly; but in Japan 
its effectiveness and ability to "deliver 
the goods" is beyond question. 

"MYSTERIOUS 
CHINATOWN" 

Some people have often wondered how 
distorted notions and false ideas about 
the customs and habits of our brethren 
who dwell in these United States are be- 
ing kept alive in this age of enlightened 
minds. Books, the motion picture, and 
certain pulp magazines seem to be the 
triumvirate of culprits on which most of 
the blame fall. But it seems that we 
have overlooked a fourth malefactor — 
the lecturer-guide in certain cities in the 
East. 

The lecturer-guide is known in the 
trade as a spieler. His imagination is 
boundless and his speech is as melodram- 
atic as the cinema 'trailers' you see at 
your local theatres. A recent article 
gives this picture of the spieler as he 
leads his coterie of tourists through New 
York's Chinatown on an evening: 

"Chinatown is still an area filled with 
Oriental awe and mystery, as far as the 
spieler is concerned, even though the 
Chinese today have adopted ultra-modern 
cuts in their suitings and are, for the 
most part, quiet men and women who 

(Continued on Page 14) 
Better Paper 



Page 12 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 21,1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo- 



Ah Wing Lee 



An effort is being made now to get 
Ah Wing Lee, Chinese boxer who retired 
in 1934, to make a comeback in the ring. 
He is still as popular with his friends 
and boxing fans as when he was one of 
the best 137 pounders in the Pacific 
Northwest. 

Ah Wing Lee, whose birth name is 
James Jower, was born in St. Johns, Ore- 
gon, and attended public and high school 
there, where he gained the respect and 
admiration of his fellow students for his 
good fellowship and athletic ability. He 
was especially proficient in boxing and 
football. Ah Wing also attended the 
University of Oregon. 

While he was studying at Oregon U. 
his boxing as an amateur attracted a ring 
promoter's attention. Ah Wing was in- 
duced to take up professional fighting. 
He fought under the name "Jimmy Lee" 
for two years or so, with more or less 
success as a preliminary boxer, until one 
night in Seattle when he impressed Joe 
Waterman with his punching ability. 
Waterman had his name changed to "Ah 
Wing Lee" and began steering him to 
success. Winning many fights by knock- 
outs, he became a sensation. Possessing 
a terrific left, he became the greatest box- 
office attraction in Portland. 

Fought Peter Jackson 
In July, 1933, he was matched with 
Young Peter Jackson, present California 
lightweight champion, before almost 
16,000 spectators, the second largest 
crowd in Portland's ring history (Jack 
Dempsey holds the record) . Ah Wing 
Lee was kayoed in the fourth round after 
he had almost knocked out Jackson with 
a left hand punch. Before this fight, he 
was reported operated on for hernia, and 
he probably lost on account of the mental 
hazard. 

Among the top-notchers whom he 
fought were Goldie Hess, Eddie Mack, 
Santiago Zorrilla, Suzio Hirkawa, and 
others. Ah Wing Lee's last appearance 
was in February, 1934, when he lost a 
decision to Ernie Cavelli. He is now 27 
years of age and married to a Portland 
Chinese girl. Ah Wing is of a retiring 
nature, quiet and unassuming, intelligent 
and refined, according to Ed Byerlee, 
auditor of the Portland Municipal Box- 
ing Commission, who has known him 
since he was a wee tot. 




NORTHWESTERN CHAMPIONS L. A. TENNIS CLUB 

The former "queen" of the Los An- 
geles Chinese Tennis Club, Miss Ruth 
Kim, was elected president of the club 
at a recent meeting. She replaced Dr. 
Edward Lee, who has faithfully served 
the Tennis Club since its birth in March, 
1934. 

Other officers are George Chan, vice- 
president; Thomas S. Wong, treasurer; 
and Elsie Lee, secretary. Hamilton Gee, 
No. 1 men's single of the club was un- 
animously elected manager. Represen- 
tatives to the Municipal Tennis Associa- 
tion are Manager Gee and Andrew Jue, 
founder of the club and former tennis 
manager. The two alternatives are Dr. 
Edward Lee and Milton Quon. 

For the first time in the history of 
local tennis, two Chinese players entered 
the Los Angeles Metropolitan Tennis 
Championship Tournament. They were 
Gee and Jue representing the club in 
singles. 

Fortunately for the players of the club, 
a new resolution was passed that the club 
will furnish the balls for all inter-club 
matches. 



University of Washington Chinese 
Cagers, recently crowned champions of 
the Pacific Northwest Chinese Basketball 
Tournament. Reading from left to right: 
Front row — Albert Wong, Herbert Wong 
and Frank Nipp. Back row — Edwin 
Luke, Henry Luke, Kaye Hong, Tom 
Hong and James Luke. 
• • 

High Winds — Low Scores 

With a high wind prevailing all day, 
the Chinese Sportsmen Club held its se- 
cond annual Trap Shoot at the Golden 
Gate Gun Club in Alameda on Sunday, 
Feb. 16. Many Chinese from San Fran- 
cisco and the East Bay attended. 

The scores were considerably lower 
than average on account of the high 
winds. The Lindemann Perpetual Tro- 
phy and the Golden Gate Gun Club 
Trophy were won by George Lee, who 
used high power shells. Henry Lum and 
Dr. D. K. Chang were right behind him 
in the scores. 

Clayton SooHoo, son of Mack, was the 
greatest surprise of the day. The eleven- 
yea'r old boy walked away with the all- 
high gun, thus winning the Chinese 
Sportsmen Club Gun Trophy. 

It is customary for the second and 
third guns to challenge the club champ. 
Such a challenge has been filed, with Dr. 
Chang and Lum against George Lee, the 
present title-holder. The shoot will take 
place at the Towns Gun Club at South 
San Francisco on Mar. 1, at 11 a. m. 
All gun followers are invited to witness 
this "grudge" match with real fireworks 
and marksmanship in the offing. No 
admission will be charged, the party 
leaving at 11 a. m. from the clubhouse 
at 156 Waverly Place. 



Commerce Hi Chinese 
Athletes 

When one looks at the list of Chinese 
who are out for the school teams at 
Commerce High, one would probably 
think that it was a Chinese club. Scores 
of boys went out for sports last term, 
besides the ones who are on spring term 
teams, according to Mr. Harold Brillhart. 
a school physical director. 

Five Chinese youths were on the 120 
lb. casaba team last fall; they were: Ern- 
est Leong, Morris Lee, Ebert Chan, 
Charles Louie, and Henry Chew. On 
the tens were Peter Chong, Johnson Lee, 
and Fred Wong. Henry Chew is also 
a member of the swimming squad. 

• • 

CHAN YINGS RALLY TO WIN 

Trailing by nine points, 25-16. at the 
end of the third quarter, Coach Richard 
Ong's Chan Ying cagemen rallied "Mrr- 
riwell-fashion" to eke out a 51-30 
over the local Central Y. M. C. A. 1 10- 
lb. basketeers, last Saturday, at the "Y" 
gym- 
Charles Louie and Henry Won.- 
the Chan Yings' main factors in 
up-hill battle win. 



Friday, February 21, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 13 




L. A. Chinese Cong 
Trounces Japanese 

The Chinese Congregational Church 
basketball team of Los Angeles won its 
fourth straight contest last week with a 
lop-sided victory over the Japanese Aggies 
of Alhambra, by a score of 41-28. So 
far, all wins scored have been registered 
against Japanese aggregations. Games 
are being scheduled against Korean and 
American teams in the near future. 

George Wong, formerly of the local 
Nanwah Club, is captain of the team, 
which was organized recently. The fol- 
lowing boys are members of the quintet: 
Milton Quon, Harry Leong, Eddie Le- 
ong, Andy Wong, Paul Chuck, Henry 
Lee, William Lee, Roland, Archie and 
Bill Got, and the Young brothers, Bud, 
Clarence and Warren. 

• • 

Salinas Chinese Defeat 
Monterey 

Salinas Chinese Boys Club's quintet 
scored another victory by defeating the 
Monterey Chinese at the latter's home 
court last week. Final count was 27-17. 

Frank Chin collected eleven points to 
lead the scoring for the winners, followed 
by Diamond Yee with eight. George 
Wong, Tommy Jung and Gage Wong, Jr. 
starred also, turning in an all-around 
game. For Monterey, Tommy Gee was 
high scorer with seven, while Howard 
and Ed Low were great on defense. Half 
time tally favored Salinas, 17-8. 

• • 

CHINESE TAKE PART 
IN HONOLULU SWIM 

In the swimming meet sponsored by 
the Honolulu Central Y. M. C. A. two 
weeks ago, many Chinese boys partici- 
pated in the events. Among those who 
took part were: Wah Jan Chong, Ray- 
mond Wong, Jim Lum, Reginald Lum, 
George Nip, Al Hong, Richard Loo, and 
Liko Pang in the hundred yards breast- 
stroke; Peter Kim, 'Bunny Wong, John 
Chong, Richard Quon, Philip Wong, 
Harry Siu and Charles Luke in the 50 
yards breastroke; and David Char and 
Albert Chock in the 50 yards freestyle. 



SPORTS SHORTS 

Recently in Connecticut, two basketball 
teams played a game on mule back, with 
the mules wearing rubber shoes. One 
team rode on brown mules, the other, 
white ones. Must be a lot of fun. Let's 
try it sometime. 



Kaye Hong, who attends the University 
of Washington, formerly played basket- 
ball on the University of Idaho Frosh 
quintet. 



The Y. M. C. A. 100-lb. J. A. F. team 
meets the Columbia Park Boys' Club on 
Feb. 25 at the San Francisco Boys' Club 
gym. 

Tom Hong, stellar guard of the Uni- 
versity of Washington Chinese hoop team, 
was a star player at the Pocatello High 
School. 



Art Kim and Sonny Lee are star bas- 
ketball players for the Matson S. S. Line 
in Honolulu while S. B. Kim and S. S. 
Kim are regulars on the Honolulu Hale 
five. 



Follow the crowd on Saturday evening, 
Feb. 29, and you will have a good time. 
The Wah Ying Award Dance will be held 
that night at the Trianon Ballroom, with 
presentation of awards for the recent 
basketball tournament conducted by the 
club. 



We are glad to note that a Chinese 
boy is out for baseball at a local high 
school. Joe Chan is the boy. He is a 
graduate of Francisco Jr. High and form- 
erly attended the Yuba City High School, 
at present studying at Commerce High. 



Troop Three Hundreds defeated the 
Telegraph Hill branch of the San Fran- 
cisco Boys' Club in a J. A. F. contest last 
week, 29-8. Star for the winners was 
Ulysses Moy. 



The St. Mary's Athletic Club is desir- 
ous of scheduling a few basketball games 
for its teams, ranging from 90 to 130 
pounds, which were recently organized. 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Van Wormer 8C Rodrigues, Inc. 

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Club Pins and Rings 

Trophies and Medals 

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San Francisco 



Vallejo Loses Stars 
Thru Graduation 

Vallejo High School lost one of its 
finest athletes when Woodrow Louie grad- 
uated three weeks ago. Other stars who 
also graduated included Leslie Fong. 
Louie, all-conference end on the foot- 
ball squad, besides playing three years 
on the basketball varsity, finished his 
prep career with acclaim. Prior to his 
graduation, Louie helped the Apache 
cagers win fourteen games in a row. 

Commenting on his ability, a sports 
writer of the Vallejo Times-Herald stated, 
"His loss dealt the team a severe blow. 
Whenever he was in the game he had a 
steadying influence on the squad because 
of his coolness. It will be a long time 
before Coach Kilby finds another Chi- 
nese athlete as great as Louie." 

Another keen loss was Leslie Fong, who 
starred in both basketball and football. 

Fong is at present taking post-graduate 
studies preparatory to entering U. C. 
next fall. Louie will leave shortly for 
Alameda to take up aviation at the Boe- 
ing School. 

Lowell Track Candidates 

Seven Chinese boys are strong candi- 
dates for the track team at the local 
Lowell High School. Under the coach- 
ing of Mr. Elmer Harris, the boys are 
coming along in great shape. Out for 
the broad jump are William Chinn and 
Ulysses Moy, while Herbert Lee is trying 
out in the high jump. Four boys, Jonah 
Li, John Leong, George Lum and Martin 
Joe are aspiring to be sprinters. 

Coach Harris stated, "I find that Chi- 
nese boys are excellent competitors and 
I only wish that I had a few more of them 
on my teams." 

Shangtai Wallops Columbia 

With Allen Lee Po and John Wong 
sinking 'em from every angle of the floor, 
the Shangtai 130-lb. hoopsters trimmed 
the Columbia Park Boys' Club in a PA. 
A. tilt last Friday at Kezar Pavilion. Final 
score was 52-40. Po tallied twenty-five 
points and Wong fourteen. 

The Park Boys were champions of the 
120-lb. division last year in the P. A. A. 
competition. With practically the entire 
team intact from last year in this game, 
they failed to press the Chinese hard, 
Shangtai leading all the way from start 
to finish. This victory established the 
Chinese quintet as one of the leading 
aspirants for the title. 



Page 14 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday, February 21,1936 



Chinese Golf Club 
in Tournament 

The Chinese Golf Club of San Fran- 
cisco will be seen in action at Lincoln 
Park this Sunday morning, Feb. 23, par- 
ticipating in the the City Golf Champion- 
ship Tournament. The Chinese players 
are all in one flight, the winner of which 
will receive trophies donated by the Em- 
porium and prominent Chinese. 

Following are the members of the Chi- 
nese Golf Club: Dr. James H. Hall, C. 
C. Wing, Dr. Thomas Wong, Thomas 
Leong, William Law, Chan B. Yat, Ge- 
orge Jue, Charlie Low, Glenn Lym, 
Thomas Kwan, B. K. Chan, Dr. Theo- 
dore Lee and Dr. Collin Dong, all of 
whom have been practicing hard for 
the tourney. 

Anyone who is interested in the game 
is invited to join the club. 
• • 

SPORTS SHORTS— 

Faye Lowe, who played on the Mission 
High 120-lb. basketball team last fall, 
is out for tennis at the Mission district 
school. 

Faye bids fair to be one of its ranking 
players, as we recollect that, during past 
years, Billy Louie, Thomas Dare and 
Arthur Lum, who is a ranking collegiate 
player in China at present, were top- 
notch netsters at Mission. 



Tom Sing, veteran letterman of Gar- 
field High School of Seattle, Washing- 
ton, is limbering his arm in preparation 
for the coming season. Tom is the first 
Chinese to ever chuck 'em for a hi team 
up north. 



Pershing Wong, second-string quarter- 
back on last year's Garfield Hi frosh 
eleven, Seattle, is already training for 
next season for varsity work. He's eating 
a lot of rice in an effort to increase his 
weight, but to no avail, observers declare. 



POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



Seen at the YMD Valentine Dance. 
To dubs like me, dancing is a full time 
job. But I saw an expert dance, why I 
say expert is because he was dancing and 
eating ice cream at the same time. Well 
'Rosy Cheeks' you win the cake. (Tnat 
ought to go good so the next time you 
could eat ice cream and cake, too.) 



A double cross is an act frowned upon 
by all. To witness one performed per- 
fectly is a rare treat. For want of better 
names shall I call the first 'Shorty', his 
pal 'Longy', and the other person 'Won? 
'Shorty' was dancing a tag dance, in fact 
he had just started, when no sooner had 
he gone two steps, than he was tagged 
by 'Won'. Ired by this, 'Shor:y' called 
his pal (?) 'Longy' and had him tag 
'Won'. After 'Longy' tagged Won, 
Shorty promptly tagged Longy. To 
Shorty's consternation, Longy refused to 
relinquish his partner. That, my friend, 
is the perfect double-cross. 

— At the Yoke Choy Dance — 

The members of the Yoke Choy Club 
took advantage of Leap Year and danced 
with the SUPPORT of the girls. It 
seemed that the most popular place in 
St. Francis Hotel was not in the Italian 
room, but the French room (where the 
bar was) . 

In the next room, the YMI were hold- 
ing a dance, and naturally they wandered 
over and looked in the door. They were 
at a loss as to who was giving this dance 
until .... Miss Marian K. Dong danced 
by, then the remark was heard that it 
must be her WEDDING party. The 
reason for this assertion was that she 
wore a white veil with her gown. 

• • 

CHINESE HURT BY AUTO 

Careless driving was blamed for an 
injury suffered by Chan Poon, 41, 925 
Grant Avenue, last Sunday evening at 



Although defeated for the J. A. F. 
championship, the "Y" 100-lb. cage team 

was one of the best lightweight squads Market an <* Fi«t Streets. As Chan stepped 
in the tourney. The players were ably from a street car - he was knocked down 



coached by two former Commerce High 
star hoopsters, Louie Fay and William 
Wong. 



by an automobile. He was treated for 
head and possible internal injuries, at 
the emergency hospital. The driver, an 
Oakland man, who claimed that the vic- 
tim stepped into the path of his car. was 
held by police for careless driving. 



Following up its policy of being an 
active club, the S. F. J. C. Chinese bas- 
ketball team plays the Chinese "Y" 145- • • 
lb. quintet at the "Y" gym tonight, Henry Whoe is trying for track at 
according to Paul Mark, athletic mana- High School of Comr.erce, going out 
ger. Admission free. for the 130-lb high jump. 

Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Mal^e This a Bigger 



FAREWELL DINNER 

Beal Wong, hero of the film, "Heart- 
aches," was tendered a farewell banquet 
by Norman Leong at his home on Jack- 
son Street, Monday evening. 

Among the guests were: Mr. and Mrs. 
Bill Tong, Mrs. Edward Lee, Misses Vio- 
let Tong, Rose Leong, Mable Leong, and 
Messrs. Robert Chan, William. Won and 
Bill Young of Los Angeles. 

Beal and his brother, Bruce, who is 
one of the producers of the picture, re- 
turned to Los Angeles with the rest of 
he cast. 

• • 
"Mysterious Chinatown" 



(Continued from Page 11) 
differ from other New Yorkers only in 
the color of their skins. 

"The lecturer-guide, as he leads his 
queue of visitors through the crooked 
lanes, indicates by the very manner of 
his voice that the group is in danger every 
step of the way. He warns them to watc.) 
their purses and pocke:books as if pi 
pockets swarm the street. The visitors 
are thrilled and even a little scared. They 
throw fearful glances back over their 
shoulders as they hurry on, and miss 
half the patter of the guide." 

Having established the desired psy- 
chological effect on his customers the 
spieler then shows them the Joss house, 
the Chinatown postoffice, and "down the 
creaky stairs to the basement to stare at 
the marks of the gloomy walls where 
the opium smokers' bunks used to be." 

Thus are distorted ideas of the Chinese 
kept alive. It seems that fiction, being 
stranger than fact, is more captivating 
to the imagination. The tragedy of it 
is that such fiction is dangerous because 
it perpetuates ignorance and prejudice. 

• • 

Howard Ho, former Nulite basketball 
player, performs for the Shangtai quin- 
tet these days. 

• • 



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Friday, February 21, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



Pig* 15 



Drive Still On Against 
Opium 

A year and a half have passed since 
General Chiang Kai-shek announced his 
intention to conquer by 1940 China's 
opium evil. With the six-year program 
but little less than one-third gone, seven 
out of the twenty-four Chinese provinces 
are reported officially free from produc- 
tion of this drug. 

Hundreds of people have faced firing 
squads and many thrown into prisons for 
failure to observe opium regulations. Na- 
tional authorities are .hopeful that the 
year 1940 will see the end of the opium 
traffic and complete suppression of pro- 
duction and consumption. 

LOUIE SAILS 

Louie Wong, a prominent member of 
the Oakland Chinese Youth Circle, will 
sail for China today on board the S. S. 
President Coolidge. 

Members and friends tendered a fare- 
well and bon voyage party in his honor 
Wednesday at the Oakland Peking Low, 
with dancing, dinner and speeches, the 
features for the evening. 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Taft (San Francisco) 
Mar. 3; President McKinley (Seattle) 
Mar. 4; President Hoover (San Francisco) 
Mar. 11; President Grant (Seattle) Mar. 
18; President Pierce (San Francisco) 
Mar. 31; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Apr. 1. President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Apr. 8; President Jackson (Se- 
attle) Apr. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Apr. 28; President McKinley 
(Seattle) Apr. 29. 
SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Harrison (San 
Francisco) Feb. 28; President Jackson 
(Seattle) Feb. 29; President Lincoln 
(San Francisco) Mar. 6; President Hayes 
(San Francisco) Mar. 13. President Mc- 
Kinley (Seattle) Mar. 14; President Hoo- 
ver (San Francisco) Mar. 20; President 
Wilson (San Francisco) Mar. 27; Presi- 
dent Grant (Seattle) Mar. 28. 



Convictions in 
Embezzlement Case 

For embezzlement in connection with 
the affairs of the defunct American Or- 
iental Finance Corporation, Frank J. 
Raven, formerly of San Jose and Hono- 
lulu, and J. Warner Brown, formerly of 
Kansas City and Marshall, Mo., were 
found guilty recently in a United States 
court in Shanghai. 

Following a long and bitter trial, the 
two men were convicted on seven counts. 
The Raven Corporations collapsed on 
May 24, 1935, with a loss of millions of 
dollars to investors and depositors, 
throughout the Far East. Raven, presi- 
dent of the American Oriental Finance 
Corporation, and Brown, vice-president, 
indicated that they intended to appeal. 
Charges against a third defendant, Alfred 
Driscoll, secretary and treasurer, were 
dropped. 

• • 

JAPANESE GIRL PIRATE CAUGHT 

After several years of terrorizing the 
South China coast, Sue Nakawura, Jap- 
anese school teacher who turned pirate, 
was caught recently in Foochow by police 
and deported to Japan. A huge fortune 
had been amassed by the woman. 

• • 

U. S. PURCHASES FIFTY 
MILLION OUNCES OF SILVER 

Purchase of 50,000,000 ounces of Chi- 
nese silver by the Treasury of the United 
States was viewed in Shanghai's financial 
quarters as an effort on the part of 
America to repair the serious economic 
damages wrought upon China by the 
American silver policy. 

It was believed that the United States 
is disturbed over the increasing British 
influence in Chinese financial circles, be- 
lieving that Great Britain is doing her 
utmost to sabotage the American plan to 
restore silver to its place in the monetary 
firmament. 

• • 
REDS CRUSHED 

An announcement was issued last week 
by the National government military field 
headquarters in Kweiyan, Kweichow pro- 
vince, China, that its troops scored a 
crushing victory over the Communists in 
southwest Szechuen province, with the 
assistance of Szechuen provincial militia. 
1,000 reds were reported killed in the 
battle. 



MRS. KAI-KEE PASSES AWAY 

Funeral services for Mow See Kai-Kee, 
widow of the late Hin Gim Kai-Kee, was 
held on the afternoon of Feb. 13 at the 
Oakland Chinese Presbyterian Church, 
with interment at the Mt. View Cemetery. 

Mrs. Kai, who was sixty-three years of 
age, passed away on Feb. 9. She was a 
native of San Francisco, and is survived 
by six children, Lock, Sam, Newell, Bessie, 

Foon and Mark Kai-Kee. 

• • 

L. A. CHINESE WAITER SHOT 

Two Filipinos and two white women 
were held for investigation by the Los 
Angeles police for the mysterious shoot- 
ing of a Chinese waiter at a local cafe. 
A pistol was found in the possession of 
one of the suspects, it was reported. 

The women reported that they were 
eating with the Filipinos at the restaur- 
ant when suddenly a shot rang out, and 
Chong, who was waiting on them, slump- 
ed to the floor. They did not see who 
fired the shot, they stated. 

• • 

Quon Kay Shone, a Chinese saleman 
employed in a Los Angeles merchandise 
store, was found dead in the bathroom 
of the store by his employer, Tom Mon 
Poon. It was reported that Quon had 
been ill for a long period. 

• • 
TSU PAN 

(Continued from Page 1) 
the American attitude toward the reten- 
tion of the "open-door" principle in 
China. 

The State Department official reviewed 
the recent American foreign policies 
and bespoke the adherence to the exist- 
ing treaties aiming at peaceful regulation 
of international relations in the Far East. 

Phillips believes that the "open-door" 
policy in China is a sound principle, and 
in spite of the fact that there have been 
situations in which his policy has been 
disregarded, "we cannot either wisely or 
consistently abandon it with regard to 
any particular area or country." 

As to the peace treaties, Phillips was 
quoted as saying that observance of their 
provisions would go far toward maintain- 
ing peace with justice in the Far East. 

• • 
"Y" DANCE SUCCESS 

Despite the rain, approximately 400 
persons attended the Boys' Work Com- 
mittee dance at the gym last Friday. Ted 
Lee's harmonica band created a sensa- 
tion. 



Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 21,1936 



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Vol. 2, No. 9 



February 28, 1936 



Five Cents 



CURRENT NEWS ABOUT CHINA 



By Tsu Pan 



• CHINESE ANALYZE JAPAN'S MADNESS 

Chinese observers of Far Eastern affairs pointed out 
that the Japanese militarists were prompted into their 
bloody action by growing unrest within the country. 
Chief among the factors causing uneasiness among the 
Japanese, it was observed, are the following: 

l.The success of the Liberal Minseito Party which 
gained 78 votes in the election last week, while the 
Military Seiyukai Party lost 67 votes (205 versus 175). 

2. The growing fear that the Japanese invasion into 
Mongolia, Northern China, and Siberia will add to 
the financial burden of the Japanese. 

3. The sense of insecurity as money is being drained 
from the people in return for paper money, together 
with the unbearable increase in taxation to support the 
military. 

4. The growing doubt that Japan can successfully 
compete with America and England in the naval race. 

5. The growing military strength of Nanking on the 
one hand, and the calm philosophical indifference and 
contempt with which the Chinese people meet Japanese 
threats on the other hand. 

6. The sense of guilt before the court of world opin- 
ion. The "Open Letter" of Hu Shih, which was widely 
read in Japan by the intellectuals (See March Asia, 
1936) is said to have an awakening effect on the Jap- 
anese also. 

Concerning the results of this recent coup, Far East- 
ern critics were rather pointed: 

1. Chester Rowell, famous observer on Far Eastern 
Affairs said in the San Francisco Chronicle that "There 
may be hope for harried Japan in this latest and worst 
of its military coups. If government by murder is to 
be stopped, it must be stopped now, and with it the 
national doctrine on which it is based. If it continues, 
it means national ruin. Now comes the showdown. The 
thing has gone so far this time that if it goes further 
there is no hope . . . Now the hope may be in the Em- 
peror. If he will rise to the measure of his august 
grandfather, he can save Japan." 

2. General Fang Chen-Wu, famous military leader 
now in San Francisco (who fought Japan in Shantung 
in 1928 and again in Shanghai with the 19th Route 
Army in 1932) said in part: "The happenings in Ta-- 
an at present are very unfortunate not only to Japan, 
but to the rest of the world. Japan especially can ill 
afford to lose its liberal leaders, especially by murder." 



MILITARISTS PULL ANOTHER 
"JAPANESE COUP" 



February 26th: Extreme elements in the Japanese 
army again broke out in another self-appointed attempt 
to "discipline" the liberal leaders against modern ten- 
dencies. The uprising took place at 5 o'clock in the 
morning; selected groups surrounding the habitations 
of prominent liberals, dragging out their victims, lec- 
turing to them, beating them, and finally shooting them. 
Those murdered or injured included the following: 

1. Premier Keisuke Okada, Buddha-faced, conserva- 
tively dressed leader who advised against the Naval 
Invasion of Shanghai four years ago; killed in front 
of his residence. 

2. Admiral Makato Saito, stout, heavy-eyed, elderly 
Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal. He was killed for "wish- 
ing to bring an Anglo constitution into the Emperor's 
domain". 

3. Count Makino, former Lord Keeper of the Privy 
Seal, surrounded at his hotel at Yugawara Hot Springs, 
was beaten, but was spirited away by his companions. 

4. Admiral Soroku Suzuki, bespectacled Grand Cham- 
berlain, shot in front of his residence, was left for 
dead in the snow, but was reported still living when 
taken to the hospital. 

5. Korekiyo Takahashi, elderly Westernized Minister 
of Finance, said to be tool of the industrialists, who 
favor friendly trade relations with China; shot down 
in front of his residence. 

At the same time, more than one hundred civilians^ 
including many students, teachers, and socialists were 
assassinated because they were known to have harbored 
radical views. 

Pamphlets dropped from airplanes by members of 
the notorious "Third Regiment" inform the populace 
that this bloody coup was necessary to purge the coun- 
try of weakhearted elements who would lead the Jap- 
anese nation from "the true spirit of the Samurai". 

To prevent further violence, but especially to guard 
against outbreaks on the part of liberal sympathizers, 
12,000 troops poured into Tokyo, guarding the imperial 
palaces, railroad depots, and all important public places. 
The fleet was also reported steaming toward the city. 

Meanwhile, news was suppressed by the Japanese 
government; only the most fragmentary news were per- 
mitted to leave the country. Internally, likewise, the 
Japanese people were kept in the dark. 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



OUTLINES FOR FLOOD 
PREVENTION GIVEN 

After his return from an extensive in- 
spection trip to the various river ports, 
Mr. Chen Fen, Secretary-General of the 
National Economic Council, suggested 
a set of emergency measures to cope 
with the present flood situation along 
the Yangtze River. 

Firstly, Mr. Chen said, it is important 
that the various provincial governments 
should direct the local officials and in- 
habitants to work together in flood pre- 
vention. It is advisable that high gov- 
ernment officials should make frequent 
inspections and give directions. This, 
according to Mr. Chen, would give im- 
petus to the present urgent task. 

Secondly, Mr. Chen said, where flow 
of water at a breach is heavy, it is not 
necessary to effect immediate repair to 
the breach but rather efforts should be 
directed to the strengthening of both 
sides of the gap. This will prevent the 
widening of the breach which may be 
repaired after the water has subsided. 

Thirdly, emergency relief should be 
given to the flood sufferers in accord- 
ance with the measures recently announc- 
ed by General Chiang Kai-shek, Chair- 
man of the Military Affairs Commission. 
In the meantime, especial care should be 
taken to prevent the break of epidemics. 

Fourthly, Mr. Chen continued, the lo- 
cal authorities should immediately make 
a thorough investigation of the flood 
situation in their respective areas and 
prepare reports to be submitted to the 
Yangtze Conservancy Commission as ba- 
sis for working out detailed measures 
for flood prevention. 

In addition to the above preventive 
measures, Mr. Chen also outlined the 
following set of measures for rehabilita- 
tion after the flood: 

1. As a measure to prevent further 
floods, the Yangtze River Conservancy 
Commission should work out in collabora- 
tion with the various provincial gov- 
ernments a scheme for the reserving of 
water in lakes and reservoirs. The con- 
struction of dykes and dams detrimental 
to this scheme should not be allowed. 



Deputy Consul Sun 
Proud Father 

To Deputy Consul and Mrs. Patrick 
Pichi Sun, Washington's Birthday 
brought a cooing, sweet little six pounds 
of feminine happiness. 

At the Children's Hospital, Mistress 
Patricia Frances greeted her new world. 
Congratulations are flooding the Sun 
residence and both mother and daughter 
are doing very nicely. 

Mr. Sun is well known among both the 
older and younger social set. Mrs. Sun 
is a former secretary at the Chinese 
Consulate of San Francisco. 

• • 

BAY OF CHIHLI ICE-BOUND 

With ice floes extending ten miles to 
sea, shipping officials last week were pre- 
paring to dispatch food supplies to at 
least two dozen vessels locked in the ice 
in the Bay of Chihli, according to press 
reports from Tientsin, China. An ice- 
breaker, after rescuing 100 passengers 
from a stranded ship, was itself caught 
in the ice. 

• • 
UNIVERSITY FACULTY 
IN PEIPING RESIGNS 

Countering the extensive student agi- 
tation against the term examinations, 
members of the faculty of the Tsinghua 
College resigned their positions. 68 out 
of 74 instructors turned in their resigna- 
tions. 

The Tsinghua College was established 
in Peiping through Boxer Indemnity 

funds. 



2. A careful survey of the dykes along 
the river should be made by the Yang- 
tze River Conservancy Commission. The 
various provincial governments should 
direct the local officials and inhabitants 
to repair and strengthen the dykes, and 
subsidies for this purpose may be sought 
from the Central Government when nec- 
essary. 

3. Breaches of dykes should be repaired 
under the supervision of river conser- 
vancy experts commissioned by the Yang- 
tze River Conservancy Commission. 

4. A detailed survey of the course of 
the Yangtze River and its tributaries and 
adjoining lakes should be made by river 
conservancy experts commissioned by the 
Yangtze River Conservancy Commission 
and readjustment measures should be 
worked out based upon the results the 
survey. 



PORTLAND NEWS 

Members of the Wah Kiang Club have 
taken up ice skating in earnest since the 
last few cold spells. The boys have con- 
scientiously gone up to the Ice Coliseum 
weekly to practice. Many a tumble has 
been taken, but all hope to be proficient 
at the end of the season. 



Frank Jue, Portland's renowned tenor, 
was heard at the Capitol Theatre last 
week. Mr. Jue plans to spend a short 
vacation at home with his mother before 
leaving for California. 



When the World War Veteran bonus 
starts paying, Mr. Gui D. Fong and some 
of the boys will be whooping it up with 
khaki uniforms singing the good old tune 
of Hinky, Dinky Parlee Vous. 

They say that a Packard salesman is 
marching along with him. 



In a double elimination Ping Pong 
tournament, the Moes seem to be the 
"Tops" as James Moe, William Moe, 
Warren Moe and Robert Wong enter the 
semi-final round. 



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Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Pag* 3 



CHINA TOWNIA 



Old Coin Worth Small 
Fortune 

A truck driver for a constructing com- 
pany recently found an ancient Chinese 
coin in Napa, California, during exca- 
vation work on a factory site, eighteen 
feet below the ground. 

According to Dr. Y. Chew, Chinese 
herb specialist, the coin was minted in 
the sixth century of the Christian era 
during Emperor Ting Pau's reign. In 
actual value then was 100 Chinese cash, 
about ten cents in American money. It 
is probably 1,387 years old. 

An eastern coin collector offered #900 
for the coin, but the owner is holding 
out for #1,000. 

• • 

MANY DEAD IN FIRE 

One hundred and forty-nine persons 
were reported burned to death when fire 
destroyed the municipal quarters of Tien- 
tsin, China, last week, according to press 
dispatches. Most of the victims were 
beggars sleeping in the place on the straw- 
strewn dirt floor. 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

• 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 



SEATTLE NEWS 

Frank J. Hong, graduate of the Col- 
orado School of Mines, returned to Se- 
attle this week after 14 months' sojourn 
at Valdez, Alaska, where he was employed 
by the Superior Mining company. After 
visiting his family here, the mining en- 
gineer left immediately for Portland, 
Oregon, to join his wife, the former 
Miss Alyce Poy of that city. 

Miss Lily Goon, daughter of the late 
Consul Goon Dip, has been secured by 
the Cathay Club of Garfield Hi to train 
eight girls for an oriental dance number 
in the coming school Funfest. Miss Goon 
is well qualified for the position, being 
a graduate of the Nellie Cornish school 
of Dance and Drama, and the Mary 
Ann Wells school of Dance; she is quite 
an artist in her own right. 



Samuel B. Wong, who was but recently 
made an instructor in bacteriology at 
the U. of W., has accepted an offer to 
do research work at the Peking Medical 
College, a Rockefeller institute at Peking, 
China. 



Frank Mar, holder of a bachelor's de- 
gree in aeronautical engineering from 
the U. of W., and manager of the New 
Asia cafe, is leaving in the near future 
for Oakland, California, where he has 
registered for graduate work with the 
Boeing Aeronautical school. His wife, 
Ruth, and son and daughter, Brian 
Wayne and Barbara Ann, are to join 
him later. In addition to his above ac- 
tivities, the young business man plays 
a good game at forward on the Waku 
Celestials quintet. 



The following Chinese students made 
the honor roll for the past semester at 
the various Seattle high schools: Garfield, 
Betty Chinn, Moses Kay, Kenneth Louie, 
Kai-Wah Eng, May Sing, James Mar 
Wah; Roosevelt, James Hong; Franklin, 
Mary Luke; Broadway, Grace Wong. 



Chitter-ChaCter 

The Gene Lukes have moved to the 
Star Apts. . . Loy Lock, Washington 
aeronautical-engineering grad, is pilot- 
ing a mail plane in Shanghai, China . . . 
Jennie Hong, U. of W. Fine Arts grad, 
is now English secretary to T. V. Soong, 
former Minister of Finance at Nanking 
. . . Josephine Hwang, U. of W. grad, 
is a secretary in Hong Kong . . . Henry 
Chinn and George Doung took over 
the Cathay Garage from Hing Chinn . . . 
Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger 



CHINGWAH LEE TO 
WRITE FROM HOLLYWOOD 

Since signing up with M-G-M two 
months ago as "jack of all trades" in the 
production of "The Good Earth", Ching- 
wah Lee has been dividing his time be- 
tween Chinatown and Hollywood, com- 
muting by train or plane each weekend. 
He stated that he will continue to write 
for "The Chinese Digest" and consider 
this work his most important form of 
divertisement. 

During his absence, the Art Studio is 
in charge of Miss Li Ta Ming, and is 
open to special parties from 7:30 p. m. 
to 9:30 p. m. daily. 

The Chinatown Tour is in charge of 
an able and efficient crew composed of 
lecturers Ernest Lum, Eddie Leong, James 
Jang, and Harry Lee, and assistants Ri- 
chard Ming Lee and Vincent Gunn. 

Dr. Chang W. Lee, Ching's brother, 
will serve as counselor for The Chinese 
Trade and Travel Association. 

• • 
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
AT BERKELEY 

It has been a custom for the Chinese 
members of the International House at 
Berkeley to sponsor several Chinese pro- 
grams each semester. 

Sometime in the near future, they will 
sponsor a large tea at which a promin- 
ent Chinese will be the main speaker. 
They have also planned a Chinese play 
to be given at a later date for Interna- 
tional House members and friends. 

There are activities every day in the 
week and anyone desiring to know about 
these may secure information from Helen 
M. Fong, Chinese student secretary. 

• • 

Harry "Mac" Chinn is getting a "Ger- 
man goiter" running the New Butterfly 
Cafe . . . Mary Hong, Frances Lew, and 
Kaye Hong attended the U. of W. Vaga- 
bond Club's progressive dinner this Fri- 
day . . . Six members of the Chinese 
Student hoop squad attended a midnight 
premiere at the Orpheum Theatre and 
failed to get up for their 8 o'clock classes 
the same morn. 



YOUNG KEE 

Radio and Electrical Repairs 
— Keys Made — 

772 Jackson Sc . . CHina 0489 
San Francisco, California 



and Better Paper 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 

The Los Angeles Chinese Pistol Club, 
to our knowledge, is the only Chinese 
pistol club in Southern California. This 
club is forging ahead and is showing pro- 
mise of being a winning team. 

Serving the club are: president, Peter 
Soo Hoo; secretary, Thomas Wong; 
coach, Dr. S. T. Ching. Other members 
are: Captain Bob Jowe, Bill Wong, David 
Soo Hoo, Harold Yee, Layne Tom, Mar- 
cus Ching, and Mrs. S. T. Ching. The 
latter is a very prominent shooter and 
has won many medals in various com- 
petitions. 

Dr. Ching is coaching the Boyle 
Height police, and has won many medals. 
Another medal winner is Bob Jowe. 

Club matches are held on every fourth 
Sunday of the month at Boyle Height 
Range. All visitors are welcome. 



Swaying to the strains of rhythmic 
tunes will be the members and friends 
of the Mei Wah Girls' Club when they 
stage their Fifth Anniversary Dance at 
the Hollywood Masonic Ballroom on Sat- 
urday night, March 14. The ballroom 
is located on Hollywood Boulevard, dir- 
ectly across the street from the Grauman's 
Chinese Theatre. 



Swinging into the social calendar of 
the year, the Jefferson High School Chi- 
nese Club held their first social at the 
International Institute last Friday night, 
February 21. 

Guests of the occasion were the Jeffer- 
son High School Chinese Alumni. A 
good time was reported by all. 



Mr. and Mrs. Jack Wong and Mrs. T. 
T. Taam and son, Martin, are visiting in 
Bakersfield, as the guests of Mrs. Lillie 
Yim, a prominent business woman of 
that city. 



The expected visit of General Fung 
Chung Wu is being looked forward to 
with great anticipation by the people of 
Los Angeles. 

General Fung Chung Wu is the man 
who fought so valiantly against the Jap- 
anese in Northern China. At present 
the General is touring in Canada and in 
the East, and will be in Los Angeles soon. 



Marysville "Bomb Day" 
Draws Crowd 

Marysville was the scene of one of the 
most elaborate celebrations, drawing 
crowds from every part of the State to 
this gala affair, the Bomb Day. 

A program of ten features, with the 
Dance of the Dragon featured, was pre- 
sented by the Chinese children at the 
Sunday night Bomb Day Ball at the 
Marysville Art Clubhouse. Approxi- 
mately twenty boys and girls participated, 
under the direction of Mrs. Ruby Kim 
Tape. Richard Lim and Kim Chew han- 
dled the massive Dragon head, with the 
tail controlled by Jim Lim, while Bobby 
Kim wielded the pompom teaser enticing 
the dragon to dance. Jim Ng, Daniel 
Mark and Jerry Leong, a recent arrival 
from China, handled the drum, gongs 
and cymbals. 

Preceding the dance of the dragon, 
songs and dances were rendered by Alice 
Horn, Elsa Horn, Lily Tom, Caroline 
Horn, Joe Waugh Jr., Kathleen Foo, 
Ruby Foo, Dan Kim, Charles Foo, Ber- 
tha Waugh and Dorene Foo. 

Eleven door prizes with a value of at 
least $75.00 were contributed by Chinese 
merchants for the ball. Awards included 
a crimson satin Mandarin coat, large red 
cloisonne rose jar, brass candelabrum, 
white fur bunny mules, blue and rose 
Chinese flower bowl, feather fan, carved 
Chinese bookends, dark amber beads, 
cloisonne ash tray and yellow China 
incense burner. 

Judge Warren Steel of the Yuba coun- 
ty superior court, extended greetings of 
the community to the Chinese, with Sam- 
my Yee, a graduate of Marysville High, 
responding. 

• • 



Making their first appearance before 
a large congregation at the last Union 
Meeting, the Methodist Church Choir 
was well received. 

The choir is directed by Mrs. Messin- 
ger, who is also at the head of the Con- 
gregation Church choir. 



The Chung Wah Chinese School of 
Los Angeles is offering a military train- 
ing course to all the young Chinese stu- 
dents of their school in the near future. 
The course will be held one hour a week. 

Patronize Our 



The Chinese Student Association of 
Southern California will hold their con- 
vention at Pomona College in May. 



The Chinese Students' Club of the Uni- 
versity of Southern California held their 
meeting on Friday, Feb. 18, at the home 
of Professor Claude C. Douglas. 



TECH HIGH CHINESE 

Frederick Quan was recently installed 
as president of the Oakland Technical 
Chinese Students Club after the resigna- 
tion of the president-elect, Edward Quon. 
Other officers are Jane Quan, secretary. 
George Chew, treasurer; Ed Chan, boys' 
social chairman; and Henrietta Quan, 
girls' social chairman. 

REV. RIDING TO SPEAK 

The Luncheon Group and the Cru- 
saders Club of the Oakland Chinese Pres- 
byterian Church will hold a special 
Young People's Service this Sunday, 
Mar. 1, at twelve o'clock. They have as 
their speaker Rev. Loren H. Riding, as- 
sistant pastor and director of Young Pe- 
ople's work of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Berkeley. A special musical 
program has been prepared for the ser- 
vice. 

• • 

S. F. J. C. PARTY 

On Feb. 14, the Chinese Students' Club 
of the San Francisco Junior College gave 
a Valentine Party-Dance for its members 
and friends at the N. S. G. S. Hall. The 
party was well attended and novelty val- 
entines were passed out to those present. 
Richard Lum was chairman of the affair. 

• • 
CHESTER GAN CAST IN MOVIES 

With a company of fifty-five actors 
and cameramen, the 20th Century Fox 
Film Company is now shooting "The 
Country Beyond", on the shores of Don- 
net Lake near Truckee. The story is 
the screen version of James Oliver Cur- 
wood's Canadian novel, and will star the 
190-lb St. Bernard dog, "Buck", who 
gained fame in the filming of "The Call 
of The Wild", by Jack London. 

One of the prominent actors in the 
cast of this picture is Chester Gan, well- 
known Chinese actor and a former San 
Franciscan. 

• • 

Instructors for the evening English 
classes of the Chinese M. E. Church are 
Misses Ida Chan, Emily L*e and Bev- 
erly Wong. 



ALFRED B. CHONC 




INSURANCB 

Kinui City I. if* Iniuranc* Co. 

Office SUtter 2995; Rci. PRcxpcct 8U5 

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Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



TEA AN D LANTERNS 



Page 5 



AS WE SIP OUR TEA 

The social whirl continues to "go 
round and round." As the reminiscences 
of the gay Yoke Choy Anniversary dance 
still linger, we find ourselves coming to 
our first stop. On Friday, the 21st, we 
looked in at the post Valentine party 
given by Dr. and Mrs. Collin Dong. 
Under the talented supervision of Mrs. 
Dong, a bit of heaven was transplanted 
into their lovely apartment. The drap- 
eries, walls and ceilings were literally fluf- 
fed with hearts. Hearts and more hearts 
seemed to bring back fond memories to 
the many guests as they lingered the eve- 
ning away. Amongst those privileged 
to attend were Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Chan, Mrs. Hayne Hall, Misses Clara 
Chan, Susan Dong, Virginia Dong, Mil- 
dred Ko, Marjorie Koe, Laura Leong, 
and Messrs. Edward Leong, Thomas Le- 
ong, Johnny Foo, Robert Poon, Edward 
Ah Tye, David Lee, Albert Ko, Winfred 
Lee and Rodney Yee. 

Quite a disappointment to many was 
the postponement of the Snow Line trip 
planned by the Cathay Club over the 
double holiday. Chinatown has never 
joined forces to enjoy the winter sports 
and many had planned for this holiday 
excursion. Inclement weather and fail- 
ure to gather a sufficient crowd were 
given as reasons for this postponement. 
Cathay has promised an announcement 
soon enough to participate in this sport 
of sports. 

To make up for the disappointment 
of missing out on the snow-line trip 
your correspondent made a trip to 
watch the annual bomb day celebration. 
This event held on one of the most re- 
membered festival days of the old Chi- 
nese calendar, has been an annual cele- 
bration of Marysville since the early 
fifties. Misses Waite Eng, Evelyn Wing, 
Viola Yee, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Dong, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee On, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Quong Lee were a few of the San Fran- 
cisco people who travelled to Marysville. 

On the 28th we sauntered to the Chi- 
tena Social to hear the final results of 
their first annual election of new officers. 
The party at Hang Far Low was 
typical of the many socials which this 
infant organization has held during the 
past year. Sixty five, and all active, 
members were too busy enjoying them- 
selves to worry about officers and politics. 
With Kern Loo as their ever popular 
social chairman, the affair was a howling 
success and we forgot our reportorial 



CHINESE CIRCLE TO GIVE DANCE 

The Sat-Sut Circle of Honolulu, at 
its quarterly meeting, decided that its an- 
nual dance "Spring Frolic" will be held 
at the Rendezvous Club. The following 
committee chairmen were chosen: Robert 
' Ching, general chairman; Samuel Luke, 
vice-president; Francis Ching, tickets; 
Arnold Chow, posters; Milo Lum, adver- 
tising; Reginald Lee, clean-up; and 
Charles Soon, floor manager. 

• • 
C. C. Y. M. A. PARTY 
GIVEN SUNDAY 

A Get-Acquainted Party was given last 
Sunday evening by the Chinese Catholic 
Young Men's Association, with over a 
hundred persons attending. Included in 
the program were demonstrations by 
members of the Boy Scouts Troop 34, an 
exhibition match in badminton, some 
special entertainment by two KYA 
radio artists, and two boxing bouts of 
three rounds each by members of the St. 
Mary's boxing group. Harry Gee, 
assistant scoutmaster of Troop 34, was 
chairman in charge of the affair. 

• • 
HONOLULU COUPLE 
ENTERTAINS AT DINNER 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lee were hosts 
at a Chinese dinner last week. During 
the dinner a five-piece orchestra, under 
the leadership of Elizabeth Ching pro- 
vided the music. Ruby Lai rendered a 
solo on a Chinese moon harp, while La- 
verne Mareks gave her interpretation of 
the Hawaiian hula. Assisting as host- 
esses were Mable and Violet Lee. 

• • 

duty so we will be unable to report the 
results of the election at this time. 

The Wah Ying Dance has become 
"the talk of the town." First planned as 
a reward of trophies dance, it has now 
become a regular leap year hop. From 
the N. S. G. S. it has moved to the spa- 
cious Trianon Hall. On the 29th of 
February more than 15 of Chinatown's 
budding athletes will receive medals and 
honors for their prowess as basketballers. 
The Scouts' team will gather in most of 
the medals and many feminine smiles and 
heartbeats, but admiring eyes will also 
be cast at the 'lovely' boys of Shangtai, 
runner-up for the championship. Until 
we can give you a dance-mad view of the 
party, we will saunter on to Hayne's 
Sport Shop for our usual rubber of 
bridge. 



Lien Fa Saw You 

Fur coats are making a bigger hit with the 
Chinese girls this season than ever before. 
Attractive Mrs. Anne Fong of Oakland 
wears a brown caracul coat, slightly swag- 
gered, plain neat collar, and small puffed 
sleeves, under which I noticed a Mandarin 
red crepe tunic frock, the blouse specked 
with gold dots, glittering hither and yon. 
Mrs. William Lew, who, before her re- 
cent marriage was Miss Adeline Wing, was 
seen wearing a forest green ensemble 
while shopping one day. Being tall and 
slender, the bell sleeves and large buttons 
of the short loose coat were most appro- 
priate. Her simple dress had a fringed 
'kerchief, and a 3 inch belt which ends up 
with a pert bow also fringed. Brown ac- 
cessories went with this suit. 

Caught playing tennis — Blue and yel- 
low clad was Miss Jennie Bowen of Oak- 
land (certainly a fair rooter for Cal) ! 
Under her royal blue brushed wool jacket 
was a brilliant yellow barrel sweater, with 
blue sport skirt and very cute yellow an- 
klets. This dashing and popular color 
combination does become Miss Bowen. 

Watching the tennis game, Miss Jane 
Lowe, also of Oakland, was certainly a 
pretty picture of youth — in a clear blue 
gingham dress with matching open sweat- 
er and comfortable oxfords of white. Her 
glossy hair was brushed back and ended 
in loose curls. 

Ah — Ginghams remind one of Spring- 
time! 



Paliclique Dance 



April 1 1 marks the date of Paliclique's 
3rd Annual Spring Informal dance. It 
will take place at the central Y. W. C. A., 
620 Sutter Street. 

The rhythmic concoctions of Sebring 
and Smith's 8 collegiate musicians, fea- 
turing a dazzling blond songstress, will 
put Spring in your heart and rhythm in 
your feet! 

Start your Spring right by attending. 
Remember, girls, this is leap year, so 
don't be bashful if the boys are acting 
too hesitant. 

• • 

S. F. J. C. CHINESE 
TO HOLD "JINX NITE" 

On Friday, Mar. 13, the Chinese Stu- 
dents Club of the San Francisco Junior 
College will hold a "Jinx Night." Other 
clubs of the junior colleges have been in- 
vited to be guests on the tour to spots of 
interest in Chinatown, with its club mem- 
bers as guides. The S. F. J. C. hopes to 
include a visit to the City Morgue and 
the Hall of Justice in its program. 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



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POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



This week besides the regular 'POO' 
I am pinch hitting for the Towntrotter, 
too. This gives the Trotter a chance to 
squat down for a change. 



Sadie Chan (Mrs. Charlie Chan) re- 
turned to Stockton for a week's vacation. 
Remember I didn't say that she returned 
home to Mother's for that would be an 
entirely different story. 



Harold Koe, one of our most frequent 
visitors, dropped in (or down) from up 
north, and before anyone knew it he 
dropped out of town again, this time 
to L. A. 



May Louie, the young lady who used 
to work at the New China Cafe, is now 
to be seen at the Sun Wah Kue Restaur- 
ant. 



Those of you who know the story of 
why the chicken crossed the road, but 
not 'Why the students cross the street 
from the Library' should ask Johnny F. 
W. He seems to have made a study of it. 



To you who are skeptical about there 
being any romance in the meat markets — 
get in touch with Ted Young, formerly 
of L. A. Ted is now connected with the 
newly opened California Meat Market in 
Watsonville, and says that the meat busi- 
ness is going up. I wonder if he meant 
the prices. 



Earl Louie and wife went down to the 
San Diego Fair with Kern Loo. The trip 
was very successful and enjoyable, so the 
report went. If you know who paid for 
the meals, I mean most of them, you will 
realize why the three of them said it was 
enjoyable. I pity the friends down south. 



Is my face scarlet? Imagine me get- 
ting a sound thumping from a girl. Now 
don't get me wrong, it was no fight but 
just an embryo doctor trying to find out 
if I am normal or not. Was I surprised 
when she said that she was disappointed 
because of my absolute normalcy. Mebbe 
I should get sick just for her to practice 
on. 

One of the most elaborately decorated 
parties was the Post Valentine party given 
by one of our younger matrons. If you 
will bear with me, I'll endeavor ■ meagre 
description of the setting for the partv 

The party was held in two rooms, to 
(Continued on Page 7) 



Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Mak.c This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 7 



CHINATOWNIA 



Seattle Night School 



Over twenty years ago, the Chinese 
Night School was organized in the city 
of Seattle, exclusively for Chinese stu- 
dents, ranging from beginners to those 
who are ready for college. The school, 
located at 925 King Street, is sponsored 
by the Chinese Baptist Church and the 
Seattle Baptist Young People's Union. 

The school is directed by Locktin Eng, 
recently returned from China. 

A club organization within the school 
promotes social activities. Chin Wai Gai 
heads the school as president, assisted 
by Charles Y. Wah, vice-president. Des- 
pite the fact that there is a wide dispari- 
ty in the ages of the students, the Chinese 
Night School of Seattle enjoys a splen- 
did esprit de corps. 

• • 

FINAL RITES FOR 
CHINESE LEADER 

Last rites for a prominent Oakland 
Chinese, Tom Lung, 51, were held last 
Thursday at the Oakland Methodist 
Episcopal Church, 321 8th Street. Fol- 
lowing the services, the cortege marched 
through the streets of Chinatown, headed 
by a military band. Burial was at the 
Mountain View Cemetary. 

Tom, one of the founders of the Chi- 
nese-American Citizens Alliance and a 
member of its central committee at the 
time of his death, passed away after a 
short illness. A native of San Francisco, 
he was a prominent business man of 
Oakland. 

He is survived by three children, Ar- 
thur, Margaret and Edward. 

• • 
CHINESE, IN DEBT, A SUICIDE 

Lee Gow, sixty-year old Chinese of 
Colusa, California, recently committed 
suicide by hanging himself to an attic 
rafter. His body was found by his cousin. 

Gow left a note written in Chinese 
that he was despondent of failure to pay 
bills which he owed, stating that he was 
unable to pay them, and that many who 
owed him money would not pay him. 
For many years a prosperous man, Lee, 
a native of China, was taken ill and 
spent his remaining savings in seeking 
to regain his health. 

• • 



OAKLAND NEWS 

On March 7, a week from Saturday, 
the Chinese Youth Circle is presenting a 
"Spring Dance and floor show" at the 
palatial Persian Gardens, Webster at 
Grand Avenue. The ballroom has one 
of the most beautiful lighting fixtures in 
the bay region, reflecting a myriad of 
dim or sparkling colors. A spacious 
lounge and a balcony for card games 
are among other features. 

In conjunction with the floor show, 
there will be an elimination Prize Waltz. 
For a Grand Prize, a washing machine 
goes to the fortunate person holding the 
lucky ticket. The gala affair is adver- 
tised as an attempt to raise an activity 
fund for the Chinese Youth. Tickets sell 
for fifteen cents each. 



Last Friday the Waku Auxiliary Jun- 
iors feted Luella Chinn, bride-elect of 
David Chew of Menlo Park, with a sur- 
prise shower and buffet at the residence 
of Marguerite Lun. The guest of honor 
plays guard for the basketball team and 
is a bulwark on defense. 

Dolly Wong, president of the Juniors, 
states that Luella will be the first among 
the Junior members to marry. Since 
this is Leap Year, the girls are curious 
to know who did the proposing. 

Oakland will be the locale of another 
major social event on March 28, when 
the Wa Sung offers for public approval 
an uproarious hi-jinks and amateur show. 
With a silver cup as the chief award, 
talented artists are sending in applica- 
tions for the class-will-tell competition. 
Those who wish to avail themselves of 
the opportunity to sing, dance or act 
are requested to send their entries to Joe 
Lee, 167 Seventh St., Oakland. 

Hal Finney and his seven piece or- 
chestra, formerly of the "Alabam" will 
play for the dance after the show. Every- 
thing is included for the price of ten 
cents. 



CHI-AM SALES CO. 
WINES - LIQUORS - CICARETTES 

Moved to 

826 CRANT AVENUE 

Phone CHina 0291 

Albert Chow, Owner 



As a demonstration of what they have 
to exhibit at the Annual Scout Circus, 
the Chinese Boy Scouts of Troop 45 con- 
structed an observation tower last Sun- 
day afternoon. 

Using ropes and logs the Scouts hastily 
made fast their twenty-two feet tower 
well within the alloted time of ten min- 
utes, under the supervision of Scout- 
master R. L. Ng and David K. Blair, 
Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Ma\e This a Bigger 



Scoutmaster of Troop 33, who lent 
valuable assistance to the boys through 
his knowledge of woodcraft. Amid a 
roll of drums and the plaudits of an 
interested audience, the project was com- 
pleted in workmanlike fashion. 

At the Scout Circus which will be held 
in the Oakland Municipal Auditorium on 
Feb. 28 and 29, the Chinese Troop again 
will display their alacrity before friends 
of Scoutdom. 



Until a suitable place is found, the 
Chinese Center shortly will occupy its 
temporary club-house on 832 Webster 
St. It will serve as a rendezvous for 
meetings, bridge addicts and idle chat- 
tering. 

• • 
CHITENA MEETS 

A general meeting of the Chinese Ten- 
nis Association was held last night 
(Thursday) at the Hang Far Low. An 
election of new officers was also held. 
Discussion followed with regard to a Chi- 
natown tennis tournament, the possibility 
of sending a team to Los Angeles, and a 
reduction in the club dues. 

• • 
POO POO 

(Continued from Page 6) 
gain access one had to pass thru the 
'door way of hearts' over which reposed 
this sign, "Cupid's Love Rooms". Sep- 
arating the two rooms was a curtain of 
hearts cleverly strung on a cord. The 
ceilings were transformed into two huge 
spider webs of red and white. In the 
web may be seen spider eggs (balloons 
of all colors) ; hanging from the webs 
were hearts with verses printed on them. 

In one room the draperies were pinned 
with red hearts of all sizes to form a huge 
heart while small arrows formed a huge 
arrow piercing the heart. 

In the other room Cupids of all sizes 
were pinned on to the draperies. There 
were two huge hearts one in each room 
with the words "I LUF U". The lights 
were all covered with red paper giving 
the rooms a mellow red glow. The buf- 
fet table was covered with a red table 
cloth, on which the heart candies took 
their places before surrendering later in 
the evening to sandwiches, etc. 

Of course, you realize that one look 
is better than a thousand words; and if 
I had had my faithful old "brownie" 
with me, I would not need to write this 
to paste in my scrapbook a memory of 
a most delightful evening spent. 
and Better Paper 



Uf 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 

EDITORIAL 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, ?2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, J! 2. 7 5 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 



STAFF 



CHING WAH LEE 

WILLIAM HOY 

FRED GEORGE WOO 

CLARA CHAN 

ETHEL LUM . 



..Associate Editor 
.Associate Editor 
-Sports 



ROBERT G. POON 



Fashions 

-Community Welfare 
Circulation 



CORRESPONDENTS 


AND REPRESENTATIVES 


Los Angeles _ 


William Cot, Elsie Lee 


Oakland 


Hector Eng, Ernest Loo 


Portland _ 


Eva Moe, Edgar Lee 


Seattle 


Eugene Wong, Edwin Luke 


Salinas 




Bakersfield 




Warsonville 


Iris Wong 



WHO? WHO? 

Recent press dispatches state that Japan is willing to 
attempt to settle the Soviet border disputes. She in- 
dicated a willingness that a neutral commission be ap- 
pointed, providing that the commission observe only 
and not render decisions, and that Russia withdraw her 
border troops. 

Japanese authorities declare that Moscow's demands 
for an all-powerful commission was prompted by a de- 
sire to delay settlement and confuse the issues. We 
wonder who is confusing whom. Perhaps Japan re- 
members too well the decision rendered by the League 
of Nations commission a few years ago, condemning 
her with invasion of Manchuria. 



MORE THAN JUST A DATE 

A local Chinese grocery store located on Grant Av- 
enue has, for the past two years, presented their cus- 
tomers with calendars carrying an highly artistic arid 
significant picture of real Chinese art and beauty. Their 
calendars this year, expressively depict the grace and 
charm of the goddess, Kuan Yin. 

A calendar is indispensable in the household, the 
office and the factory. We refer to one practically 
365 times a year. Such being the case, why not have 
our calendars, as much as is practicable, convey in 
pictorial form the history, the culture, or the folk lore 
of China? 



For the Benefit of Chinatown, Too 

San Francisco and northern and central California 
did well in the tourist business during 1935. In fact, 
a new all-time high record was set, both in the number 
of out-of-state visitors and the amount of money they 
put into circulation in this land famous for its hospital- 
ity. 

According to Californians, Inc., local tourist adver- 
tising organization, 1,042,720 residents of other states 
came to this region last year. They spent $66,686,754 
while here. 

At the present time Californians Inc. is conducting 
its annual fund-raising campaign, appealing to local 
business men and organizations for subscriptions with 
which to carry on the work of advertising San Francisco 
and this region. 

Chinatown knows the good work of Californians Inc. 
Tourists to that section have been increasing steadily, 
due in a great part to the advertising of the region by 
Californians Inc. in paid newspaper and magazine ad- 
vertising, through photographs, by feature articles ap- 
pearing in scores of publications, and by generous men- 
tion in the literature distributed by the booster body. 

Californians Inc. have featured Chinese fashion 
shows, Chinese New Year celebrations, street scenes, 
and dozens of other interesting phases of life in the 
largest Chinese section in the world, outside of China. 

Merchants in Chinatown desiring to support Cali- 
fornians Inc., and thus to bring more tourists and visit- 
ors to the stores and shops of the district, can obtain 
a subscription card and further information by tele- 
phoning Californians Inc. 



"Let There Be Light" 

To make for better living quarters means less crowded 
living conditions and more room for expansion. 

In San Francisco's Chinatown the migration from 
Grant Avenue to Powell Street for new and better 
living quarters has met with success; but beyond that 
point, a barbed wire barrier in the form of a concerted 
front with a "we do not rent to Orientals" is presented. 
Occasionally, the answer is "it was just rented this 
morning." 

Until such time when prejudiced landowners see the 
right, housing conditions will remain an inevitable prob- 
lem in Chinatown. 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



rage 9 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LEE 



CERAMIC ART Remember When? 



Chinese Inventions and 



Next week, the writer will include a 
list of important reference books for stu- 
dents of ceramics. By way of introduc- 
tion to these writers it is fitting that we 
quote from two world famous authorities, 
Messrs. Hobson and Burton. 

CHINESE PORCELAIN 

"Once the collector has come under its 
spell, he is apt to desert all his old cera- 
mic loves. And what after all are the 
European porcelains as compared with 
the Chinese? Mere things of yesterday, 
the work of pupils who learnt the rudi- 
ments of their art from the Oriental. 
Europe has scarcely begun to feel its 
way to porcelain manufacture in the ear- 
ly part of the eighteenth century when 
the art of the Manchu potter was at its 
zenith, and the Manchu potter had al- 
ready centuries of tradition behind him. 
The skill of the Chinese potter had been 
proverbial; by this time it was intuitive. 
Satisfying forms flowed spontaneously 
from his wheel: his decorative instinct 
was sure, he had a genius for colour, 
and the combination in his colour scheme 
are as daring as those of Nature her- 
self and as triumphant. Natural apti- 
tude and long training placed him beyond 
competition — and it seems that he enjoyed 
material advantages besides, over his fel- 
lows in Europe. For what European 
porcelain can boast an underglaze blue 
comparable with that of the K'ang Hsi 
blue and white? Where else are there e- 
namels with the brilliancy of the Famille 
verte? Where else the depth and lustre 
of the Chinese monochrome glazes? 
They have no decorative porcelain to 
compare with the K'ang Hsi powder blue, 
the sang de boeuf monochrome or the 
famille noire. They were competing with 
a highly gifted race which had a start 
of many centuries, and at the moment 
when science might have helped them, 
industrialism came and crushed the soul 
out of their art. The result '.s that Chi- 
nese porcelain holds its position unchal- 
lenged. It can only be compared with 
itself." R. L. Hobson. 

• • 

BURTON ON CHINESE PORCELAIN 
"Few races of mankind are known who 
have not taken advantage of the plasticity 
of clay so that pottery is a general, al- 
most a world-wide product. But the 
invention of porcelain demanded an or- 
ganized society, even a settled and peace- 
ful state where workers could be employ- 

(Continued on Page 15) 

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Remember when we had oranges and 
grapefruits imported all the way from 
China? And the children used to chew 
on China sugar canes? 

The oranges reached here packed in 
rattan baskets (law). They are exceed- 
ingly thin-skinned and sweet. The color 
is a deep orange bordering on red, and 
each orange is stamped with a trade mark 
in bold black Chinese characters — the 
Sunkist people did not adopt this idea 
until years later. As the best oranges 
are the first to be chosen, those at the 
bottom of the basket were generally sold 
for a cent less. (Hence the age-old Chi- 
nese phrase "bottom of the basket" for 
elderly unmarried maidens.) 

The grapefruit is really the shaddock 
or pummelo fruit (Citrus decumana), 
and being very sweet and mild as to acid- 
ity is peeled and eaten just like an or- 
ange. They were especially popular dur- 
ing New Years, and are often used to 
decorate altars. After the fruit is eaten 
the skin is used to perfume the bath 
water, or it is dried and used as an herb. 

The sugar cane is another "fruit" 
which used to grace the booths of fruit 
loving Chinatown. They arrived in cof- 
fin-like boxes a foot square and about 
five feet long. The ends of the canes 
were sealed with red clay to prevent dry- 
ing. About two inches in diameter, and 
deep emerald green in color, they made 
the modern brownish cane sickly by com- 
parison. The fruit dealers sell them for 
five cents a foot, slicing the bark off the 
section purchased. The purchaser in 
turn would cut them into three inch 
lengths, quarter them, and chew the in- 
dividual quarters to extract the soul-sat- 
isfying juice. Unfortunately, all three 
were placed under the ban by the Agri- 
cultural Department some twenty years 
ago. But some old timers still dream of 
returning to Canton for "the forbidden 
fruits". 

• • 

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(XIII, XIV) China Had The First 
Planetarium and Relief Map. 

The construction of the marvelous 
planetarium in Los Angeles reminds one 
that a planetarium as well as a huge re- 
lief map was constructed in China more 
than two thousand years ago, and by 
none other than that engineer-dictator, 
Emperor Ch'in Shih Huang Ti, builder 
"of the Great Wall of China. 

Sometime before his death, Ch'in 
Shih Huang Ti ordered seven hundred 
thousand men to construct his mauso- 
leum at Mount Li, a short distance from 
the capital, immediately south of the 
Wei River. The earth was excavated 
down to the water spring, then a floor 
of bronze was put in, and on this was 
constructed the empire of China in mini- 
ature, with raised indicators of the sacred 
mountains, the Great Wall of China, 
and the division of the country into forty 
provinces. Channels filled with mercury 
marked the courses of the Yangtze, the 
Yellow River, and other great waterways. 
It is sdid that the water, issuing from, the 
spring, operates wheels which in turn set 
the mercury in constant motion. An- 
other chamber is filled with rare trea- 
sures, furniture, military weapons, and 
personal articles. 

The dome of the vault was painted a 
deep blue with representations of the 
constellations. Huge lamps, with oil to 
last for years, lighted the place. The 
entrance to the sepulcher was guarded 
by automatic mechanisms which send 
flying arrows and other weapons upon 
trespassers. 

After the burial of the Emperor 
(209 B. C), workmen familiar with the 
place was sealed between the inner and 
the outer gates. The whole mausoleum 
was covered with earth to prevent de- 
tection. This tomb is still intact today, 
although it was claimed that it may have 
been entered during the war preceding 
the downfall of the Ch'in Dynasty. Three 
French explorers visiting the place 
(Journal of the China Branch, R. A. S., 
Vol. XLVIII, 1917) describe it as 
being the most monumental tomb in all 
China. It stands today somewhat py- 
ramidal in shape one hundred fifty feet 
high and four thousand feet in circum- 
ference. 



Page 10 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



CHINESE NURSERY 
SCHOOL 

A nursery school in Chinatown has 
been a long felt need. In no other district 
in the city are there so many working 
mothers, such crowded living conditions, 
and such lack of play space. The habit 
of taking children to factories is not only 
unlawful but detrimental to their health. 
It is indeed a miracle that through the 
years there have been no serious accidents 
to children playing around dangerous 
machinery and in poorly ventilated fac- 
tories. On the other hand, leaving in-" 
fants and pre-school children at home 
alone, often behind locked doors, is 
equally alarming. Especially is this true 
of those homes where gas plates, matches, 
or running water are within reach of the 
children, who are usually confined with 
few, if any, toys. The ill effect of both 
these conditions on the children, psy- 
chologically as well as physically, cannot 
be overestimated. 

There have been various attempts by 
different groups in the community to 
establish a nursery school for these child- 
ren. The lack of economic means and 
the failure of the community as a whole 
to recognize the need have been the 
greatest obstacles. The most recent at- 
tempt gave birth to the present Chinese 
Nursery School, now in its second year 
of existence. Its background history, 
though brief, is interesting. 

Working Nucleus 

At a social workers' meeting in Sept- 
ember, 1933, comprised of workers from 
all social, religious, and health agencies 
in the community, the founding of a nur- 
sery school was suggested as the most 
practical project the group can under- 
take to improve Chinatown's social con- 
ditions. The first step in this direction 
was the organization of a committee to 
study the requirements, equipment, and 
the cost of running such a school. The 
Dept. of Public Health supplied the re- 
quirements and the Golden Gate Kinder- 
garten Association submitted budgets. 
The possibility of Community Chest aid 
was questioned, but it was ascertained 
that a project must run successfully a 
full year before the Chest would even 
consider rendering assistance. The inter- 
est of the Chest was, however, assured, 
and the committee went ahead with its 
plans. 

The location of an available space in 
this congested area constituted the next 
problem. After exhaustive search, the 
largest and most conveniently situated 



ETHEL LUM 




yard for play was found to be the yard 
of the Chinese Presbyterian Home, open- 
ing on Joyce Street. Miss Donaldina 
Cameron also offered the use of the en- 
tire first floor of the Home, with the 
exception of an office, as quarters for 
indoor care and play, eating and sleeping. 
The Golden Gate Kindergarten Ass'n 
offered to supervise the school and to 
provide the salary of a full time teacher 
for one year. A private gift of 0500.00 
for necessary alterations was promised. 
On top of these tendered resources, sub- 
scriptions and pledges from interested 
friends were solicited. 

Unexpected Developments 

While these plans were being consi- 
dered, the Federal Emergency Relief Ad- 
ministration suddenly issued a summary 
notice that it would start a nursery school 
in Chinatown only if on the following 
day, arrangements could be made to en- 
roll the children and open school. The 
social workers acted rapidly, and over- 
night twenty children, from relief fami- 
lies, were gathered together. Thus a 
nursery school was practically forced up- 
on Chinatown, with no time to hold a 
committee meeting or, officially, to ac- 
cept the project. April 28, 1934 marked 
the opening of the school, with offices 
and dressing room facilities in the base- 
ment rooms of the Chinese Y. W. C. A. 
and utilizing as playground the Presby- 
terian Home yard across the street. 

The yard, sheltered by a high fence, 
is ideal for the children's use, remark- 
ably comfortable even on foggy days. 
The first summer, the children, in sun- 
suits whenever the weather permitted, ac- 
tually "lived" in the yard. They imme- 
diately showed the good effects of sun 



baths, milk, and tomato juice. 

After July, 1934, with dishes and food 
supplied by the FERA, a daily nutri- 
tious lunch was served. At first the strange 
food was merely sampled, but soon all 
were eating diligently and were asking 
for second helpings. The effect of the 
lunch soon showed, in improved muscle 
tone and general well-being, if not always 
in increase in weight. 

Cots, provided in December, 1934, 
were placed in the spacious gymnasium 
of the Y. W. C. A., and real rest in one's 
own bed, with no distractions, was en- 
joyed by the youngsters. It took some 
time before they became accustomed to 
sleeping soundly for two hours. At this 
time, the school period was lengthened 
to 3:00 p. m. Rest has done as much 
as, if not more than, the food, and it 
is difficult to recognize the eager, bright- 
eyed, independent children as those who 
entered some months ago. 

Present Conditions And Staff 

When the FERA was dissolved in Au- 
gust and September of 1935, the school 
was threatened with disruption. For four 
months, no public funds were received, 
but the teachers gladly volunteered their 
services. What money on hand from 
contributions was used to provide for 
daily lunches and sundry expenses. From 
the beginning of this year to the present 
time, funds from the Works Progress Ad- 
ministration have made possible the con- 
tinuance of this good work.. 

A head teacher, a nurse, two assistant 
teachers, a cook, and a handyman make 
up the present staff, of which one 
Chinese nutritionist. 33 children are 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



P«H 11 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



WILLIAM HOY. 



A Yankee Adventurer and 
the ' Living Buddha' 

Possibly the most intriguing news story 
of last week, redolent with the breath of 
romance and high adventure, tells of a 
youthful American aviator and soldier of 
fortune, Gordon B. Enders, who has been 
commissioned by the Panchan Lama, spir- 
itual ruler of Tibet, to convert the gold 
dust of the region into currency and to 
use the currency for the modernization 
of that province. 

The Panchan Lama, the news item went 
on to say, was returning to Lhasa, the Tib- 
etian capital, after 12 years of exile, and 
it is his return which is spurring plans 
for the westernization of that mountain 
kingdom which has never known machin- 
ery or any other mechanical gadgets of 
modern civilization. 

The political intrigues of three nations, 
China, Russia, and Great Britain since 
the turn of the century over the question 
of winning the good-will, and ultimate 
suzerainty, of Tibet, have combined to 
make the Panchan Lama at this moment 
a fateful figure in Far Eastern politics. In 
a copyrighted story last week Enders said 
that "throughout Asia this (the Panchan 
Lama's return to Tibet) is the most im- 
portant news event that has occurred in a 
decade. His return to the throne is an 
earthquake to those who shaped the inter- 
national policies of Japan, China, Russia 
and India. For this mountain kingdom, 
located in the center of Asia, may control 
the balance of power among these em- 
pires." 

Speaking of his own work in connection 
with the return of the 'Living Buddha' to 
his native land, Enders said that "one of 
my principal tasks .... will be to push 
forward his aviation program. The first 
step in the proposed aviation service will 
be a single gold carrying plane between 



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Koko-Nor and Shanghai. It will carry 
approximately $500,000 worth of gold 
dust on every trip. This will be deposited 
in Shanghai, establishing foreign credits 
to be used in the purchase of mining 
equipment, road building machinery and 
hydro-electric generators." 

But from whence will come the gold 
that is to be taken out of Tibet? From 
the 3,000 monasteries which have for 
years kept the gold dust in strong boxes. 
The Tibetians believe that gold is a plant 
and that if stored it will grow, especially 
gold nuggets. Thus, the Tibetian lamas 
are the greatest gold hoarders in the 
world. 

Ender's Career 



Although only 34, Gordon B. Enders' 
life so far has been nothing if not ad- 
venturesome and full of the colors of a 
fictioneer's romance. A chain of for- 
tuitous circumstances have put him into 
a unique situation, which is that of, in his 
own words, "(an) official advisor and 
counselor of the theocratic head of an 
Oriental faith with 10,000,000 followers, 
as a member of the Tibetan peerage, 
and the only foreigner in history to hold 
the Panchan's 'Passport to Heaven'." He 
is a soldier of fortune, but not an ordin- 
ary one like those Americans and Euro- 
peans, who have roamed Asia in a horde 
for a generation. Even as a boy, he had 
half-consciously prepared himself for his 
present task. In that preparation lies 
an entertaining story. 

Reminiscent of Kipling's beloved In- 
dian tale, "Kim", is the childhood of 
Gordon B. Enders, American. Born in 
Iowa, he went to India at an early age, 
where his father was a missionary teacher. 
He lived in northernmost India, on the 
fringe of Tibet, and grew up in the com- 
pany of picturesque natives, priests, Brit- 
ish secret agents, and those jealous and 
courageous guardians of the Indian fron- 
tiers, the Bengal Lancers. Like Kipling 
and his brain-child, Kim, Enders amassed 
a prodigious store of Hindu lore from 
the natives and succumbed to the magic 
and the atmosphere of mysterious India. 

In the course of time the American 
youth became interested in the Hermit 
Kingdom across the India frontiers, and 
the stories of Younghusband and other 
British agents who have penetrated a lit- 
tle into that land fired his imagination. 
His interest increased when a British-ed- 
ucated Tibetan took the youngster under 
his wings as a pupil, taught him the 
rudiments of the language and gave him 
a knowledge of Tibet. 
Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Not long after, Enders returned to 
America and finished his education at 
Wooster College, which specializes in 
training youths who have spent the first 
part of their lives in Asiatic countries. 
Here he met other youths brought up in 
every nook and corner of the Orient 
and to whom the customs and languages 
of the Orient are open books. Tibet be- 
came the goal of Ender's ambition. 

Later he saw service in France, becom- 
ing an ambulance driver and aviator. 
Then swiftly he returned to the East, this 
time to turbulent China, where he was 
attached to the American legation. 

And it was at this time that the Pan- 
chan Lama, a voluntary exile from his 
country because of political disagreement 
with his co-ruler, the Dalai Lama, came 
to China. 

The 'Living Buddha' revealed himself 
to be an extr'emely intelligent and able 
personage who had great hopes of mo- 
dernizing his country for the ultimate 
intention of making Tibet a politically 
independent land. Enders was quick to 
see a chance to utilize his early acquired 
knowledge of Tibet and its language to 
aid in fulfilling the Panchan's plans. 

Through the Panchan's Prime Mini- 
ster, Tsu, already a friend of Enders', a 
meeting between the 'Living Buddha' and 
the American followed, culminating in 
the latter's becoming the Panchan 3 offi- 
cial advisor, which meant nothing less 
than being a cabinet member in t'.ie Ti- 
betan national assembly. And Enders 
became the recipient of the "Passport 
to Heaven", number 68, issued to him 
on the 15th day of February ; n the 22nd 
year of the Chinese Repub''c. 

Thus a youthful Yankee became the 
first tcreigner to be an official of Tibet, 
the 'roof of the world.' Fact, sometimes, 
is stranger than fiction. 

(Continued on Page 14) 
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Page 12 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo • 



City-Wide Billiard 
Tournament 

T. Y. Tang and Henry Tom, secre- 
taries of the Chinese Y. M. C. A., com- 
pleted arrangements with the San Fran- 
cisco News and the National Billiard 
Association of America as sponsors of 
a city-wide pocket billiard tournament, 
supervised by Leland Crichton, physical 
director, now being played at the "Y". 

All participants who took actual part 
were given an entry card which en- 
titled them to a chance for the grand 
prize drawing. The grand prize is a beau- 
tiful, newly-designed modernistic 1\ X 
7 foot billiard table for home use, the 
equipment to consist of the new "eye- 
rest" purple cloth, bird s-eye maple wood 
and chromium. Other prizes will be 
given winners of the different classes. 

Last week Jimmy Lee, well-known Chi- 
nese billiard player, and Carl Vaughn, 
former National Amateur Champion, 
gave an exhibition at the Chinese Y. Mr. 
Vaughn amused the audience with his 
trick and fancy shots. One of his tricks 
was picking up twelve balls with one 
hand, which was demonstrated in the 
movies several years ago for Ripleys 
"Believe It or Not." 

According to Allen Low, who is acting 
as manager for Mr. Lee, a reply has come 
from the National Billiard Association 
that Lee will take part in the West Coast 
preliminary tournament for the World 
Championship, which begins sometime 
in March in San Francisco. 

• • 

DEFENDING TENNIS 
CHAMPS VICTORS 

In the Honolulu Tennis League mat- 
ches last week, the Chinese team, defend- 
ing champions, defeated the Ramblers, 
4-1. Scores: 

H. T. Chun defeated Jenkins, 6-2, 6-3. 

Charles Akana defeated A. D. Coy, 
6-4, 6-0. 

Fred Akana-Robert Char defeated 
Jackels-Bode, 6-1, 4-6, 6-2. 

Lee Chong-Clarence Young lost to 
Marlowe-Miller, 2-6, 4-6. 

M. K. Ching-L. Louis defeated Han- 
sen-Diez, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3. 

• • 

Among the budding tennis enthusiasts 
of Chinatown are Mae Chinn and Helen 
Chan, whose brothers are prominent in 
the world of sports. 

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Commerce Trackmen 

Nine Chinese boys are track and field 
candidates at the High School of Com- 
merce, according to word received from 
its coach, Harold Brillhart. Two are 
going out for the Varsity track squad 
while the remaining seven are trying out 
for lightweight events. 

Gordon Pang and Henry Chan are 
candidates for the heavyweight team. 
The lightweights are Daniel Leong, 130- 
1b. shotputter; Ernest Leong and Morris 
Lee in the 120's; Peter Chong, Ng Poy 
and Lee Kee in the tens; and William 
Chan in the hundreds. 

Mr. Brillhart coaches the varsity while 
the lightweights are under the guardian- 
ship of Mr. Prinz. 

• • 
TENNIS STAR LOOKS 
FORWARD TO SEASON 

With the end of the rainy days in 
sight, tennis players will embark into 
extensive practice for the coming season. 
Among them will be Erline R. Lowe, who 
intends to start training shortly. 

We remember that Erline is the rank 
number one player among the girls of 
the Chinese Tennis Association. Al- 
though competition will probably be 
much stiffer than the past season, it is 
expected that she will again hold her 
rank as one of the top racket wielders 
among the fair sex of the Bay Region 
Chinese girls. 

• • 
YOUNG CHINESE DRUB JAPANESE 

Oakland's Young Chinese Club quin- 
tet defeated the Japanese Young Men's 
Buddhists Association last week at the 
Wesdake Jr. High School court, 42-25; 
the Japanese five offering nothing more 
than a little limbering up for the Chinese. 

Key Chinn, with 18 points, led the 
scoring, followed by Shane Lew and Ho- 
ward Joe with seven each. For the losers, 
J. Kayama was best man. 

• • 
"Y" HUNDREDS LOSE TO SCOUTS 

Although completely outfighting their 
favored opponents, the Chinese Y. M. 
C. A. 100-Ib. basketball team lost to the 
Troop 3 hundreds Tuesday night at the 
S. F. B. C. court by a score of 28-24, in 
a deciding game of the J. A. F. tourna- 
ment. Bad breaks attended the "Y" 
five. Johnny Leong and Ulysses Moy 
starred for the winners; and for the loser* 
Robert Lum, Benny Lee and Joseph Chin 
were outstanding. 
Advertisers — They Help to Mak.e This a Bigger and Better Paper 



St. Mary's Quintet 
To Play Sunday 

St. Mary's Athletic Club's quintet will 
make its first public appearance at the 
French Court this Sunday evening tack- 
ling the up-and-coming Chan Ying hoop- 
sters. 

The Catholic boys held a rally last 
Monday to arouse interest and enthusi- 
asm for its team. It is reported that the 
Saints have a well-balanced and exper- 
ienced group of boys on their five and 
may surprise Coach Ong Wah's lads. 
However, Chan Ying players have been 
playing together since they were wee kids 
and should come out the winner, due to 
their possible superior teamwork, besides 
being a fighting and fast-breaking team. 

In the preliminary slated for 7:30 p. 
m., the St. Mary's 120-lb. quint will hook 
up with the Lingnan University hoop- 
men. This game will be close and inter- 
esting as both teams are evenly matched 
as to their potential srength, although 
the collegiates will probably come closer 
to the weight limit than the Saints. 

• • 

CHINESE "Y" UNLIMITEDS 
PLAY RECREATION CENTER 

The Chinese Y. M. C. A. unlimited 
basketball team, entrant in the City Re- 
creation Leaders' Casaba League, will 
clash in its first league tilt with the Re- 
creation Center tonight, at 7:00 p. m. at 
the Mission High gym. 

Members of the quintet are Francis 
Mark, Teddy Lee, Frank Wong, William 
Jow, William Wong, Wahso Chan, Ge- 
orge Ong, Alfred Gee, Henry Owyang, 
and Philip Leong. The team is managed 
by Sam Yim. 

• • 

Among the Chinese boys who took part 
in an amateur boxing program at the 
Honolulu Civic Auditorium were Walter 
Chang, 112 pounds; Walter Y. Kim and 
William Yee Hoy, 135. 



Van Wormer 8C Rodrigues, Inc. 

Manufacturing Jewelers 

Club Pins and Rings 

Trophies and Medals 

126 Post Street 
KEarny 7109 
San Francisco 



Friday, Febryary 28, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 13 



SPORTS 




Watsonville Five 
Downs Salinas 

By a final count of 32-12, the Wat- 
sonville Chinese hoop team took the Sa- 
linas Chinese five down the line, last week 
at Watsonville. 

Score at half time favored the winners, 
9-7. But in the second half, the Watson- 
ville boys clicked and left the losers trail- 
ing far behind. 

For the winning team, Earl Goon with 
ten points, and Hubert Dong were the 
offensive stars, while Billy Lee and Parker 
Chan were great on defense. For Salinas, 
George and Francis Young were out- 
standing. 

• • 

SEATTLE GIRLS WIN GAMES 

The Chinese Girls sextette of Seattle, 
Washington, walloped four Japanese bas- 
ketball teams in as many games played 
during the past two weeks, defeating the 
Lotus girls, 38-6, the Green Lakers 22-2, 
W. W. G. 28-7 and Sumner 7-3. Spark- 
ling team-work by the Chinese accounted 
for the wins. The Seattle Girls have a 
heavy schedule for the next two weeks, 
and the entire .community is expected to 
turn out and cheer for them. 

• • 

SHANGTAI WINS 
FINAL LEAGUE TILT 

Maintaining a comfortable . lead 
throughout the entire affair, the Shang- 
tai hoopsters finished their City Recrea- 
tion League schedule with a victory over 
the Panthers A. C. 41-25 at the Francisco 
gym last week. 

Fred Gok and George Lee with ten 
points each led the winners' scoring at- 
tack with Ted Chin playing a fine all- 
around game. At half the Chinese en- 
joyed a 23-10 lead. 

Final standings gave Shangtai a tie 
for second place in its bracket in Divi- 
sion C of the League with Tay-Holbrook. 

• • 

Chinese Y. M. C. A. ninety-pounders, 
the Blue Eagles, defeated the Columbia 
Park Boys Club 27-23 Tuesday night at 
the S. F. IB. C. court in a J. A. F. con- 
test. Lai Chor, Jack Seid and Theodo 
Fung starred for the winners. 



SPORTS SHORTS 

Troop Three's eighty-pounders, future 
prospects for the Scout Junior and Sen- 
ior Varsity, gave the Salesians 80's a 
severe set-back in a J. A. F. contest last 
week. 



The Chinese Y. M. C. A. 80-pounders, 
the Tigers, defeated the Salesians Boys 
Club eighties in a J. A. F. contest last 
week at -the latter's home court, 14-2. 
Henry Sing Wong, Jack Yim and Wil- 
fred Leong were the stars for the Chinese. 



We note that Fred Hong Wong, with 
24 points in four games, is still the lead- 
ing scorer of the Poly High quintet in its 
A. A. A. campaign. 



Chalking up ten points, Hin Chin led 
the Commerce 130's to a decisive triumph 
over the St. Ignatius thirties, 34-16, in 
an A. A. A. tilt last Friday. 

Jack Wong, former sensational bas- 
ketball player, is contemplating a come- 
back next season. He wants to sign-up 
with a local team. 



It has been heard around Chinatown 
that the Troop Three Track and Field 
Meet, which is open to all athletes (Chi- 
nese) will again be held this year. 



Lum Yee, former San Francisco boy, 
is making good in a big way, athletically 
speaking. Lum is one of the mainstays 
of the basketball team of Richmond Acad- 
emy, a military school in Augusta, 
Georgia. 



The championship game of the P. A. 
A. 130-lb. division was postponed from 
last week to early March. The two teams 
in the title fight are Shangtai's thirties 
and the University of California light- 
weights. 

With Steve Leong tallying seven points 
for high-scoring honors, Galileo 130's 
defeated the local Sacred Heart High 
weight five 33-23 last week in an A. A. A. 
contest. 

Some time ago the O. C. A. C. hoop 
team, sponsored by the Chinese Youth 
Circle (Oakland) won its third straight 
game with a 31-12 victory over the Jap- 
anese Y. M. B. A. five. Gum Wong 
starred with 14 points. The O. C. A C. 
lightweights are entered in the "All-Na- 
tions" League. 



HONOLULU CLOTHIERS 
DEFEAT HALES 

The James Chong Clothiers of Hono- 
lulu handed the Honolulu Hales a 63-25 
beating in a league game on the court last 
week. Running up a huge 38-7 lead at 
half, the winning cage team coasted 
through the second half with ease. Lee 
and Ching with 18 and ten points, res- 
pectively, were the stars, while Walter 
Wong, Bernard Wong and Al Chock al- 
so played bang-up ball. 

• • 
CHUNGSHAN NINE 
LEADS SPRING LEAGUE 

League standings up to last week gave 
the Chungshans a slight lead in the Hon- 
olulu Chinese Spring training baseball 
league, with a record of four victories 
and no defeats, folowed closely by the 
Aquariums, with three wins and one loss. 

As this goes to press, the standings 
will probably be altered, a number of 
games being scheduled to be played in the 
meantime. 

• • 

YOUNG CHINESE 15's 
ENTER LEAGUE 

The Young Chinese A. C. 115-lb. bas- 
ketball team entered the Jewish Center 
All-Nations League, with play due to be- 
gin this week, the Young Chinese and 
Yuke Wah meeting in the opener. 

Gold balls will be presented to the win- 
ning team members, the team to receive 
a trophy. The Young Chinese 115's have 
been runner-up for the past two years. 
Last year, the Nanwah A. C. of San 
Francisco copped the championship. 

• • 

The local National five held its banquet 
last Friday night at the Far East Cafe. 
Reports have it that they will have a bas- 
ketball contest with the Oakland Nation- 
al team a week from this Sunday. 



See Me Before You Buy 

ARTHUR N. DICK 

REPRESENTING 

Plymouth Chrysler 

• 

Bigger Trade-in Allowance 

Low Finance Rate 

Phones: CH 1824 or PRos. 2400 

james w. McAllister, inc. 

Van Ness at Post San Francisco 



Page M 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 

(Continued from Page 11) 
Buddha's Reincarnation 

A "strong, simple face burnt by the 
sun of Tibet, and a sarcastic, penerrat. ng • 
gaze," such is the concise description ot 
His Holiness, Ch'osgyl-Ny-ima, Tashi 
Lama, Panchan Rimpoche, incarnation 
of Amitabha, supreme spiritual ruler of 
Tibet, and worshipped as an incarnate 
God by the Mongolians of Inner Mon- 
golia, Soviet Outer Mongolia, Japanese 
Manchukuo, Afghanistan, Chinese Tur- 
kestan and the Ordos country. 

In a land in which religion is one-half 
superstition, and the other half a real 
way of life, strong indeed is the power 
wielded by the Panchan, and especially 
so since the death of the Dalai Lama in 
December, 1933. 

Just as circumstances made Gordon 
Enders a right-hand man to a Tibetan 
ruler, so circumstances also thrust the 
54 year old Panchan Lama into a niche 
of political importance. Just now Eng- 
land, Russia, Japan, and China are 
watching his movements with more than 
passing concern. 

Reasons: 

By right of conquest Tibet is an inte- 
gral part of China, though the date 
when this first came about is obscure. 
The Manchus in the 17th century may 
have been the conquerors. At any rate, 
several revolts against Chinese domina- 
tion occurred in the 18th century, and 
by 1750 Tibet's government was entrusted 
to the Dalai and the Panchan Lamas, 
respectively its temporal and spiritual ru- 
lers, aided by Chinese commissioners. 

In the latter part of the last century, 
the British in India began to show active 
interest in Tibet. But the then Dalai 
Lama was not interested in British over- 
tures, preferring to intrigue with the Russ- 
ians against the Chinese. 

In 1904, when the present Panchan 
was in his twenties, the British penetrated 
to Lhasa, the forbidden city. A treaty 
was signed, followed by conventions be- 
tween Britain and China which recogni- 
zed the rights of China over Tibet. How- 
ever, Chinese control of the country was 
steadily slipping and the British were 
gaining the upper hand over the Russians. 

In 1908, China made a last desperate 
effort to regain control. Troops were 
dispatched to Lhasa. The Dalai Lama 
fled — to British India. He was not to 
return until 1912 when Tibet, with the 
aid of the British, finally forced the Chi- 
nese commissioner out. From then on 
the Dalai Lama was the puppet of Bri- 
tain. Tibet youths were sent to India 

Patronize Our 



and England to be trained as tools of 
British imperialism. 

The training of the Tibetan youths 
prefaced the militarization of the coun- 
try. The lamas, fearing the rise of a 
power in the hands of the youths, pro- 
tested. Relations became strained be- 
tween the pro-British Dalai Lama 
and the Panchan. The result was that 
the latter had to leave the country and 
fled to China. 

From 1926 to 1932 the Panchan trav- 
eled through Mongolia and the Ordos 
country, heard the guns of the Japanese 
in Manchuria, and witnessed fierce war- 
fares in Chinese Turkestan. While in 
Inner Mongolia he saw the Japanese 
making efforts to influence the people 
there against the Soviets. The Panchan, 
on his part, preached loyalty to China. 

The death of the Dalai Lama on Dec. 
17, 1933, was the signal for the Panchan 
to terminate his voluntary exile and re- 
turn as supreme ruler to his country. 
For with the former's death anything 
may happen: civil war, British occupa- 
tion, Russian and Japanese penetration 
— not to forget China, which still right- 
fully considers Tibet her territory. 

The Panchan, therefore, is destined 
to play a principal role in future Far 
Eastern politics. That he will be an able 
political strategist few observers doubt, 
but he has very little taste for politics. 
He is a profoundly spiritual being who 
is more content to pray, to perform spirit- 
ual exercises and to do good to others. 
He wants peace among nations. To an 
American newspaper woman he once 
gave this message: "As Patriarch of 
Tibet I send my blessing to the American 
people. For they are wise in what is 
good, and they know what is evil, and 
this is knowledge that will prevent war. 

"Tell the people of America that I 
know they are not only peaceloving 
enough, but also strong enough, to stop 
war. They are a great religious people, 
and they know this truth — that the love 
of God, which is the knowledge of and 
desire for good, can do away with the 
evils of war, famine and pestilence 
throughout the whole world." 

So spoke the voice of th" "Living 
Buddha." 



HOWARD MACEE 

COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 

• 
EXbrook 0298 San Fnodico 

Anglo Bank Bldg. - 830 Market Sc 



Advertisers — They Help to Mal^e This a Bigger 



CHINESE NURSERY SCHOOL 
(Continued from Page 10) 

now enrolled, with an average attendance 
of 25. These children, 2 to 4^ years, 
come from families on relief, families 
employed by the W. P. A., or families 
of inadequate income. The outside em- 
ployment of the mother or the presence 
of health problems in the home is a gen- 
eral prerequisite for admission. The 
school charges no fees. 

Beneficial Care 

The benefits which a nursery school 
offers to any group of children are doubly 
productive of results among the Chinese. 
The social environment, where the child 
is placed among equals, is difficult for 
the average Chinese home to duplicate. 
Learning how to play and to acquire 
good group habits are privileges not eas- 
ily obtainable for these children. The 
majority of them receive little individual 
care at home. The busy parents cannot 
take time to watch a child go through 
the routines which form part of his 
training, even such a trivial thing as the 
putting on of a shoe or stocking. The 
nursery school, moving at the child's 
tempo, allows time for the gradual mas- 
tery of these tasks. 

The equipment of the school, toys of 
all kinds, chairs and tables, have in great 
part been donated by American friends. 
Here, as in most cases, the community 
waits to be served and is slow to respond 
with contributions. The Chinese habit 
of taking things as they are explains, to 
a great extent, why almost all social re- 
forms or social experiments usually ori- 
ginate from outside the community. 

Future of The Nursery 

The future of the school is rather 
doubtful. The original small committee 
turned over its work, in January, 1935, 
to a larger committee composed of in- 
fluential women representing various so- 
cial and educational agencies through- 
out the city. While the FERA was carry- 
ing on, the committee decided to remain 
in the background. Should W. P. A. 
funds be exhausted in the near future. 
it is hoped that the committee will take 
action to cope wih the situation. The 
permanent housing of the school is still 
the most important problem since, on 
account of other plans, the offer of the 
Presbyterian Home has been withdrawn. 
May the committee find ways and means 
of establishing a permanent nurscrv 
school in Chinatown, the need for which 
has been amply proven. 
and Better Paper 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Pag* 15 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



Dr. Wing, Dean of Lingnan, 
Sails 

Dr. Wing Tsit Chan, Dean of the Ling- 
nan University of Canton, China, sailed 
last week from Honolulu for China. He 
is returning to Lingnan after serving on 
the University of Hawaii faculty during 
the past semester. 

Traveling with Dr. Wing is Dr. Gregg 
Sinclair, director of the Oriental- Insti- 
tute of the University of Hawaii, who 
will confer with scholars in the Orient 
regarding the purpose and methods of 

the institute he is heading. 

• • 

ON A WORLD TRIP 

On board the S. S. President Coolidge, 
on a trip around the world was none 
other than Mrs. Florence Chan, sister 
of Kern Loo, Manager of the Chinatown 
branch of the Pacific Telephone and Tel- 
egraph Company. 

• • 

Wilson Louie returned to Toi Shan, 
China, on the Coolidge last Friday. 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Taft (San Francisco) 
Mar. 3; President McKinley (Seattle) 
Mar. 4; President Hoover (San Francisco) 
Mar. 11; President Grant (Seattle) Mar. 
18; President Pierce (San Francisco) 
Mar. 31; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Apr. 1. President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Apr. 8; President Jackson (Se- 
attle) Apr. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Apr. 28; President McKinley 
(Seattle) Apr. 29. 
SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Harrison (San 
Francisco) Feb. 28; President Jackson 
(Seattle) Feb. 29; President Lincoln 
(San Francisco) Mar. 6; President Hayes 
(San Francisco) Mar. 13. President Mc- 
Kinley (Seattle) Mar. 14; President Hoo- 
ver (San Francisco) Mar. 20; President 
Wilson (San Francisco) Mar. 27; Presi- 
dent Grant (Seattle) Mar. 28. 



WANG CHING-WEI 
SAILS FOR GERMANY 

While rumors circulated in Shanghai 
of new plots against the pro-Japanese 
statesman, Wang Ching-wei, former pre- 
mier of China who resigned recently 
after being wounded seriously by an as- 
sassin, embarked secretly last week on 
board a steamer bound for Germany to 
recuperate from his wounds. Although 
other reports said he would disembark 
at Hong Kong, friends of the ex-premier 
declared he was on his way to Germany. 

• • 

Willie Lim, former Troop 3 scout, is 
a second lieutenant on the Canton Air 
Force. 

• • 

CERAMIC ART 

(Continued from Page 9) 
ed on practically one task and where 
their livelihood was secure in the tran- 
quil of this specialized occupation. 

Great warlike states like Greece, Rome, 
or Persia, by reason of the very activities 
and unsettlement which war produces, 
were not likely to pursue the arts of 
peace so far and their finest pottery is 
inferior in material and its inherent qual- 
ities to even the simpler kinds of porce- 
lain. 

What profound artistic feeling may 
be lavished on simple materials the 
Greek painted vases show — but a few 
centuries saw the rise and decline of this 
art and their history is but a day or as 
a tale that is told in comparison with 
that of porcelain, which still pursues its 
unrivalled way as monarch of all the 
species of pottery. (European imita- 
tions) are only as eddies in the tide and 
the flood tide is ever toward the finest 
and the best, and there Chinese porce- 
lain towers supreme, defying all rivalry, 
and all but the most worshipful ap- 
proach." William Burton 



VITAL STATISTICS 
BIRTHS 

A daughter was born on Feb. 12 to 
the wife of Li Thew, 126 Waverly Place, 
San Francisco. 



A daughter was born on Feb. 15 to 
the wife of Louie Kam Hoy, Berkeley, 
California. 



A son was born on Feb. 18 to the wife 
of Jackson Pond, 1115 Stockton St., San 
Francisco. 



A son was born on Feb. 17 to the wife 
of Harry Lum, 16£ Waverly Place, San 
Francisco. 



A notice of intention to wed was filed 
by Albert S. Lee and Wong Qui, both 
of San Francisco. 



A notice of intention to wed was filed 
with the San Francisco county clerk by 
Chin Kwan and Cha Nong, both of San 
Francisco. 

A daughter was born on Feb. 1 1 to the 
wife of Wong Tuck Get, 1562 Geary St., 
San Francisco. 



A son was born on Feb. 1 1 to the wife 
of Chan Lai Hong, 562 Grant Avenue, 
San Francisco. 

A son was born on Feb. 17 to the wife 
of Harry Lum, 16£ Waverly Place, San 
Francisco. 

A daughter was born on Feb. 9 to the 
wife of Lim Chinn, 1058 Grant Avenue, 
San Francisco. 

• • 

An application for a marriage license 
was filed with the San Francisco County 
Clerk by William Jeung and Lillie Wong, 
both of 26 Beckett St., San Francisco. 

• • 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Sir: Enclosed find $ for 

period of The Chinese Digest. 

Name 

Address — 

City State.. 

Six Months #1.25; 1 Year #2.00;Foreign #2.75 Year. 



fage 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, February 28, 1936 



MORE 

MOORE 

FIRSTS" 



m 



NO doubt the first robin 
will have a plaid breast thij 
Spring as men's wear has 
gone plaid in a big way 



PLAID suits. Plaid jackets. 
Plaid slacks. Plaid shirts. 
Plaid sox. Plaid pajamas. 
Even Mansco plaid shorts! 
By Manhattan and knock' 
outs at 75c 

LATIN from Manhattan 
(the shirtmaker) , . . is the 
"Bolero"sportshirt.Of dull 
Chardonnet . . washable . . 
durable. Neck worn open 
with ascot scarf or closed 
with tie. Loop front $2.95. 
Button type $2.50;all colors 



SHOWIER or blower? 
Manhattan pocketchiefs 
serve for both and you don't 
have to " blow in" much 
for them! Colorcast woven 
fabrics . . . SPECIAL 25c 
6 for $1.40 



JMail orders 

sent subject to your 

approval 

Postage prepaid 

WRITE 

Personal Shopper 
840 Market, S. F. 




A NIP O 1 SCOTCH 
FOR SPRING BY 




, T»here l s a Scotch kick in this 
-*■ tasty Manhattan. It's last year's 
hit (deep Forestones) duplicated 
in this Spring's newTartan plaids 
Blue . . grey . . green. Flannel 
finish. Button down collar. 
Treat yourself to one at 



$ 



2 



MOORE'S 

Home of Hart Schaffm* & Marx Clothes 

840 Market 141 Kearny « 1450 B'way 

Opp. Emporium Near Sutter Oakland 

(* Chinese Salesman here: Edward Leong) 




"•»> 



cw«ese * 




© 



ft WEEKLY fueucsmoK 



COMMENT- SOCIAL > - SPOaTS 
UCIVS •>> CULTUS.€ * - LlT£C£7Ua£ Sam eaftNctsco.cMifOBiuft 



E 



Vol. 2, No. 10 



March 6, 1936 



Five Cents 



FAR EAST 



WILLIAM HOY 



CHINESE PROTEST PRESS CENSORSHIP 

Censorship by the Nanking government of the native 
language press, which is daily growing more rigid with 
the advance of the present student agitations through- 
out the country and the movements of Japanese troops 
into North China, is being rigorously protested by 
Chinese journalists and students of journalism. Recent- 
ly the Shanghai Reporters' Association, comprising some 
of China's foremost newspapermen, addressed a peti- 
tion to the government calling for a more reasonable 
method of controlling the dissemination of news. 

The students of six colleges and universities where 
journalism is taught have also sent petitions to Nanking 
for the immediate abolition of the native press censor- 
ship. The institutions include the Central Training 
Institute at Nanking, the Peiping School of Journalism, 
the Yenching University of Peiping, the Fuhtan Uni- 
versity of Shanghai, Shanghai University, and the Can- 
ton School of journalism. 

The chief argument of the petitions is that since 
Chinese newspapers and periodicals are so rigidly cen- 
sored, the patriots and leaders of the country are kept 
ignorant of the present political situation and of im- 
portant happenings which vitally affect the welfare of 
China. 

Foreign Press Has More Freedom 

The censorship of foreign press dispatches, which 
until recently was as strict as the censorship imposed 
on Chinese news dispatches, has relaxed somewhat. 
New government regulations permit the foreign corres- 
pondents to cable or mail news of an ordinary nature; 
movements of armies or items which the censors may 
rule as revelations of "military secrets", however, are 
still being suppressed as formerly. 

Although the foreign-language newspapers published 
in China are nominally under no censorship of any 
kind, being published by persons enjoying extraterri- 
torial privileges, yet the Chinese government can, and 
at times does, prohibit some issues from circulation by 
mail if they are found to have violated censorship re- 
gulations by the publication of damaging news or edi- 
torials. 

Censorship Severe in North 

At the present time the censorship is operating in 
all its severity in Peiping and Tientsin, centers of North 
China news sources. Certain Northern newspapers have 
accused the Japanese as forcing the local authorities to 
forbid any references to opposition to autonomy or 
any criticisms of the present alleged Japanese-fostered 



autonomous state. 

PROJECT TO CONTROL YELLOW RIVER 

Plans for the control of the Yellow River, which 
yearly overflows its banks and sweeps millions of farm- 
ers to their death, have recently been completed by the 
Chinese government conservancy board. 

The general plans include the building of dams and 
reservoirs at the upper reaches of the river to stem the 
onrush of the current, the dredging of the river delta 
and the opening of numerous tributaries to divert the 
waters. The details of these plans were worked out 
by engineers after several years of study. 

The plans also include the tstablishment of eleven 
afforestation stations along the banks of the, river. 
Will Cost 60 Millions 

The cost of this great engineering project is estimated 
to cost #60,000,000 (Chinese) and the work can be 
completed in five years. 

The Yellow River, known in Chinese geography as 
the Hwang Ho but to the country as "China's Sorrows", 
is roughly 2,500 miles long. The area of its basin is 
about 600,000 square miles and contains a population 
estimated at 100,000,000. For many years foreign en- 
gineers and other experts have declared the taming of 
the Yellow River lies in two words: afforestation and 
conservancy. 

KWANGTUNG FINANCE IN BAD SHAPE 

Although the province of Kwangtung is considered 
the richest province in China in point of revenues, yet 
the Provincial Administration is facing a deficit of 
#10,000,000 (Chinese) during the current fiscal year, 
a report revealed. The annual receipts are estimated at 
#50,000,000 and the disbursements at #60,000,- 
000. 

As a result of this enormous deficit the Provincial 
Department of Finance is devising plans to balance the 
budget. It met a serious setback, however, when its 
application for the appropriation of #1,500,000 from the 
proceeds derived from the 24th year (1935) Telegraph 
Loan was rejected by Nanking's Minister of Communi- 
cations. 

In his reply the Communications Minister took pains 
to point out that the bonds of the Telegraph Loan, 
amounting to #10,000,000, have been mortgaged with 
the Shanghai banking houses for #6,000,000 in cash. 
After repaying maturing obligations and appropriating 
a portion for the sinking fund, there is but a small 
amount left. 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday.March 6, 1936 



FAR EAST 



MRS. CHIANG APPOINTED 
TO HIGH POST 

Following China's purchase of #3,000,- 
000 worth of American built fighting 
planes last month, Mrs. Chiang Kai-shek 
has been appointed director and secretary 
of the China National Aviation Com- 
mission, it was revealed last week in Hong 
Kong. Mrs. Chiang will take complete 

charge of military aviaton. 

• • 
STUDENTS RIOT IN PEIPING 

A raid by 400 policemen on Tsinghua 
University searching for student agitators 
in Peiping were met by more than a thou- 
sand students, including many girls. Sev- 
eral were injured in the battle that fol- 
lowed between the students and police. 

• • 
THOUSANDS KILLED 

AND WOUNDED IN BATTLE 

1,300 Communists were killed and 700 
wounded in an engagement with govern- 
ment troops on the Szechuan-Sikong bor- 
der, according to the report of General 
Hsieh Yo, commander of the Second 
Route Army. Five hundred Reds were 
taken prisoners. 

General Hsieh stated in his communi- 
que that his command suffered 600 dead 
and wounded. The Red army was com- 
manded by Chu Te, who withdrew from 
the battle field when darkness fell after 
putting up a stiff resistance all day. 

• • 

Dr. Lo Wen-kan, former Minister of 
Foreign Affairs of the National govern- 
ment, is now a member of the Kwang- 
tung River Conservancy Commission and 
Director of the Whampoa Port Develop- 
ment Administration of the same prov- 
ince. He was appointed to these posts 
several months ago, but did not take up 
his duties until recently. 

• • 

At the end of 1934 the number of rur- 
al co-operatives in China totaled 14,649, 
representing an increase of 180 per cent 
over the previous year, according to the 
National Economic Council. At the nd 
of 1933, the total number of co-opera- 
tives was only 5,335. 

• • 
EX-PREMIER OF 
CHINA VISITS HAWAII 

In a last-minute change of plans, 
Wang Ching-Wei sailed for Honolulu 
instead of going to Germany, as first 
planned. The former premier of China 
will recuperate in Hawaii from bullet 
wounds received when an attempt on his 
life was made last December. 

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NOTICE 

A number of persons have been 
identifying themselves as representa- 
tives of the CHINESE DIGEST. 

The public is cautioned to ask our 
representatives for their identification 
cards, issued to bona fide members of 
the staff. 

Identification cards are printed on 
brown cards, with four fliinpag char- 
acters. If any other information is 
needed, kindly call CHina 2400. 

JAPAN IN NEW COUP MOVE 

Following upon the heels of reports 
that the Japanese militarists were attempt- 
ing to sponsor an "independence" state 
in Inner Mongolia, reports from official 
sources in Amoy, in southeastern Fukien 
province, indicated that Japan's repre- 
sentatives were backing another "inde- 
pendence movement" there, with four 
Fukien counties as a nucleus. 

It was reported that riflemen from the 
Japanese possession of Formosa have 
landed at Amoy. The Cantonese govern- 
ment called a meeting of its defense coun- 
cil, the area being adjacent to Kwang- 
tung province under Canton direction. 
Authorities of Kwangtung said that an 
army would be sent into the area if the 
Japanese attempt the coup in Fukien. 

MORE PUBLIC HIGHWAYS 
IN CHINA 

During 1935 more than 29,000 kilo- 
meters of public roads linking nine pro- 
vinces were built under the direction of 
the National Economic Council. The 
provinces where the new roads were laid 
include Kiangsu, Chekiang, Anhwei, Ki- 
angsi, Hunan, Hupeh, Fukien, Shensi, 
and Kansu. 

The network of highways completed 
so far by the Council total 30,000 kilo- 
meters, with about 3,800 kilometers still 
under construction. 



HOWARD 


MAGEE 


COUNSBLLOR-AT-LAW 

• 
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Anglo Bank Bid*. • 830 Market St. 



JAPAN SPURS NEW 
"INDEPENDENCE" MOVE 

The creation of an independent pro- 
Japanese state in Inner Mongolia under 
the self-styled modern "Genghis Khan," 
Prince Teh Wang, was one of the con- 
crete developments in Asiatic affairs, 
with a declaration of independence by 
the prince said to be imminent. 

Prince Teh has been conferring with 
Japanese leaders in Peiping for some 
weeks. The creation of a buffer state 
between Japanese-dominated North China 
and the puppet state of "Manchukuo" 
on one side and Outer Mongolia on the 
other is the aim back of this Japanese- 
proposed Inner Mongolia independence, 
which, if successfully carried out, would 
give Japan added dominance of 2,550, 
000 inhabitants and some 750,000 square 
miles of territory. 

• • 
CHINA TO HAVE 
MILITARY TRAINING 

Military officials of the Chinese gov- 
ernment at Nanking last night announced 
that a plan, whereby military training 
will be compulsory, will be introduced 
in China. 

This plan will be tried first as an experi- 
ment among government employees, it 
was reported, and later, if found practi- 
cal, it will be applied to al men between 
18 and 45 years of age. Three years ago 
the Chinese government approved in 
principle nation wide conscription. 

• • 

Foreigners in China are permitted to 
establish higher institutions of learning 
to give advanced technical and academic 
knowledge to educated Chinese, but are 
not permitted to give education to those 
who neither know how to read nor write, 
according to recent regulations from the 
Ministry of Education. 



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Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



WILLOWS CHINATOWN 
DESTROYED BY FIRE 

Chinatown is history now in Willows, 
Glenn County, California. This town 
lost its Chinatown when an early morn- 
ing fire recently destroyed four buildings 
comprising that section with a loss of 
about #5,000. The origin of the fire, 
which has not been determined, is be- 
lieved to have started in the building 
formerly occupied by Lee Yen. From 
an original row of at least twenty build- 
ings, which were built many years ago 
for the Chinese population, fire gradual- 
ly has taken toll until there is but one 
of the twenty standing today. 

• • 
SEVEN CHINESE HONOR 
STUDENTS AT WATSONVILLE 

Out of fifteen Chinese students at the 
Watsonville High School, seven are hon- 
or students of the Scholarship Society. 
Those who made the scholarship, there- 
by receiving their California Scholarship 
Federation pins are: Marian Dong, 
Mary Lee, Dorothy Lee, Evelyn Lew, Ro- 
bert Lew, Mae Wong, and Hazel Wong. 
Marian, a senior, will receive her life 
membership pin and her name will be 
engraved on the school plaque. 

RARE CHINESE DOG 
IN OAKLAND SHOW 

Among the hundreds of dogs com- 
peting Saturday and Sunday at the 27th 
annual Oakland Kennel Show will be 
one of the rarest of dog breeds, a Chi- 
nese Crescent dog, one of three of its 
kind in the United States. 

California's best dogs will compete with 
many prize winners from the Eastern 
States for the big prizes at the Oakland 
Auditorium. 

• • 

WONG — LEE WEDDING BANQUET 

Amid congratulations and best wishes 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lee, who before her 
marriage on Mar. 2nd was Miss May 
Wong of Menlo Park, received close 
friends and relatives at their wedding 
banquet at Shanghai Low. 

Mr. Lee is a florist and grower of San 
Mateo, and a brother of Mrs. Alfred K. 
C. Wong, who is now residing in China. 

Mrs. Lee is 'better known to the younger 
set of Menlo Park and is the sister of Mr. 
Wai Q. Wong. 

• • 

PLAYGROUND FUNDS 

Proceeds of the Marysville Bomb Day 
dance this year will be in support of the 
children's playground at C and Front 
Streets, which was set apart for the Chi- 
nese children recently. 



Defend China, Demands 
General Fang 

"We must resist Japan and defend 
China!" 

These determined words rang through 
the audience as the gathering of over 
two thousand was held spell-bound by 
the speech delivered by General Fang 
Chen-Wu at the Chinese Playground last 
Sunday afternoon. 




Photo by Chinese Digest 



"We must sacrifice our personal inter- 
ests for the salvation of our country," 
declared General Fong, "we must devote 
our whole lives toward our country. A 
united China would well be able to fight 
off the Japanese aggressors, and we must 
do it. It is our solemn and sacred duty." 

The general, a dominant and forceful 
speaker, further stated, amid intense ap- 
plause, "Individuals who are indifferent 
toward the welfare of their mother na- 
tion are foes and traitors of their coun- 
try, even though they may be our best 
personal friends." 

General Fong's speech, delivered in 
Mandarin, was translated into Cantonese 
by his interpreter. 

• • 

Mrs. Joseph J. Chew and son, Russell, 
are in Menlo Park for a brief visit at 
her father-in-law's home. , 



SACRAMENTO NEWS 

By Ruth Fong 

A new organization, the Sacramento 
Chinese Students Association, has been 
formed recently by students of the public, 
language and night schools. The main 
purposes of this association are to unite 
the young Chinese students of Sacramen- 
to, to render benevolent services to the 
community, and to study about China. 
All meetings are conducted in Chinese. 

On Mar. 15, formal inauguration will 
be held at the Chung Wah School. The 
main speaker will be Mr. George Fong, 
who is the advisor. Another feature of 
the program will be an original play by 
the students. Visitors are cordially wel- 
come. Refreshments and a social hour 
will follow. 

Officers of the new club are: president, 
Tung S. Fong; vice-president, David 
Wing; secretary, Ruth G. Fong; Chinese 
corresponding secretary, James Louie; 
treasurer, Paul Fong, Jr.; sergeant-at- 
arms, Paul Yuke; chairman of public re- 
lations committee, Dora Fong; and chair- 
man of activities, Donald Yee. 



The newly organized Chinese High 
School Students Club is swinging into 
its second semester of activities. Officers 
are: president, Paul Fong Jr.; secretary, 
Lucy Fong; and treasurer, Lillie Jang. 
Miss Floa, a counselor at the high school, 
is the club's advisor. 



The enrollment for the spring term 
at Sacramento Junior College is twenty- 
five, with four new students enrolled; 
namely, Mary Fong, Alice M. Fong, Ge- 
orge Yee and James Louie. A dinner 
was recently held at the Chinese Tea 
Garden in honor of these students. Offi- 
cers for the semester are: president, Ginn 
Wong; vice-president, David Wing; se- 
cretary-treasurer, Ruth Fong; and ser- 
geant-at-arms, Walter Chew. 



Mrs. Mabel Tom was hostess to a group 
of young people at her house on Feb. 28. 
Mrs. Tom is the director of the Junior 
Choir of the Methodist Church. The 
guests enjoyed an evening of games and 
refreshments. 

• • 

"ALLEE" TROTS NO MORE 

The Chinese Digest wishes to announce 
that Mr. Albert Q. Lee, a member of our 
staff, has tendered his resignation. 

Ill health necessitates his leaving the 
Digest. The publication wishes him a 
speedy recovery. 



Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



The Towntrotter Says: 

ERNEST YBE (formerly of the local 
Wings Cafe) is running a wine shop in 
Watson ville, I feel kinda thirsty! .... 
GEORGE YOUNG was joined by his 
brother, FRANCIS, at Salinas last week, 
both are working at the Sausal Meat 
Market .... Speaking of Salinas, 
HUGHES CHIN of that town has gained 
about twenty pounds in flesh in a few 
short months — must be prosperous .... 
SUI NAM YIP and CLIFTON FONG 
are budding (or struggling) reporters 
for the Scribe News, weekly publication 
of Oakland Tech High .... Quite a few 
boys remarked that JENNIE OW has i. 
pleasing personality and a winsome smile, 
don't rush, boys! .... CARL FONG is 
working in a grocery store at Yuba City, 
California .... It was rumored that Sa- 
linas lost its basketball game last week 
to Watsonville because FRANK CHIN'S 
mind was not on it, who is "she"? .... 
And down in Monterey, BERTHA LOW 
is a very popular girl among the younger 
set, pity her poor feet last Friday nite 
when the Monterey Chinese dance held 
sway .... AMY CHAN won an apple 
eating contest recently at a meeting of 
the Chinese Youth Circle in Oakland, 
we wonder if there were any worms in 
them .... MAMIE LEE is president of 
the Girls' Student Club in Fresno .... 
Among the honor students at Oakland 
Tech Hi are BESSIE CHINN, EDWARD 
CHAN, FRANCIS QUAN, WARREN 
QUAN, LOU HON LEE, PHOEBE 
CHIN, MABLE CHINN, SUI NAM 
YIP, MABLE WONG and RAY FUNG 
.... ELLA LOWE is just like a rain- 
bow, she's chased by so many young 
Romeos .... PAULINE CHEW sang 
over the radio in an amateur radio pro- 
gram a week ago, and what a divine voice 
she has, rendering "I'm In the Mood For 
Love" .... RUBY FOO came in from 
Marysville last week, but she didn't go 
on any buying tour, instead she secured 
supplies for her school's Chinese Tea 
Party .... CHEE LING, fascinating 
Chinese girl who starred in the movies 
as "Valerie O'Hara" was one of the 
bright attractions last week at the local 
Shamrock Cabaret .... Mr. and Mrs. 
IRA LEE were seen at the San Carlo 
presentation of "Madame Butterfly" at 
the War Memorial Opera House .... 
Also there were GLADYS AND MARIE 
TOM, BEN JOWER, and several others 
So-o-o-o, until next week, So Long! 



OAKLAND NEWS 

The first airplane to be manufactured 
in China is nearing completion and an 
Oaklander and a San Franciscan will 
have a share in its construction. William 
Wong, son of Mrs. Wong Yow of Oak- 
land, and Ray Chang, brother of Anna 
Chang, the songstress, are, at present, 
employed by the Shuichow Aircraft Man- 
ufacturing Company in Shuichow, 
Kwangtung, China. Until this corpora- 
tion came into being, China obtained 
her airplanes through foreign sources. 

Willie obtained his private pilot's li- 
cense while attending U. S. C. and is 
now acting in the capacity of inspector 
at the first Chinese owned aircraft com- 
pany. 

Art Lym, familiarly known as Lym 
Fook Yuen, uncle of Willie ond one of 
the first Chinese aviators to fly in Ameri- 
ca, is now chief of an aeronautical fac- 
tory in Canton. He will head a training 
school for novice flyers. 



Wa Sung will hold its last workout 
session this Sunday morning at San Pab- 
lo Park before engaging in practice tilts, 
preparatory to Berkeley International 
League play on March 29. Coach Al 
Bowen states that sliding will be stressed. 

Last Sunday the club went through a 
strenuous practice. Frank Dun, who led 
in home-runs last year, was clouting the 
ball hard and, in all probability, will play 
third this year. Two veteran campaign- 
ers, Ben Chan, twirler, and Newell Kai- 
kee, first sacker, are trying out for the 
team again. Ben once struck out eighteen 
in one game which is still the existing 
club record. Newell is known as the 
"Dinuba Flash". 

A new recruit, Al Hing, shows promise 
and if Eli Eng develops fast, he will be 
retained on the team. With the veterans 
hitting hard so early in the season and 
rounding into shape rapidly, Wa Sung 
will present a formidable aggregation for 
the coming season. 



The Chinese Students' Club of the Uni- 
versity of California met lr.st Friday eve- 



YOUNG KEE 

• 

Radio and Electrical Repairs 
—Keys Made — 

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KING OF BURLESQUE 
JAILED IN OAKLAND 

Sint Millard, the so-called king of the 
burlesque producers in San Francisco, 
spent a night in jail in Oakland last week 
when he made a speech in a Chinese 
restaurant about "Cossack police me- 
thods." 

Millard protested the price of the chop 
suey (thirty five cents) and argued with 
the Chinese proprietor vigorously. Two 
officers responded to the call for police, 
who insisted that Millard pay the check, 
which he did. The "cossack speech" fol- 
lowed, and Millard found himself in jail 
on a drunk charge. 



ning and outlined tentative plans for the 
rest of the semester. Because the last 
skating affair was a success and complied 
with insistent demands, the club will give 
another skating party within the next 
few weeks. Arrangements are being 
made with the Oakland Rollerland to 
reserve the pavilion on the evening of 
Tuesday, March 17. 

On April 4, the annual Spring In- 
formal dance is to be presented at the 
International House in Berkeley. A prime 
favorite, Lee Hamlin and his eleven piece 
orchestra, who played for the Bear-Tro- 
jan dance, will again provide sophisti- 
cated syncopation from nine to one. The 
price of admission is $1.20 a couple. 

The following evening many of the 
students and their friends attended the 
Big C Sirkus in the Gymnasium. Among 
those seen swirling on the crowded dance 
floor were Henry Moon, a teaching fel- 
low at the University, and Lona Lowe. 
Ed Owyang and Alice Lee came over 
from San Francisco to weave in and out 
of the paths of the dancers. Bill Jing. 
president of the Students' Club, and Jes- 
sie Fung were too absorbed in each other 
to mind the bumps and jars. 

Glenn Lym and Flo DyFoon and 
Frank Lim and Alice Lum were lost in 
the crowd. The foursome, Worley Wong, 
Ada Chan, Davie Lee and Jean Lym un- 
ashamedly admitted they cheated on the 
nickel jigs. Stanton Yee and Jeancttc 
Dun sat on the top row in the balcony 
and did not dance till late. Kai Kim. 
interclass boxing champion at 118 lbs., 
and a party of friends were also in the 
balcony watching the milling dancers 
Art Chong had a Rose Young in tow. 

Despite the congestion, everyone de- 
clared that Don Mulford's music mi 
grand. 
and Better Paper 



Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 5 



TEA AN D LANTERNS 



CLARA CHAN 



OUR SOCIAL-GO-ROUNDS 

We see that we don't have to look very 
far for entertainment when right in our 
little community there is going to be lots 
to do, see, and hear this month. Wah 
Ying Club started this Spring fever by 
throwing a sport dance last Saturday and 
the epidemic is now on. After haviilg 
attended formal functions this Winter 
in trailing gowns, it was a relief to be 
doing all the latest hop, skip, and jumps 
in sport clothes. Now I see why it has 
been so hard to get the boy friend to 
wear his tuxedo to dances. It was a good 
thing the fellows decided against N. S. 
G. S. because only as spacious a place as 
the Trianon Hall would hold the 500 
guests that dropped in at the first dance 
given by this club. We hung around 
the punch on star-board side or was it 
the other bowl on port-side. 

Juliet Carter did a solo number; she 
was supposed to do a bolero dance, but 
at the last minute sans costume she gra- 
ciously and gracefully won the hearty 
applause with a soft-shoe dance. 

We would have consumed more of the 
punch at the dance if we didn't a calling 
go to Dot's, the new dress shop on Jack- 
son Street. The Misses Marie and Gladys 
Tom and Mrs. Franklin invited their 
friends for a look-see and a repartee of 
ice cream and cakes on their opening day 
Saturday, Feb. 29. A cozy little shop, 
with a friendly atmosphere, we can see 
where our mioney will go. 



Stealing the secretarial book from 
Hattie, I read the minutes of the last 
meeting of the Chitena Club. The ten- 
nis year has been changed from June to 
March. The new officers this year are: 
president, Dr. Theodore Lee; vice-presi- 
dent, H. K. Wong; secretary, Hattie Hall; 
treasurer, Edward Chan; manager, Wal- 
ter Wong. Directors: Hayne Hall, Kern 
Loo, Joe Moke, John Tseng, William 
Louie. Tennis coach, Fred Mar. 

Already the members and new officers 
are starting a campaign drive to enlist 
members and make tennis stars of them. 
Watch for the men with a stack of 4 by 6 
cards. By the way, they are going to 
have another of their howlingly successful 
parties real soon. We hear that bridge 
and dancing will be at Kern's; so we had 
better brush up on Culbertson unless you 
have faith in psychic bids and under- 
stand the art of "trapping". 

About this epidemic of Spring fever, 
conduced by sunny skies the past weelc, 
it has spread to the East Bay region. The 

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Chinese Youth Circle will be drawing a 
capacity crowd tomorrow nite, Mar. 7, 
at the Persian Garden in Oakland. They 
promise us a good dance, with good mu- 
sic, cozy atmosphere, dif'rent door prizes, 
and a 'rare, rare one' — admission, 15 
cents, not quite two bits. 



To inaugurate the first day of Spring, 
the Chinese Y. W. C. A. will give the 
girls a chance to wear their new organ- 
dies or gingham gowns on March 21 
when a dance will be held in the heart of 
no woman's land. The Cathayans will 
show us where the music comes out, with 
youthful and popular Miss Frances Chun 
as their feature warbler. 



By the end of March if we are not 
afficted with 'terpsidogitis' from too much 
dancing, we shall be seeing you at the 
Chinese Y. W. C. A. The 965 Club 
(only working gals eligible) is to present 
an unusual attraction in the line of enter- 
tainment. "The Big Little Broadcast" 
will be just the thing that this good- 
entertainment-starved community is look- 
ing forward to. Poo Poo, known to a 
few as Bob Poon will be the announcer 
there that nite. Until the day approaches 
will we be wondering who the future 
Bing Crosby's and Kate Smith's are, 
Leave it to Mrs. Bernice Foley to find 
the proper talent. 

Delta Club Activities 

The Delta Club, consisting of all girl 
members, recently gave its fourth annual 
party at the home of Miss Helen Wong. 
More than forty friends of the club mem- 
bers were there as guests. 

The fascinating and expressive charm 
of embroidering has captured the fancy 
of the members, so the club has voted 
to set aside every Friday night as their 
embroidery night, which also serves to 
keep the members in constant contact 



Lien Fa Saw You 

At the Big "C" Sirkus in Berkeley 
Miss Jean Lym had on a brown and 
white tweed mixture sport coat, a very 
youthful creation which was appropriate 
for the collegiate affair. Intriguing was 
her tiny colorful boutonniere of spring 
flowers. Alligator oxfords, both com- 
fortable and neat in appearance, was the 
young coed's choice; a brown felt hat 
with a small brim niftily topped off this 
smart outfit. 

Miss Rose Chew quiet and petite was on. 
her way to St. Mary's Church attired in 
a black wool suit trimmed with three inch 
bands of fine caracul. Bright red was 
her blouse with silver thread running 
through giving a dazzling effect which 
went so well with her shiny black patent 
leather shoes. A matching turban with 
a touch of the caracul went with this 
elegant suit. 

Two lovely orchids adorned a shoulder 
of Mrs. Harry Lee's (May Wong) apri- 
cot georgette gown at their wedding ban- 
quet on Monday at Shanghai Low. Tiny 
pleats trimmed the dainty neckline, short 
sleeves and hem; her sandals were of the 
same shade. Her engagement ring stud- 
ded with many diamonds form a pretty 
design; the wedding ring was a band of 
the tiny sparkling stone. Her wrap was 
a coat of moire caracul, glossy and rich 
with interesting sleeves and collar, a spe- 
cially made coat for a specially charming 
person. Assisting in the receiving line 
was Miss Bessie Lee, attractive sister of 
the groom. She had on a fitted modern 
Mandarin robe of black satin, decorated 
with large floral patterns, skillfully em- 
broidered in a brilliant red. A strikingly 
beautiful costume on a lovely personality. 

with each other. 

These embroidery bees are held at the 
home of Miss Alice Wong, 752 Stockton 
Street. 



LOCK YUEN 
Florist 

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"Flowers for Every Occasion, Prices for Every Purse" 

ORCHIDS BY SPECIAL ORDER 

Gift Buying and Magazine Subscription Bureau 
1120 STOCKTON ST. SAN FRANCISCO 




Page 6 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday,March 6, 1936 



TEA AND LANTERNS 



SEATTLE NEWS 

The Chinese Baptist Church teachers' 
held their annual rally banquet Wednes- 
day, Feb. 19, in the church banquet room. 
Approximately 14 teachers attended the 
conference to fix extensive plans for the 
ensuing months. Mrs. F. R. Leech who 
had just returned from a tour of the 
Far East, was the principal speaker. 



Miss Carrie Gon is now assisting Miss 
Cecelia Allen in conducting the church's 
kindergarten, while Hing Chinn is driv- 
ing the bus. Nearly 35 Chinese young- 
sters of pre-school age attend this instruc- 
tion class, conducted free five mornings 
a week by the church. The organization 
has been in existence since the new Chi- 
nese Baptist Church building at Ninth 
and King Street has been erected, and 
has proven advantageous to Chinese 
youngsters in that the curriculum has 
better fitted them for entrance into public 
schools. 



Mr. Lock-Tin Eng, former scoutmaster 
of Chinese Troop 54, is the new head of 
the Chinese Night School for beginners 
in English; he was appointed by the 
Washington Baptist State Convention. 



The Chinese Boy Scouts have planned 
an Easter vacation hike to Snoqualmie 
Pass. At a Patrol Leaders' Conference 
last Saturday, tentative plans were made 
to stay over two nights at the pass. As 
the pass is snow-covered the entire year 
round, the lads will have a great time 
snowballing, skiing, et al. 



Chitter Chatter 

Seen at the Tolo were: Jessie Leong 
dancing with her tall, dark, and hand- 
some; Hazel Lum, singing "I'm In The 
Mood For Love" to someone nearby, and 
getting an answering nod; Vincent Goon, 
U. of W. soph, bewildering the little 
maids with his fast line; Bashful Mary 
Luke and equally bashful Tom Hong; 
Bob Chinn doing a hula while friend 
wife scowled in vain; Boisterous Bill 
"Dopey" Chinn airing off as usual . . . 
Art Louie, stringy Young China center, 
has rejoined the team after a successful 
season on the Garfield varsity which fin- 
ished the season with 5 wins and 7 losses 
. . . Al Wong, Students substitute guard, 
is still celebrating the fact that he has 
scored points in the last three games . . . 
The David Chinn's are proud parents 
of a baby-girl, Amelia, Feb. 17 . . . The 
Chinese Girls squelched the Bellevue 
Japanese 28-9 with Jessie Doung and 

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Salinas Chinese 
Elect Officers 

The newly organized Salinas Chinese 
Club recently held an informal gather- 
ing at the home of Willie and Maye 
Chung, on Romie Lane, with the younger 
set of the city present. 

The club was organized as a means 
for informal gatherings of the young 
folks, and the group will be active in 
social and athletic affairs. 

Following are the officers: Dr. Fred 
E. Lee, president; Hughes Chin, vice- 
president; Gage Wong Jr., secretary, 
Gene Dong, treasurer; Thomas Jung, 
sergeant-at-arms; George Wong, athletic 
manager; and Stanley Chung, social 
chairman. Framing of a constitution and 
other business were discussed. The club 
plans to participate in the Y. M. C. A. 
older boys' basketball league. 

Among other members of the club are 
Frank Chin, Dorothy Chung, Francis 
Young, and Fred Mar. 

• • 

SECRET WEDDING BELLS 

Thomas Ginn of Stockton and Helen 
Jung of Oakland were reported secretly 
married in Oakland February 23. The 
couple is now residing in Stockton. 
Thomas Ginn is connected with the Bank 
of America in Stockton, and is remem- 
bered as one of the oldest Chinese ten- 
nis players among the Chinese, and still 
an enthusiast in the sport. 

Lily Chinn scoring 14 and 12 points re- 
spectively . . . The Chinese Students, 
having played games last Wednesday, 
Thursday, and Friday, are faced with 
games this coming Monday, Tuesday, 
and Wednesday, six games in eight days 
. . . Kaye Hong, giant Students center, 
sprained his ankle for the third time this 
season, and the Students are bemoaning 
his temporary loss. 



Golden Circle Anniversary 

The Golden Circle Club of the Chinese 
Presbyterian Church celebrated their 
Eleventh Anniversary last Friday, Feb. 
21, at the Church's social hall. Games, 
songs, and initiation of new members 
supplied the entertaining numbers for 
the evening's program. Inauguration of 
new officers also took place. They are: 
Laura Lai, president; Stella Yee, vice- 
president; Nellie Tom, secretary; Irene 
Lee, treasurer; and Dorothy Fidiam, ath- 
letic manager. The advisor for the group 
is Miss Flora Hubbard. 
• • 

Monterey Dance Big Success 

Monterey's Chinese dance last Friday, 
Feb. 28, for the Chung Wah School 
benefit held at the Ocean View Hotel 
has been reported a great success. A 
ten-piece orchestra of the Monterey High 
School furnished the music. 

Francis Gee and Florence Wu were 
the charming hostesses. During inter- 
missions, there were tap dancing and 
acrobatics entertainment. A special nov- 
elty number in Gentlemen Waltz was won 
by Willie Chung and Thomas Jung, while 
the Lady Waltz was won by Alice Shew 
and Dorothy Lee. 

Among the out-of-towners present 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Dong, Betty 
Eng, Mary Lee, Parker Chan, Earl Goon, 
Billy Lee and Ernest Yee of Watsonville; 
and Maye Chung, David Chung, Stanley 
Chung, Albert Lee, Dr. Fred Lee, James 
Leong, Jack Lew, Fred Mar, Victor 
Schoon, Gage Wong, Gage Wong Jr., 
Diamond Yee and Edward Chan of Sa- 
linas. 



The Chinese Students and the Baptist 
Rogers Williams clubs, both U. of W 
organizations, held a joint social Friday 
evening, Feb. 28, at Eagleson Hall. Co- 
chairmen were Miss Margaret Bristol and 
Mr. Edwin Luke. The feature event of 
the evening was a basketball game be- 
tween teams representing the two clubs, 
which found the Baptist five on the long 
end of a 32-26 score. However, the 
Students performed without the services 
of their scintillating center, Kaye Hong. 
Ray Wong and Vince Goon of the Young 
China squad, and both U students, per- 
formed for the Chinese. A good time 
was had by all. 
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Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Pag« 7 



CHINATOWNIA 



Japanese Propaganda 
in Text Books 

V. S. McClatchy, secretary of the Cali- 
fornia Joint Immigration Committee, last 
week charged that a school text book filled 
with misrepresentations and propaganda 
favoring Japan is being urged for public 
schools in California and other main- 
land states. 

Mr. McClatchy declared that the book, 
dealing with Japan's history, is in use 
in Honolulu public schools in spite of 
protests. The authors have been reported 
as making strenuous efforts to have it 
endorsed by teachers' organizations 
throughout the United States. 

Exhibits in support of the charges have 
been filed with Vierling Kersey, state 
superintendent of public instruction, sta- 
ted Mr. McClatchy. 

These are part of the charges for mis- 
representations, "One brief paragraph 
has been presented by the author to cover 
the policies, activities and international 
relations of Japan during the present 
century, dealing with the conquest of 
Manchuria, creation of the puppet state 
of "Manchukuo", siege of Shanghai and 
the occupation of North China districts. 

"During the World War and after- 
wards Japan played a part in China 
utterly different than anything previously 
known. Japan entered actively into the 
internal affairs of that great and disor- 
ganized country, imposing the twenty- 
one demands of 1915, and beginning an 
economic penetration in it by lending 
money and opening factories." 

• • 

ORGANIZED DEMONSTRATION 
AGAINST JAPAN 

Protesting against Japanese military 
aggression and warning Japanese war 
lords of their aggressive action against 
China, Russia and Mongolia, an organ- 
ized demonstration took place in New 
York City last Saturday in front of the 
Japanese Consulate. About 200 patrol- 
men and mounted police were on duty to 
prevent possible disturbances. 

Two members of the American League 
Against War were permitted to go into 
the Consulate with resolutions and a 
warning that millions of people would 
be aroused to defend the invaded people. 

• • 

CHINESE SCOUTS HOLD RALLY 

An opening rally was held by the Troop 
Three Division "C" Scouts at the Chi- 
nese Y. M. C. A. last Friday night. A 
hike was planned for the near future. 
It was decided that the "C" division will 
take charge of "D" division. The ever- 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 

The Chinese Students Association is 
planning its first dance of the year at the 
Montebello Women's Club on the 21st 
of March. It will be a big affair for 
the students and their friends. Miss El- 
sie Young of U. S. C. is the social chair- 
man of the Association and in charge 
of arrangements for the "Collegiate 
Prom". The other committees in charge 
are: 

floor and door, Eugene Choy of U. S. C; 
music, Margy Leung of U. S. C; 
program, Morgan Lee of C. O. P. S.; 
refreshments, Frances Quon of L.A.J .C. ; 
invitations, Bernice Louie of L. A. J. C; 
finance and tickets, Richard H. Wong 
of C. O. P. S.; 

clean up, Lim P. Lee of U. S. C; 
publicity, Lincoln Leung of U. C. L. A.; 
location, Bill Got of L. A. J. C. 



The Tri Y Girls' club of Los Angeles 
gave a leap year party to their boy 
friends on Feb. 29th at the Y. W. C. A. 
The party started with an appetizing din- 
ner at six o'clock with 35 persons par- 
taking of the meal . . . After the dinner 
a snappy program in charge of Misses 
Aldrina Lamb and Maisie Dong was pre- 
sented . . . The rest of the evening was 
spent in dancing in true 1936 fashion, 
giving the boys the privilege of accept- 
ing or refusing a chivalrous young lady's 
request for a dance. The boys were, "of 
course, thoroughly enjoying themselves 
when the evening came to a close . . . 
Then the party moved out to Ocean Park 
Beach, and thus ended a perfect leap 
year party! 

popular finale to any social gathering 
took place when refreshments were served 
to the group of almost forty. 



WE Do- 
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Enlarging 




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615 Jackson Street 

San Francisco, California 



Chinese Survey Started 

A Chinese survey under the supervision 
of the International Institute and the 
Chinese Congregational Church is to be- 
gin in March. 

At present the services of two social 
workers from the W P. A. project have 
been obtained. These two workers will 
be trained in visitation and observation 
technique by Rev. T. T. Taam. They are 
to make house to house visits and obtain 
information concerning the religious be- 
lief, church and club affiliations, and so- 
cial and economic standings, especially 
of the young people. 

"Our Christian program will be based 
on the findings of this survey. By con- 
tacting the Chamber of Commerce, the 
language schools of the Chinese com- 
munity, and the Chinese newspapers of 
San Francisco, we hope that the Chinese 
people in Los Angeles will cooperate to 
make the survey a success," announced 
Rev. Taam. 

In case the families do not understand 
English, the young people of the Con- 
gregational Church will fill out the ques- 
tionaires that will be used. 

The survey is to be completed in six 
months. Mr. Lim P. Lee of the Metho- 
dist Church is also on the committee. 



Just imagine a cold, rainy night. Pic- 
ture yourself before an indoor fireplace. 
Add sizzling, juicy hot-dogs, pickles, hot 
rolls, mustard, tea, and toasted marsh- 
mallows to your picture and what do you 
have? A real wienie-bake without sand. 
That is just what the Tennis Club cabinet 
members enjoyed following their busi- 
ness meeting. 

For the purpose of planning the club 
activities for the future, the cabinet met 
last week at the home of Dr. L. Y. Lee. 

The first general meeting lead by the 
new officers will be held on March 15, at 
N. S. G. S. Hall. It will be in honor of 
Dr. Edward Lee, the outgoing president 
who has served the club most distinguish- 
ly for two years. The social gathering 
will be followed by refreshments. 

There will be a beginners' tennis class 
on March 22 at Elysian Park for mem- 
bers. 



Miss Rose Lamb will be the hostess 
to the Mei Wah girls this week-end (Mar. 
7-8) at Big Pines. Food and transporta- 
tion was arranged at the last meeting of 
the Mei Wah club. Mrs. Thomas S. 
Wong is the advisor of the club. 



P«K« S 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, March 6, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THE CHINESE DIGEST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, $2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, #2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 



STAFF 



CHING WAH LEE . 
WILLIAM HOY __ 



FRED GEORGE WOO 

CLARA CHAN 

ETHEL LUM 



ROBERT G. POON 



Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Sports 

Fashions 

-Community Welfare 
Circulation 



CORRESPONDENTS 


AND REPRESENTATIVES 


Los Angeles _ 


William Cot, Elsie Lee 


Oakland 


Hector Eng, Ernest Loo 


Portland _ _ 


-...Eva Moe, Edgar Lee 


Seattle 


Eugene Wong, Edwin Luke 


Salinas 




Bakersfield 




Watsonville 




Fresno _ 







A PREPOSTEROUS TRUTH? 

In an editorial last Friday, February 28, the San 
Francisco Chronicle declared, "It is altogether likely 
that the recent incidents on the outer Mongolia frontier 
have been put-up jobs by Japanese army subalterns, 
without orders but with a certainty that the army was 
behind them, for the purpose of bringing on war be- 
tween Japan and Russia. 

"Increased power of the military clique in Tokyo 
will encourage this process. The Japanese army is 
hot to drive farther into China and to pick a fight with 
Russia before the bear gets too strong." 

We believe the Chronicle editorial hit the right spot. 
It sounds preposterous, but nevertheless, it seems to be 
true. 



THE WARNING VOICE WITHIN 

Let not a man do what his sense of right bids him 
not do, nor desire what it forbids him to desire. This 
is sufficient. The skillful artist will not alter his mea- 
sures for the sake of a stupid workman. 

When right ways disappear, one's person must van- 
ish with one's principles. 

The honor which man confers is not a true honor. 
Those to whom Chaou Mang gave rank, he can degrade 
again. He whose good name comes from what he is, 



A "GOOD NEIGHBOR POLICY?" 

The March 2nd issue of the San Francisco Chronicle 
published on its editorial page, an article headed, "Our 
Silver Losses Fine For Foreign Speculators". 

According to records, America bought fifty million 
ounces of silver from China on an agreement price of 
sixty five cents an ounce, the agreement signed last 
November. However, when the sale was made, the 
price had fallen to less than forty-five cents an ounce, 
"Thus China made a neat profit of about #10,000,000 
at the expense of the American taxpayer." 

The #10,000,000 profit can hardly be compared with 
the huge losses and economic condition that America, 
through her silver purchase plan, has heaped upon 
China, one of the largest users of silver in the world. 

America is on the road to recovery. (The American 
taxpayer hardly has much cause for complaint now.) 

But think of the huge load the Chinese taxpayer has 
on his hands! 



GRASSHOPPER MINDS 

You know this person as well as you know yourself. 
His mind nibbles at everything, yet never masters eny- 
thing. 

At work, he always takes up the easiest thing to do, 
puts it down when it proves too difficult, and starts to 
do something else. He jumps from one thing to another 
all the time. 

At home in the evenings, he tunes in on the radio, 
tires of it — then glances through a magazine or news- 
paper, can't get interested. Finally, unable to concen- 
trate on anything, he either takes in a movie show or 
falls asleep in his seat. 

There are thousands of people in the world with 
grasshopper minds. They do the world's most tiresome 
work, yet get a pittance for their labor. People with 
such minds are hindrances and detrimental to the com- 
munity. Anyone with a grasshopper mind should 
do something about it. 

needs no trappings. 

The ancients cultivated the nobility of Heaven, leav- 
ing that of men to follow in its train. Serving Heaven 
consists in nourishing the real constitution of our be- 
ing, anxious neither about death nor life. — Mencius. 



Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINESE OIC EST 



Paga 9 



CULTURE 



— CHINGWAH LEE 



CERAMIC ART 

(XIII) SOME STANDARD REFER- 
ENCES ON CHINESE CERAMICS 

There are scores of books on Chinese 
porcelain and pottery in the English lan- 
guage, but unfortunately, many are writ- 
ten with more enthusiasm than know- 
ledge on this fascinating art. There are, 
nevertheless, a good dozen which may 
be considered outstanding and should be 
in the hands of students. The "big four" 
among collectors are the works of Hob- 
son and Heatherington which are given 
below. They are very hard to obtain 
as only limited copies were made, but 
may be found in the reserve shelves of 
most libraries. They make their appear- 
ances occasionally in auction rooms, the 
hammer falling close to the fifty dollar 
mark for each volume. 

l.THE EARLY CERAMIC WARES OF 
CHINA, by A. L. Heatherington. This 
covers ceramics from the Chow Dynasty 
to the end of the Yuan Dynasty, detailed 
special chapters being devoted to the 
wares of the Han, the T'ang, and the 
Sung Dynasties. This volume was pro- 
duced before the important discoveries 
or Anderson, and so is somewhat silent 
on the prehistoric Chinese pottery (such 
as the Yang Shao period wares) . The 
work includes one hundred illustrations 
of which twelve are in colour. New 
York, 1922, Charles Scribner's Sons. 

2. THE WARES OF THE MING, by 

R- L. Hobson, Keeper of the Department 
of Ceramics and Ethnography, British 
Museum. This covers in great detail the 
work of the Ming potters, special em- 
phasis being placed on the designs and 
on the three main types of Ming pro- 
duction, the san tsai, or three colors, the 
wu tsai or polychromes, and the under- 
glazes (both cobalt blue and copper red). 
Contains one hundred and twenty illu- 
strations, of which eleven are in colour. 
New York, 1923, Charles Scribner's Sons. 

3. THE LATER CERAMIC WARES OF 

CHINA, by R. L. Hobson. This is un- 
doubtedly the greatest work, in any lan- 
guage, on the wares of the Ch'ing Dy- 
nasty, dealing with the blue and white, 
the famille verte, famille rose, and mono- 
chromes of the three great periods of 
the Ch'ing Dynasty — the K'ang Hsi, 
Yung Cheng, and Ch'ien Lung periods.. 
The work includes seventy six plates illu- 
strating more than a hundred marvelous 
specimens, many of which are in colour. 



The nearest rival to this book is an earlier 
work by the same author ("Chinese Pot- 
tery and Porcelain") which deals with 
Chinese ceramics from the earliest time 
down to the present. New York, Charles 
Scribner's Sons, 1925. 

4. THE ART OF THE CHINESE POT- 
TERS, by Hobson and Heatherington. 
This is a companion to the above three, 
and is really an album of plates illu- 
strating more than a hundred specimens, 
many of which are in colour. There is 
a brief description for each ware, des- 
cribing the size, shape, and main charac- 
teristics. The introduction brings forth 
in highlights the main achievements of 
the Chinese potters. The authors be- 
lieve that this album of plates can best 
illustrate ithe main types of Chinese cer- 
amics through the long history of pot- 
tery in China; and in this they succeeded 
wonderfully. (To be continued next 
week.) 

• • 

A son was born on Feb. 24 to the wife 
of Jorlick H. Quon, 154 Waverly Place, 
San Francisco. 

• • 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 



CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Goods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 



BOWEN SALES CO. 

Fountain Service 

800 Webster Street 

Oakland, Calif. 



Remember When? 



Remember when anyone who could 
speak pidgeon English was entitled to call 
himself a "chut-fon" (interpreter) or a 
"ma-jin (merchant)? 

The earliest wave of Chinese reaching 
California were true pioneers, and like 
pioneers the world over, were not noted 
for their scholastic attainments. How- 
ever, many proved great organizers, and 
all of them were adventurous. As they 
formed lodges, tongs, and business firms, 
their needs for administrators and clerks 
became apparent, so scholars (sin-soung) 
were invited from China at fat salaries. 
However, it did not take the pioneers 
long to realize that these "brain trusters" 
were not resourceful executives. 

The second wave included many mer- 
chants, and the best of these had had 
some ten or fifteen years of Chinese edu- 
cation "under their belt". But their know- 
ledge of the English language was re- 
stricted to a dozen or two of strong 
phrases, the mildest being "you betche 
lie". 

Soon the missions established night 
schools, and years later, the Yuen Tung 
Siu Hok (Oriental Public Grammar 
School) was founded, with a handful of 
pupils attending. Those who have had 
tiwo or three years of study were looked 
upon with the same awe as we do the 
Rhodes scholars today. The parents of 
some of the first grammar school gradu- 
ates had photographs taken of ther dip- 
lomas (mun pung) for framing, putting 
the original in the safe. Photographic 
copies were sent to China to be placed 
in the village temples, and banquets were 
held both here and abroad. Even as late 
as 1915 there were less than fifty attend- 
ing high schools and less than a score 
were in the universities (not counting 
those who came from China). Today, 
all children attend some grade school, 
and the number attending high schools 
and universities have increased ten fold. 
• • 

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Page 10 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday.March 6, 1936 



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POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



The newcomers from Watsonville sure 
do rate. Now we see Ernie Yee stepping 
hi around town. Whom did we see him 
with at "The Night in the Big House" 
cabaret? 



Imbued with wanderlust, we found 
Mrs. On L. Lee in Marysville with her 
sister, Mrs. Quong Lee, visiting their 
grandmother. 



The depression is over, it seems. One 
gay lothario from Marysville recently 
came to town and literally bought out 
one of the finer men's clothing stores. 
Or is it because he wanted to make an 
impression on someone. Whether he 
made an impression or not, he certainly 
made a dent in his pocketbook. 



For the first time in a long long time, 
Coach Lee Yuen was seen at a dance. 
Do you know the reason why he was not 
present when the awards were made at 
the Wah Ying Dance? He calculated 
that since the awards were scheduled for 
1 1 o'clock he would not be late if he 
came at 11:30, as undoubtedly it would 
be held CHINESE time. To his surprise, 
they crossed him up. 



Visiting San Francisco for a few days 
were Mr. and Mrs. Lin Chin. Maybe he 
was returning the visit of his kin who 
went down several days ago. 



Tony Chew was so interested in the 
playful antics of a reveler at the Wah 
Ying Dance that he forgot he was chew- 
ing gum and swallowed it. Gosh, Tony, 
it must have been some fun, eh, keed? 

Since I graciously acceded to an em- 
bryo doctor's wish, I have received an- 
other 'offer'. This one is from a would-be 
dentist; he wants to work on my teeth. 
With such experimentations going on, 
I feel that I an rapidly becoming a 
human guinea pig (although I have been 
called worse) ! 



Ever heard this one from Ming Gee, 
the "Baffling Mystifier"? 

He says: "Card tricks are always en- 
joyable and everyone likes to have a few 
of them on hand for suitable occasions. 
Some of the best tricks with cards require 
no skill whatever. Here is one. Follow 
the directions with a pack of cards, and 
you will be surprised at the ease with 
which you will learn them." 
Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger 



Y. ML C. A. RALLY 

The Chinese Y. M. C. A. will hold its 
first rally for all clubs this Saturday eve- 
ning, at 7:00 p m. A very interesting 
program is being prepared by the various 
clubs. All boys between the ages of 9 
and 15 are invited to the program. The 
Y-Clubs with their leaders are as follows: 
Harmonica club, Teddy Lee; Art-Crafts 
clubs, Wahso Chan; tap-dancing, Teddy 
Lee; model-aeronauts, Tong Wing-Ivan 
Woo; Y-Square Fellows, Wahso Chan; 
Y-Blue Eagles, Frank Wong; Y-Wolf 
Club, Roy S. Tom; Y-Tiger Club, Leland 
Crichton; Y-Hawks, Fred Lee; Y-Flying 
Eagles, David K. Lee; Camera Clubs, 
Sam Yin-Eddie Jung; Y-Bulldogs, Wil- 
liam Wong; Y-Golden Bears, Philip Le- 
ong. 

Each club has a membership of from 
15 to 60, and some have two or three 
divisions, divided into age groupings. 
Aside from the Special Interest clubs, the 
clubs have a well balanced program of 
development in Mind, Body, Spirit, and 
Social phases of a boy's life. All clubs 
are open for membership to boys, regard- 
less of club, church, or Y. M. C. A. affili- 
ations. There are absolutely no com- 
pulsory fees attached to any one of these 
clubs. 

A Magic Discovery 

Lay ten cards in a row, face down, 
and invite a person to move any number 
of cards from the left end oi the row to 
the right, moving one at a time. This 
is done while your back is turned and, 
of course, the person can slide the cards 
back so as to keep the row in its same 
relative position. The system is simple. 
After the cards are moved, turn up the 
card at the right of the row and you will 
reveal the number moved. A clever 
thing about this trick is that you can 
repeat it immediately by simply putting 
the card face down and turning your 
back. To do this, remember the card 
you turned up: suppose it was a four. 
Since you turned up the first card on 
the right, you must now add four to one 
and the next time turn up the fifth card 
from the right. This will reveal the 
number moved on the second transfer. 

How cards are arranged: 
Start — Ace 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. All cards 

face down. 
First move, 4 cards: 5 6 7 8 9 10 Ace 

2 3 4 (turn up 4). 
Second move, 3 cards: 8 9 10 Ace 2" 3 

4 5 6 7 (turn up 3) . 

"Really simple," says Ming. 
• • 

A son was born on Feb. 17 to the wife 
of George W. Chew, 63 2 Madison St., 
Oakland. 
and Better Paper 



Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Page 11 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



MANDARIN CLASS 

Those who attended the Mandarin 
Class at the Chinese Y. W. C. A. were 
astounded at the increasing attendance. 
If the class continues to grow at such an 
accelerated pace, it will not be long be- 
fore an additional period wil be neces- 
sary. 

When Mrs. Jane Kwong Lee, co-or- 
dinator of the Y. W. C. A., secured the 
cooperation of Chinese Consul-General 
C. C. Huang to organize a class for the 
study of the national tongue, she antici- 
pated difficulty in interesting as many 
as twenty individuals. At the first meet- 
ing on Jan. 31, nineteen were present, 
and the class was started with Mr. H. J. 
Shih as instructor. Mr. Shih is the chan- 
cellor of the Chinese Consulate in San 
Francisco and English editor of the Chi- 
nese Nationalist Daily. 

News of the class spread until, at the 
fifth meeting on Feb. 27, 55 students had 
been enrolled. Mere number alone is suf- 
ficient to show how much the forward 
looking members of the community rea- 
lize the importance and necessity of learn- 
ing Mandarin. 

The diversity of dialects in the spoken 
language, giving rise to sectional feelings 
and differences in habits and custom, 
has been one of the great obstacles to 
a unified China. The lack of means of 
transportation and the high percentage 
of illiteracy among the common people 
have been responsible for the many dia- 
lects. The community in San Francisco, 
which is almost entirely composed of 
Cantonese, experiences no little embar- 
rassment and inconvenience whenever re- 
nowned visitors from other provinces of 
China come to Chinatown. 

Children enrolled in the Chinese eve- 
ning schools study Mandarin as part of 
their curriculum. The present class is 
conducted for the benefit of young pe- 
ople and adults. The enrollment includes 
both sexes of a wide age range. To keep 
up the interest of such a heterogeneous 
group, Mr. Shih has invited several 
prominent Chinese guests to address the 
group in Mandarin. These talks have 
helped greatly to accustom the listeners 
to the Mandarin accent and intonations. 

"The Common People's Thousand 
Characters Textbook" is used, daily study 
of which will enable the student to mas- 
ter a thousand characters in four months. 
It is written in conversational style, and 
offers to the student of Mandarin a fair- 
sized vocabulary of standardized Chinese. 

The class is held every Thursday eve- 
Patronize Our 



CHINESE YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
BREAKFAST GROUP 

Every Sunday morning, a group of 
enthusiastic Chinese young men and wo- 
men gather together for the purpose of 
enjoying a social breakfast, of discussion 
and study on topics of current interest. 
Members from the various churches 
"sacrifice" additional hours of morning 
sleep to participate in these fellowship 
meetings, bringing with them many 
friends who are not frequenters of any 
church. 

Utilizing the noon and evening meals 
as pretexts for assembly is an old prac- 
tise, but meeting around the breakfast 
table is just beginning to gain popularity 
among the Christian young people of 
Chinatown. Prior to 1933, the young 
people of the Chinese Congregational 
Church started holding these breakfast 
meetings, from which the present group 
is evolved. After the first Chinese Young 
People's Christian Conference at Lake 
Tahoe in 1933, it was decided that the 
best way to perpetuate the fellowship and 
inspiration of the conference is to unite 
the different denominational groups in 
such weekly gatherings. Since then, these 
breakfast meetings have functioned re- 
gularly and have been of great interest 
to those who attend. 

The members congregate at the Chi- 
nese Y. W. C. A. at 9:00 o'clock Sunday 
morning. A simple breakfast is prepared 
and served by the members themselves 
at a small individual cost. The meeting 
opens with a short devotional service of 
scriptural reading, hymns, and a spiritual 
lesson. A talk on some selected topic, 
either by an outside speaker or a member 
of the group, is given, followed by ques- 
tions and informal discussions. 

ning from 8:30 to 9:30. Instruction is 
given free, and new members are still 
welcome. 



5 

I 



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T AO YUAN 
RESTAURANT 

• 

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Advertisers— -7 'hey Help to Make This a Bigger and 



Religion, science, literature, political 
and current events, and social problems 
are the main fields of interest. Talks on 
the present conditions in China, book 
reviews given by the members, study of 
"second-generation" problems, and dis- 
cussion of student activities stimulate 
thought and are educational as well. The 
aim is to bring out from the members 
themselves what contributions in learn- 
ing or thought they can offer. There is 
no attempt to confine the attention of 
the group to any one field. 

A small number of able leaders form 
the nucleus of this group. Interest in the 
weekly gatherings has become so wide- 
spread that although the membership is 
in part revolving in nature, the average 
attendance is as large as 30. The spirit 
of these people is indicative of the grow- 
ing interest among young people in the 
work of the churches. 

Many have enjoyed the freedom that 
is provided them to present to a group 
of open-minded people, their views on 
present-day social and religious issues. 
Religious differences in creed or doctrine 
are no barriers to the free discussion and 
exchange of ideas. 

To those who are not church members, 
the breakfast meetings are a convenient 
stepping stone for winning them to Chris- 
tian service for the community. Accord- 
ing to Rev. Leong Bing Yee, pastor of 
the Chinese Congregational Church, and 
a loyal member of the breakfast group, 
during the past two years there has been 
a greater participation of Chinese young 
people in church activities, with a shar- 
ing of more church responsibilities. 
• • 

"Forward with Christ," was selected as 
the year's theme for the Chinese Chris- 
tian Young People's Union at a recent 
meeting of the Union council. With re- 
newed zeal, the council is working for 
bigger and better union meetings and 
for readier cooperation among the young 
people of the various churches. 

In order not to coincide with the re- 
gular Union Church meetings, the young 
people Union Fellowship Services have 
been transferred to the first Sunday eve- 
ning of each month. The coming meet- 
ing, scheduled for March 8, 1936, at 
7:00 p. m. at the Chinese Baptist Church, 
15 Waverly Place, will feature a special 
Negro program. Guests from the Third 
Baptist Negro Church will render Negro 
spirituals and give two short talks. At 
8 p. m., after the service, a social hour 
of games, songs, and refreshments will 
add zest to the evening's program. 
Better Paper 



Page 12 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday,March 6, 1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo • 



St. Mary's A. C. Wins 
Double Header 

Before a huge crowd, the St. Mary's 
A. C. in its first appearance, sprung a 
surprise by trimming the Chan Ying 
hoop team, 35-19, at the French Court 
last Sunday evening. The Saint twenties 
nosed out the Red and Grey Club, a 
quintet composed of former Lingnan U- 
niversity students, 16-11, in the prelim- 
inary, to cop both ends of a double-bill. 

The winners piled up a lead of 8-2 at 
the end of the first quarter. The Chan 
Yings rallied, however, tying the score 
at 8-all. The half ended in another tie- 
9-9. 

Coach Ong Wah's boys jumped into 
the lead 11-9 at the opening of the third 
quarter. Baskets by Park Lee, Henry 
Whoe and Jimmy Chew put the Saints 
back into the lead, which they held 
throughout, widening the margin in the 
last ten minutes of play. 

For Coach Victor Wong's Saints, Hen- 
ry Whoe captured high scoring honors 
by chalking up eleven points, with Cap- 
tain Jimmy Chew and Paul Mark turn- 
ing out fine all-around performances. Wil- 
liam Chan and Charles Louie were the 
Chan Yings' mainstays. 

Park Lee with nine points and Dan 
Chan were the stars for the Saint 120's 
in defeating the collegians. For the los- 
ers, Jack Ng was outstanding in both 
offense and defense. Half score favor- 
ed the winners 9-2. 

• • 

Chinese "Y" Pool 
Tourney Ends 

Final results of the Chinese Y. M. 
C. A. branch of the City-wide Billiard 
Tourney was announced two days ago. 
The winners for the different classes are: 
18 years and over, beginners, George 
Ong, with Ted Moy second; 18 and over, 
class B, Fred Yee with Ernest Look se- 
cond; 18 and over, class C, Albert Young 
with Charles Fung second; 16-17, Leo 
Lew; 14-15, Edward Fung; 12-13, Wal- 
lace Lee; and 10-11, Norman Ong. 

Winners of the 18 years of age and 
over will compete in the city tournament 
for billiard cues and medals, which will 
be donated by the National Billiard Asso- 
ciation. 

• • 

Oakland's Crusaders hoopmen defeated 
the National Dollar five of Oakland, 
25-21 last week. Chester Fong starred 
for the winners. 



Chess Winners Announced 

Edward Chan Sue won the Chinese 
Chess Tournament which was conducted 
by the Chinese Y. M. C. A., concluded 
last Sunday. As a result, Chan was 
awarded a set of imitation ivory Chinese 
chess and a Y. M. C. A. badge. 

Second place was won by Thomas Chan 
Gat Ling, who will be given a set of chess 
also. Forty-one entrants competed in the 
tournament. 

• • 

CHINESE BOYS OUT 
FOR TRACK AT POLY 

Funston G. Lum, who broadjumped 
twenty feet last year in the lightweights, 
will again try for the track team this sea- 
son, according to his coach, Perry Kit- 
tredge, of Polytechnic High School. Al- 
though there will be no broad-jump in 
the 120-lb. division this year, Lum will 
keep at his favorite event, with hopes of 
making the Varsity squad. 

Two other boys are at present work- 
ing out also with the track squads. They 
are Arthur Chin, in the 130-lb. division, 
and Martin H. Louie, of the twenties. 
More Chinese boys are expected to sign 
up after the rainy days. 

• • 

YOUNG CHINESE 115's 
WIN LEAGUE TILT 

By a final count of 28-21, the Young 
Chinese Club 115's of Oakland defeated 
the Fruitvale Boys' Club in the All-Na- 
tions League at the Jewish Community 
Center last Thursday. 

Trailing 18-13 at the half intermission, 
the Oakland boys came back strong in 
the second half to overwhelm their op- 
ponents. George Chan, Shane Lew, AI- 
vin Chan, Eddie Tom, Ray Yin, Eddie 
Wong and Henry Chung were the Chi- 
nese who played. 

• • 

Shangtai meets U. C. 130's tonight 
(Friday) for the division title in the P. 
A. A. The game starts at 7:30 at the 
Civic Auditorium as a preliminary to 
the Y. M. I. vs. St. Mary's College P. A. 
A. finals. 

• • 



Van Wormer 8C Rodrigues, Inc. 

Manufacturing Jewelers 

Club Pins and Rings 

Trophies and Medals 

0<=>© 

126 Post Street 
KEarny 7109 
San Francisco 



Young Chinese Beats 
Peninsula Five 

Oakland's Young Chinese Club quint- 
et journeyed to Palo Alto last Saturday, 
Mar. 1, to administer a 35-22 defeat to 
the Bombers five. In the preliminary the 
Young Chinese Juniors lost to the Pali- 
clique Club, 24-12. 

Key Chinn chalked up 17 points, fol- 
lowed by Shane Lew and Edwin Chan, 
with eight apiece, with R. Chow, A. Lee 
and G. Chan also playing a fine floor 
game. For the Palo Altoans, Howard 
Joe and Tommy Jue were outstanding 
on both defense and offense. The Young 
Chinese won with ease. 

George Chan and Eddie Tom were the 
stars for the Young Chinese lightweights. 
W. Wong, George Lee and Kenneth Lee 
played impressive ball. For Paliclique, 
Won Loy Chan, Tarn and Jue were the 
mainstays. 

• • 

HENRIETTA JUNG 
PREPARES FOR SEASON 

Although the rainy days during the 
past weeks kept her from much needed 
practice for this year's campaign, Hen- 
rietta Jung, the 12-year old Chinese net 
star who created a sensation last year 
in the State and Pacific Coast tennis 
tournament, is preparing for some stren- 
uous matches during the coming months. 

Henrietta, who is coached by Fred 
Mar, has been playing tennis but about 
a year and a half, and already has shown 
so much promise that she has been ranked 
as a future great in the tennis world. 
No less an authority than Frank Gove, 
a local professional, remarked that she 
will some day be among the best. 

Last year she gave hard-fought mat- 
ches to Wilma Hubbard, Pacific Coast 
Champion for girls under fifteen, to whom 
she lost in two sets, 6-4, 6-2. Another 
top-notch netster whom she played was 
Nancy Wolfendon. 

Quiet and unassuming, Miss Jung not 
only excels in tennis, but she is also a 
talented piano and violin player. Hen- 
rietta is a student at the Francisco Jun- 
ior High School. 

• • 

Troop Three's hundreds won the J. 
A. F. division title by defeating the 
Roughriders, while the Scout eighties won 
from the Columbia Park Boys in another 
J. A. F. tilt. The Y. M. C. A. Bulldogs 
80's, trounced the Salesians at the Salc- 
sians court, 17-4. 



iscfvj u3;i3S put) m>83iq v sttfx ■'VA' °> d t'H *"i± — sjjsi>j3,ipy utiQ Jzfuoujvj 



Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 13 



SPORTS 




Chinese Boys Star on 
Capital "Y" Teams 

Several Chinese boys are starring on 
basketball teams in the Sacramento Y. 
M. C. A. baskerball league. Four Chinese 
teams are competing in various weight 
classes. George Chan is captain of the 
Palace Market five, Charles Fong the Gen- 
eral Produce, Richard Yee the Chung 
Wa, and Walter Yee the Wa Yen champ- 
ionship team in the 110-lb class and un- 
defeated for four years. Walter's bro- 
thers, Donald and Richard, who was a 
high school star two years ago, are also 
star cagers, while another brother, Ed- 
mund, is the high scorer of the Sacra- 
mento Hi "B" team, with a total of 78 

points. 

• • 

WATSONVILLE BEATS MONTEREY 

Monterey's Chinese basketeers traveled 
to Watsonville last Wednesday and re- 
ceived a beating from the Chinese quin- 
tet of that city, 40-22. It was an easy 
victory for the winners, the second string 
playing the entire second half. Billy 
Lee with twelve points and Hubert Dong 
with ten were Watsonville's big offensive 
guns. 

• • 
SACRAMENTO TENNIS TOURNEY 

Sacramento's Chinese Students Asso- 
ciation is formulating plans for a tennis 
tournament. Any Chinese player who 
is interested is invited to compete in the 
tourney, the winners of which will play 
out of town netmen. Donald Yee is in 
charge of this coming athletic event. 

• • 

ALFRED B. CHONG 

INSURANCE 

Kansas City Life Insurance Co. 

Office SUtter 2995; Res. PRospect 8135 

111 Sutter St., San Francisco 



SPORTS SHORTS 

Two Chinese boys are playing on the 
Sacramento Senior High School "B" 
basketball team in the C. I. F. They are 
Benjamin Yuke and Edmund Yee, for- 
wards. 



Al Wong, centerfielder of Oakland 
Tech Hi, collected three hits in as many 
times at bat, banging out a double and 
two singles, against the U. C. Frosh. In 
two games so far Al's batting average 
is .857, six hits out of seven attempts at 
the plate. 



University of Washington Chinese 
cagers of Seattle boosted their season's 
record to 25 victories against ten defeats. 
We believe that's an impressive showing. 

We presume that Henry Owyang and 
Ernest Lum are aspiring to be basketball 
referees. They seem to be doing a good 
job of it so far. 



Now that they have conquered the 
Monterey and Salinas Chinese basketball 
teams, the Watsonville Chinese hoopmen 
could well claim the title of Coast Coun- 
ties Chinese Casaba Champs. 

George Wong, of the Lowa A. C. and 
Congregational Church basketball teams 
of Los Angeles, also plays for the Sun 
Wah Club of Santa Barbara. 



Fresno's Fay Wah basketball team fini- 
shed third in its league. A game is being 
arranged with the Watsonville Chinese 
five. Among the Fresno stars are Floyd 
Sam, Hiram Ching andToyWong. 



Buddy Nam and Eddie Akau starred 
for the A. C. A. basketballers, a Chinese 
team in Honolulu, in its victory over 
the Elks in a league game. 



On Mar. 15, the National Dollar five 
will tangle wi.h the National Dollar hoop- 
sters of Oakland at French Court. 



Among the Chinese boys who took 
part in the first amateur wrestling tourna- 
ment, sponsored by the Honolulu City- 
wide Athletic Association, was James 
Hung. 

By a lopsided score of 50-18, the Chi- 
nese "Y" hundreds won their last game 
of their J. A. F. schedule by walloping 
the San Francisco Boys' Club. Johnson 
Lee, Joseph Chin, Bennie and Chew 
Young starred for the Chinese. 



SPECTACULAR CIRCUS 

On Saturady evening, March 7, the 
central Y. W. C. A., 620 Sutter St., will 
be turned into a whirling, swirling circus 
grounds when the city-wide Business 
Girls' Committee presents its SPECTAC- 
ULAR CIRCUS The features of Barn- 
um's "Greatest Show on Earth" will fade 
into insignificance beside the colossal at- 
tractions of this unique and colorful 
affair with its "'big tent" show, its side- 
shows, and its games of chance. Breath- 
taking water stunts, mysterious fortune- 
tellers, food concessions, and a real old- 
fashioned nickel-a-dance ballroom will 
lend atmosphere and add to the gayety 
of the evening. Doors open at 8 o'clock 
and from that time until midnight there 
will not be a dull moment. General ad- 
mission is fifteen cents and the public 
is invited. 

The Circus has been planned for the 
purpose of raising money to send dele- 
gates to the Y. W. C. A. National Con- 
vention which will be held in Colorado 
Springs in April. Miss Mabel Lowe is 
the 965 Club's representative on the plan- 
ning committee. 

• • 

SEATTLE WAKU CELESTIALS WIN 

Waku Celestials of Seattle, Washing- 
ton, led by Gene Luke's 15 points and 
David Woo's rugged center play, wallop- 
ed the China Club cagemen at the Bap- 
tist gym last week, 28-16. It was a rough 
and bruising game between the two vet- 
eran teams. Ray Wong and Lucas Chinn 
refereed the contest. 

• • 

An application for a marriage license 
was filed last week with the County Clerk 
by Nee Wong of San Francisco, and 
Helene B. Chang of Daly City. 




Parlor Cars for Private Clubs 
Limousines for all occasions 




781 Market St. DOuglas 0477 
San Francisco 



Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Ma/^e This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Page 14 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday.March 6, 1936 



SEATTLE LEAP YEAR TOLO 
By Mollie Locke 

When the Queen of Scotland gave wo- 
men the privilege to propose, she decreed: 
"During the reign of her maist blissit 
megeste" every "maiden ladye of both 
highe and lowe estate" should have the 
privilege each leap year "to bespeak ye 
man she likes." 

And so, after waiting four long par- 
lous years, the girls finally smoothed the 
kinks out of their calf muscles and oiled 
up their joints to jump .... no, not at 
the traditional custom of kneeling on a 
cushion and saying to the Most Wonder- 
ful Man in the World: "Darling, be 
mine" .... but to ask the boys to the 
dinner-dance held last Sunday night, 
February 23, at Riverside Inn. 

Despite the fact that the members of 
the Chinese Girls' Athletic Club declared 
that they did not plan to invite their men 
into matrimony that night (there's 314 
days yet to pop the question to the man 
she loves), the leap year tolo attracted 
twenty or more young bachelors and a 
few married couples. 

It was a pleasant and amusing affair 
and many pretty gowns -were seen. Am 
the young dancers noted here and there 
were: Miss Lilly Chin, who had on a 
black moire dress with which she wore 
a brilliant red jacket; Miss Mary Luke 
in green taffeta with gold threads; Miss 
Esther Chin in an effective dark wine 
crepe gown with gold trimmings on the 
collar and her sister, Miss Amy, in pink 
taffeta; Miss Rose Woo was in dark green 
with black contrast. Miss Josephine Chin 
chose a white lace dress for the occasion; 
Miss Eva Lee of Victoria, B .C. in pink 
net with rows of ruffles on the skirt; and 
Miss Mollie Locke in soft yellow crepe 
and rhinestones for sparkling accent in 
her hair. Among the recently married 
couples dancing with the gay colorful 



See Me Before You Buy 

ARTHUR N. DICK 

REPRESENTING 

Plymouth Chrysler 

• 

Bigger Trade-in Allowance 

Low Finance Rate 

Phones: CH 1824 or PRos. 2400 

James w. McAllister, inc. 

Van Ness at Post San Francisco 



STOCKTON WOLF CLUB BANQUET 

The Wolf Club of Stockton, a social 
organization gave a banquet at the Hotel 
Calif ornian, February 27. Two new 
members, George Louie and Gick Wong, 
were initiated. The latter is an instruc- 
tor at the Ching Wah School. Besides 
being an initiation it was also a farewell 
party to their advisor, Kwong Hoy, prom- 
inent citizen, who is returning to China 
for a short vacation. Twenty members 
were present that evening. The club is 
contemplating an invitational dance in 
the very near future. 

• • 

SOPH DANCE 

Charlotte Wong was the general chair- 
man of the sophomore class dance of the 
University of Hawaii which was given 
Feb. 22 in the college gymnasium. Music 
was furnished by the Red Hawks orches- 
tra. 

crowd were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Chin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Yuen Chin and Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Mar. From a table of much 
gaiety and laughter was a group of older 
guests but who were young in spirits; 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wong, Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Goon, Mr. and Mrs. David 
Mar and Mr. and Mrs. Dan Goon. 

Driving all the way to Seattle in the 
snow for this gala affair were Billy Wong 
and Joseph Lee of Portland. Howard 
Fung, who hails from San Francisco, a 
traveling salesman and a sociable lad, 
was also there enjoying himself to the 
utmost. 

The music went round and round and 
so did every cheerful couple until the last 
strain of music died away at two o'clock. 
Tired but happy, everyone went home- 
ward singing in the snow with memories 
of this first leap year tolo, and to the 
gentlemen . . . the fair belle who escorted 
him and presented him with a bouton- 
niere. So . . . au revoir, cheerio, or shall 
we say "good-bye" . . . 'til we come back 
with more news of the next dance in 1940. 

• • 

a G£±J2>^£F$ <fe2t^.<SLcscR) g^ja^e^Fa <? 



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FLORISTS 

• 

Bridal Bouquets, Corsages, 

Wreaths - - Funeral Decorations 

Ask For 
FRANK YOUNG 

• ■ 
120 Maiden Lane - - SUtter 2300 
san francisco, california 



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PORTLAND NEWS 

Shelton Low, a former student of Ben- 
son Polytechnic, is now enrolled in the 
Hill Military Academy, majoring in avi- 
ation. Shelton recently returned from 
China after having studied in the schools 
back there for two years. 



Jacqueline Wong, a student at U. of O. 
is now a veteran radio performer. She 
is heard over KORE in the Co-ed Quarter 
Hour. 



'KThina Speaks" by Chih Meng was 
donated to the Portland Public Library 
by Lee Kim Hong, and formally accepted 
by the association. 



The Portland Tri-Y Girls' basketball 
team defeated the Highland Baptists by 
a score of 12-11. The teams were tied up 
to the last quarter, and the winning point 
was made by Irene Chin on a foul shot. 



Mrs. Charles W. Luck and her two 
sons, Charles, Jr. and Wesley are visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. Emory Chow in Seattle, 
Washington. 



The Wah Kiang high scoring basket- 
eers including Edgar Wong, Creighton 
Tong, Benny (High man) Quan, Joe 
Wong, Norman Wong, Henry Gong and 
all-star Robert Wong, continued their 
winning streak last week by defeating 
their old enemies, the Neighborhood 
House 20-18, and the Oregon Institute 
of Technology 32-14. The latter game 
is one of the tilts in the series of elimina- 
tion matches sponsored by the Y. M. C. 
A. 

• • 

MR. and Mrs. Edward Chew moved 
to the Portsmouth Apts. on Washington 
street recently. 



Perhaps you have often wondered 
why your organization or association 
does not receive publicity on certain 
projects or announcements in the 
Chinese Digest. There is where we 
invite you to turn in reports which 
you desire to make public, and we 
will publish them as space permits. 



" S> G£^<ZT^S> Cf^ET^a^ Cf'WO* <« 
Patronize Our Advertisers— They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Friday, March 6, 1936 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Page IS 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



Kwangtung First in Roads 

Kwangtung with a total of 11,200 kilo- 
meters stands first in the length of high- 
ways in China, according to figures re- 
leased by the Bureau of Public Roads of 
the National Economic Council. 

Shantung comes second with 5,500 ki- 
lometers, Kiangsi takes third place with 
4,600 kilometers, and Anhwei ranks 
fourth with 4,200 kilometers. Kwangsi, 
Outer Mongolia, Fukien, Kiangsi, Hu- 
peh, Chekiang, and Liaoning have each 
about 3,000 kilometers, while Ninghsia, 
Kirin, Szechwan, Heilungkiang, Jehol, 
Chahar, Honan, Hunan and Shansi have 
each about 2,000 kilometers. 

Those provinces which have construct- 
ed only about 1,000 kilometers of motor 
roads each, are Hopei, Shensi, Yunnan, 
Kweichow, Sinkiang, Suiyuan, Kansu and 
Tibet. Chinghai trails behind with about 
900 kilometers, and Sikong, the new pro- 
vince, has the shortest distance of high- 
ways, which is about 500 kilometers only. 
According to investigation, most of 
the motor vehicles are running in muni- 
cipalities and business centers rather than 
in the rural districts in various provinces. 
About 50 percent of China's total num- 
ber of motor vehicles are in Shanghai, 
the largest port of the country. Hong- 
Kong, Peiping, Tientsin, Nanking, Hang- 
chow, Canton, and Tsingtao have each 
between 2,000 and 4,000 motor vehicles. 
The number of buses in China is only 
about 20 percent of her total of motor 
vehicles. By comparison, Kwangtung has 
the largest number of buses, which is 
about 4,000. Shantung ranks second with 
about 2,000. Hopei, Kirin, Liaoning, 
Heilungkiang, and Mongolia have each 
about 1,700. Chekiang, Fukien, and Ki- 
angsu, each about 800 and Kiangsi, Sze- 
chwan, Kwangsi, Jehol and Hunan, each 
about 500. All other provinces have each 
only about 100 or even less. 

According to statistics compiled by the 
Bureau for the year 1934, there is one 
motor vehicle (irrespective of descrip- 
tion) to an average of 15 kilometers of 
highways. Or more specifically, there is 
one automobile to an average of 25 kilo- 
meters, one bus to an average of 60 kilo- 
meters, one truck to an average of 90 
kilometers, and one motorcycle to an av- 
erage of 260 kilometers. 

No detailed statistics showing the op- 



erating conditions on highways in vari- 
ous provinces and municipalities are as 
yet available. According to information 
from the Hunan Public Roads Admini- 
stration, the total kilometrage covered 
during 1933 by 250 cars in Hunan was 
about 2,000. The total operating rev- 
enue for the year was #2,700,000, includ- 
ing #2,241,000 from passenger traffic and 
the remaining #459,000 from freight 
traffic. 

Investigation at the Kiangsi Public 
Roads Bureau reveals that the total kilo- 
metrage covered by 427 cars in Kiangsi 
during 1934 was 2,578. The total opera- 
ting revenue for the year was #2,916,500. 
There was a daily transport of an average 
of 5,700 passengers and 22,000 kilograms 
of freight. The daily receipts from pas- 
senger traffic ran up #7,500 while that 
from freight traffic totalled #1,000. 

Judging by the above figures, it is ob- 
vious that the revenue of highway trans- 
portation in China comes more from pas- 
senger traffic than from freight traffic 
which phenomenon is exactly the opposite 
in railway transportation. 

The Bureau attributes the reason for 
the small amount of freight traffic on 
highways to the high highway freight 
charges, which is about seven times that 
of the railway freight rates. 

There is as yet no unified control of 
highway traffic in the country. Most 
provinces have a public roads bureau 
directly under the provincial department 
of reconstruction, to take charge of high- 
way management. Among these provinces 
are Kiangsu, Chekiang, Shantung, Kiang- 
si, Hunan, Hupeh, Honan. 



CHINA MAIL 

SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Hoover (San Francisco) 
Mar. 1 1 ; President Grant (Seattle) Mar. 
18; President Pierce (San Francisco) 
Mar. 31; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Apr. 1. President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Apr. 8; President Jackson (Se- 
attle) Apr. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Apr. 28; President McKinley 
(Seattle) Apr. 29. 
SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Lincoln 
(San Francisco) Mar. 6; President Hayes 
(San Francisco) Mar. 13. President Mc- 
Kinley (Seattle) Mar. 14; President Hoo- 
ver (San Francisco) Mar. 20; President 
Wilson (San Francisco) Mar. 27; Presi- 
dent Grant (Seattle) Mar. 28. 



Highway management in Shensi and 
Kansu is placed under the control of the 
Northwest Public Roads Administration 
under the N. E. C. In Nanking and 
Greater Shanghai highway administra- 
tion is in charge of the Bureau of Pub- 
lic Works and the Bureau of Public Util- 
ities respectively. 

To co-ordinate the highways in Kiang- 
su, Chekiang, Anhwei, Nanking and 
Greater Shanghai, the N. E. C. has re- 
cently organized a Kiangsu-Chekiang- 
Anhwei - Nanking - Shanghai Highway 
Commission, composed of five members, 
one from each of the provinces and muni- 
cipalities concerned. 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Sir: Enclosed find # for 

period of The Chinese Digest. 

Name 

Address 

City State 



Six Months #1.25; 1 Year #2.00;Foreign $2.75 Year. 



Page 16 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday.March 6, 1936 



Tipping our hat 
to Spring with 

-DUO-BLEND" 




PENN - CRAFT 

(DIVISION OF STETSON) 

LOOKING for something out-of-usual in a Spring Hat? 
Here's one that's smart — but not too much so. It's chain- 
stitched brim holds shape longer. Has Reeded soil-resisting 
leather with blow-off chamois lip. An upstanding quality 
and outstanding value! 



$ 



5 



SPRING STETSONS £6.50 UP 

MOORE'S 

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

840 Market 141 Kearny « 1450 B'way 

Opp. Emporium Near Sutter Oakland 

(^Chinese Salesman here: Edward Leong) 

\ 




COLD AY (Edward Leong) SEZ: 

With the balmy weather now being so 
liberally sprinkled about it's only natural 
that a young man's fancy turns to cool, 
comfortable sportswear and idle hours in 
which to enjoy them. You arrange for 
the hours and have me arrange for the 
sportswear. 

—it— 

The neatest sportswear trick of the 
year is Manhattan's new cotton mesh 
sports shirt in he-man Gaucho style. Cool 
as a cucumber and light as a handker- 
chief. Will save you on laundry bills, too. 
Simply toss it into a soapy tub, whirl it 
around a few times, and hang it up to 
dry. Not bad for a dollar, eh? 

_-•&_ 

I picked this up somewhere and 

thought it worth while repeating here: 

"The well dressed man — is he whose 

clothes look as if they might be new, and 

as if they might be old." 

—■iz— 

Although Moore's worsted slacks are 

packed with elephant-like toughness, 
they're surprisingly trim and comfortable. 
Being hard-woven they hold their press 
like a Scotchman's dollar bill (He keeps 
them forever neatly pressed in his one- 
way wallet. Get it?) They're particularly- 
adapted to school wear, auto driving, 
and other rough-on-clothes activities. 
Fool proof zipper, too. Choice of either 
solid brown or grey at #5.75. 



El 




Sv- 



<3 



a WEEKLY rueucAiiON 



Vol. 2, No. 1 1 



cwwese 




COMMENT - * SOCIAL - ► SPOUTS 
U€WS - * CULTUCli * - LiT£A«VTUfc£ sam «»wcisco.c»iifo(tm» ^ 



March 13, 1936 



Five Cents 




"MEMORIAL TO ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON" 

On the outskirts of Chinatown in Portsmouth Square, 

where the recent Century of Commerce Celebration 

took place, and which is the landmark where the Chinese 

people took refuge during the fire of 1906, stands this 

memorial to the beloved poet. 



"THE HEART 
OF CHINATOWN" 

.—Following the photogra- 
pher's eye along Waverly 
Place running into Wash- 
ington Street, we hit the 
very center of San Francis- 
co's Chinese Community. 

In the background may 
be seen the Oak Tin Asso- 
ciation, comprised of the 
families of Chinn, Woo and 
Yuen. 




Page 2 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



SEATTLE NEWS 

Sports ensembles and white shoes will 
reign supreme when the Waku club holds 
its annual spring informal Thursday, 
March 19 at Chung Wah Hall with Mr. 
Lester Chinn in charge of arrangements. 
Door prizes, good music, and a prize 
waltz will be on the bill. Admission 
will be $1.00 per couple, and remember, 
girls, this is still leap year. 



William Hong, 13-year-old John Mar- 
shall Junior Hi Student, won the Boys' 
Checkers Tournament at Green Lake 
fieldhouse recently, and will compete in 
the all-city finals to be held this week at 
Collins playfield. Meanwhie, Billy is 
keeping in trim by licking everyone a- 
round the neighborhood irrespective of 
age. In addition to his ability over the 
square-board, the youngster is a star for- 
ward on Green Lake's ninety-pound bas- 
ketball squad. His brother, James, is 
captain and guard of the 110-pounders 
at the same playhouse. 



The High School club of the Chinese 
Baptist church conducted a Young pe- 
ople's service at a meeting with the Jap- 
anese Methodist high school people on 
Sunday, March 1. 



Mandarin classes are to be restored to 
the curricula at the University of Wash- 
ington this fall, according to information 
released by the Registrar recently. Ma- 
dame Liang, wife of the vice-Consul, is 
to be instructor. This action will return 
the Chinese language to equality with 
other foreign languages on the campus 
for the first time since 1929 when Man- 
darin was removed because of the lack 
of capable leadership. 

A new basketball team named the Roy- 
al Chinese was recently organized, com- 
posed of girls attending Garfield Hign 
School. Officers elected last week were: 
captain-Fannie Mar, secretary-treasurer- 
Mable Locke, manager-Arlene Mar. These 
girls show signs of a promising, fighting 
team. A skating party was held at the 
Imperial Rink sponsored by this group 
last Wednesday night, March 4, and a 
large crowd participated in roller skating 
to the strains of rhythmic music. 



Radio Station W6MKV 

Despite the fact that he had been 
"on the air" but one short month before 
the beginning of the third annual Canada- 
United States Radio Contact Contest in 
November, Thomas Sue Chow, known as 
radio station W6MVK to all radio ama- 
teurs, and called "Prexy" by the mem- 
bers of the Modesto Junior College Radio 
Club, won first honors for the whole San 
Joaquin Valley Section. 

This section extends from Sacramento 
to Bakersfield and is the largest section 
in California. 

Thomas, who is, incidentally, the only 
Chinese to place in this contest, is presi- 
dent of the Radio club, one of the most 
active clubs on the Modesto Junior col- 
lege campus. He has just finished re- 
building the transmitter of the college 
radio station, W6YB, which will be used 
to send messages from the campus to 
cities all over the United States. 

A special certificate of merit signed in 
full by the committee which sponsored 
the contest as well as the Canadian mana- 
ger has been awarded to Chow for his 
efforts. 



Mar; Mrs. Hing Chinn; and Mrs. Eugene 
Luke . . . Louise Louie reading on a 
street car . . . Esther Chinn, rough and 
tough center for the Chinese girls, is the 
ball-hawk of the squad . . . Four members 
of the Young China squad wear masks 
to protect their glasses, consequently the 
team is called the "Masked Marvels" . . . 
Practically all the Leo's are down with 
the flu . . . Priscilla Hwang and Helen 
Hong taking dates out on a private Tolo, 
doing all the driving et al . . . Howard 
Fung, S. F. China Dry Goods representa- 
tive, passing through town . . . Bill Lum, 
again at the U this year and with the 
Missus, also a Californian . . . Tis said 
of Jack Wong that he'd rather dance 
than eat, he's all set again for the Waku 
prize waltz which he won last year . . . 
Dorothy Nellie Tang referring to people 
as "hot toddies" . . . Butch Luke pointing 
out the fine points of his new coupe . . . 
the Chinese Students squau training ser- 
iously for their coming California jaunt 
. . . James Malcolm Mar's injured ankle 
almost healed, and the return of the 
speedy forward will bolster China Club 
casaba strength considerably. 



Chitter-Chatter 

Seen at the Waku-China Club tussle 
rooting for friend husband were: Mrs. 
Yuin Chinn, the former Ruth Hing of 
Portland; Mrs. Clarence Conrad Mar, nee 
Mildred Chinn of Portland; Mrs. Frank 

Patronize Our Advertisers — They Help to Make This a Bigger and Better Paper 



Hip Wo Receives 
Community's Response 

Hip Wo, Chinatown's largest evening 
language school, received the generous 
support of the community in the school's 
recent campaign to raise funds for needed 
improvements in school facilities and 
equipment. According to Rev. Leong 
Bing Yee, principal of the school, the 
outcome of the sale of tickets has been 
very gratifying. 

The benefit entertainment held Satur- 
day evening, March 7, at the Chinese Y. 
M. C. A. consisted of musical numbers, 
dances, dramatic performances, all pre- 
sented entirely by the students of the 
school. The main attraction, a seven-act 
play "Heroic Lovers", written and direct- 
ed by Rev. Tse Kei Yuen, portrayed the 
defensive valor of the 19th Route Army 
in the Shanghai Crisis of January, 1932. 
Patriotic in theme, the play had touches 
of romance, religion, and Chinese ethics. 

The evening's program would not have 
been possible without the loyal partici- 
pation of the students, and the able as- 
sistance of the various teachers, chief 
among whom were David Yip, David 
Leong, and Kei Tien Wong. Generous 
contributions were received from Joe 
Shoong, who donated $100; Tao Yuen 
Restaurant, San Francisco, $50, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Knox, $40. 

• • 
PRESIDENT OF YENCHING 
UNIVERSITY GUEST OF HONOR 

On March 18:h, Wednesday, Dr. 
Leighton Stuart, President of Yenching 
University, Peiping, China, will be the 
guest of honor at a tea at International 
House, Berkeley. Numerous U. C. Fa- 
culty members and prominent members 
of the San Francisco Chinese community, 
including Consul-General and Mrs. C. C. 
Huang have been invited to meet Dr. 
Stuart. 

The Chinese members of International 
House will act as hosts and hostesses for 
the evening. 

• • 

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Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Pag* 3 



CHINATOWN. IA 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 

The L. A. J. C. Cathay Cultural Club 
had their initiation party for the new 
students last Friday evening at the Inter- 
national Institute. Bill Got was in charge 
of the initiation, and life was made mis- 
erable for the poor freshman students. 

On the evening's entertainment were 
stunts presented by the different classes 
of the college. The Alpha class won the 
first prize for the best stunt while Miss 
Dorothy Lung's Beta class was given the 
boobie prize. 

Dancing concluded the evening's pro- 
gram. Among the Alpha's initiatees were 
Misses June Wong, Lillie Jang, and Bar- 
bara Quon, and Mr. Stephen Tom and 
Mr. Albert Lew. 

The biggest event of the year will take 
place on March 27 starting at 8 p. m. 
Judging from the elaborate plans and 
untiring efforts of the committees to make 
this a gala affair, the Collegiate Prom 
should be well attended and all the guests 
will be singing praises to the committee- 
men. 

The dance will be open to all students 
and their friends. The place is the Mon- 
tebello Women's Club at Montebello. 

An unusual series of lectures on China, 
which will include history, culture and 
art will be presented every Thursday af- 
ternoon of March at Bullock's, one of 
the largest department stores in Los An- 
geles. 

In addition to the lecture series is an 
exhibit of rare Chinese art objects. The 
lectures and exhibit have been arranged 
by Bullock's and are sponsored by the 
China Society of Southern California. 

The first lecture on March 5 was given 
by Dr. Wm. F. Hummel, on The Pageant 
of Chinese Civilization; and on March 
12 The Chinese Concept of Life was giv- 
en by Dr. Ralph Tyler Flewelling. On 
March 17, will be Dr. Hummel on 
China's Literary Heritage. March 20, 
Mary Ferris Swan on Seeing China With 
an Artist; on March 24, Chingwah Lee 
on Chinese Porcelains and Jade; and 
March 27, Dr. Hans Von Koerber on 
The Philosophy of Chinese Bronze. 

The Chinese Tri-Y will join the Los 
Angeles Girl Reserves in their City-Wide 
High School Roller Skating Party at the 
Rollerdrome Skating Rink at 11150 
Washington Place on March 14, from 
2:00-4:30 p. m. Tickets are 25 cents. 

Al proceeds from this party will go 
toward the Asilomar Benefit Fund to 
send delegates to the Girl Reserves An- 



SPORT DANCE 

A sport dance is being sponsored by 
the Chinese Y. M. C. A. for March 21, 
at the Chinese Y. W. C. A., 965 Clay 
Street. Music will be furnished by the 
Cathayans Orchestra. 

Proceeds of the dance will go toward 
a benefit fund for the Boys Camp this 
year. 

• • 

nual Summer Conference held at Mon- 
terey, California. At this conference are 
girls from all over California, Nevada, 
and the Hawaiian Islands. 



KINDNESS RETURNED 

Years ago, when he was a brilliant 
but poor boy, Hsien-an Yuan was pro- 
vided $30 a year for six years for his 
advanced education by members of the 
Railton Road Methodist Church in Heme 
Hill, England. Yuan, who has changed 
his name to Railton Yuan and at pre- 
sent a prosperous business man in Shang- 
hai, recently sent a donation to the 
church in reciprocation of their assistance 
in his youth. 



FEATURING 

NEW SPRING STYLES 

AND FASH IONS IN 

SUITS 

$19.75 to $29.75 

" We Invite Your Inspection 



A FULL STOCK OF ACCESSORIES— 

Arrow Shirts $ 1 .95 

Grayco Ties $ 1 .00 

Cooper's Socks, 3 pairs $1.00 

Also a large variety in other brands at low prices. 
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Page 4 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



OAKLAND NEWS 

To commemorate their seventh anni- 
versary, members of the Waku Auxiliary 
convened last Wednesday evening at Pe- 
kin Low for an informal celebration. 
Practically every active member attended 
the dinner and tentative plans for the 
remainder of the year were brought up 
for discussion. 

For years the highest scoring basket- 
ball team in the bay region, the girls set 
up an enviable record. Then marriage 
took its toll. 

Of late, interest in athletics revived 
and, with a few veterans as a nucleus, 
Waku Auxiliary is building anew with 
material from the Junior members. 



Last week Wa Sung went through a 
gruelng practice in preparation for the 
Regulars-Yannigans baseball game this 
Sunday at San Pablo Park. Prospects of 
a ball game with a strong San Joaquin 
valley nine in Fresno during the latter 
part of May enlivened the session. 

Clicking with precision and teamwork, 
the infield looms as the club's most pow- 
erful in years. Al Bowen and Ben Chan, 
a valuable duo, will alternate at first and 
pitching. George Bowen and Key Chinn 
form the present keystone combination. 
Both are hard hitters and strong fielders; 
slugging Frank Dun will guard the tor- 
rid corner. 

Since Allie Wong is finishing his third 
year with the Tech High varsity and Joe 
Lee is out with an infected hand, the 
center and right field patches are the weak 
links. Robert Chow, Eli Eng and Al 
Hing are competing for the right field 
position. Tom Hing, who won a terpsi- 
chorean prize, showed up in the outfield 
nursing a torn ligament in his right arm. 



Due to circumstances beyond our con- 
trol, the Chinese Students Club will hold 
the skating party on Thursday, March 
19 instead of on Tuesday as announced. 
The evening promises to be another suc- 
cess from the Club's viewpoint and, to 
the inexperienced skater, a big flop. 



Canadian House Rejects 
Expulsion Motion 

A motion by Angus Maclnnis, mem- 
ber from Vancouver, to exclude Chinese, 
Japanese and Hindu immigrants was re- 
jected by the Canadian House of Com- 
mons, by a vote of 186 to 15, last week. 
Maclnnis declined to withdraw his ex- 
pulsion motion after Prime Minister Mac- 
Kenzie King made such a request in view 
of the present situation in the Far East. 

The motion by Maclnnis would exclude 
all Orientals who did not receive full 
citizenship rights. In the final vote li- 
berals and conservatives united against 
the motion with the social credit group 
split. 

Prime Minister King commented 
that this was not the time to create prob- 
lems which would embarass Canada and 
other countries, adding that in view of 
events in Japan it would be unfortunate 
for Canada and the world if the parlia- 
ment at Ottawa were forced to vote on 
Oriental exclusion. 

• • 

AN INSURANCE MISPRINT 

A misprint in a Chinese language pa- 
per recently caused a furore among 'he 
Chinese, in reference to insurance. 

An American paper had published a 
news item, stating that the Chinese were 
heavy insurance buyers. The Chinese 
paper, either during the course of trans- 
lation or in the composing room, wrot^, 
"and any Chinese leaving the United 
States automatically cancels any claims 
the policyholder may make on the insur- 
ance company." 

It was recently pointed out that such 
is NOT the case. Automatic suspension 
of a policy does take effect only on ac- 
cidental and suicidal death. 



Illllllllllllillh ';'!, ! ' ' 'I ' ".■ '. " - 



CHAS. P. LOW CO. 

General Insurance Counselors 
Real Estate Brokers 

Licensed - Bonded 



The Oakland Chinese Center club 
house at 832 Webster St. has been com- 
fortably furnished and is ready for trie 
influx of members. The executive board 
met there last Tuesday evening to formu- 
late plans for an open house night, the 
details of which will be announced later. 
The club-room, conveniently located near 
Chinatown, will prove to be a popular 
hang-out for bridge players and bull se- 
isions. 

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Member 

INSURANCE BROKERS' 
EXCHANGE 

of San Francisco 

— •— 

KEarny 4563 - - CHina 1601 

756 Sacramento St. 

San Francisco. California 



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Chinese Heavy 
Insurance Buyers 

A local insurance broker, writing in 
an insurance publication, declared that 
San Francisco's Chinatown is one of the 
most completely insured areas in the Uni- 
ted States, buying multiple kinds of in- 
surance protection. 

"The Chinese believe in insurance, as 
history relates that they are one of the 
originators of insurance thousands of 
years ago," the broker stated. "Trans- 
planted to the United States, the Chinese, 
with characteristic business caution, still 
insure." 

The broker continued, "In the matter 
of claims, there are no fairer or more 
honest people than the Chinese. A 
fraudulent claim among them is rare, 
indeed." 



▼ T ▼ ▼ ▼ 



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ing plant — the largest and finest, 
possessing all facilities necessary to 
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perfectly, assuring you the best of 
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We don't carelessly finish your 
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Seven different specialized ex- 
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Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Nga 5 



TEA AN D LANTERNS 



CLARA CHAN 



SOCIAL GO-ROUNDS 

Saturday's social whirl has become a 
proverbial hurricane and unless our gen- 
ial hosts and hostesses let up a bit we'll 
be spending the week days in a daze. 
With four worthwhile events going on 
Saturday, your correspondent, moon- 
struck and always after the different, 
sauntered to Kern Loo's Menlo Park home 
for an evening of good old-fashioned 
fun. Weenie roasting had become quite 
passe until our charming host entertained. 
We found special delight under the pale 
moon and the spell of the open fire. Bar- 
becue was prepared by Kern and what 
entertainment by harmonizers — Dr. and 
Mrs. Balfour Chinn, Mr. and Mrs. Yee 
Wong. Mrs. Charles Chan, Miss Marjorie 
Koe, and Messrs. Edward Leong, Edward 
Chan, and Robert Poon. 



Another One on the Ladies Lien Fa Saw You 



Depend upon the "965" girls to up- 
hold and glorify the Chinese girl. They 
captured the hearts of the large gathering 
at the Central Y. W. C. A. circus with 
their dragon dance in native costume. 
Nothing was left undone to perfect their 
presentation; Chinese music and atmos- 
phere were furnished by other members 
of the club. In case you don't know, 
boys, the "965" holds its meetings at the 
Chinese Y. W. and Mrs. Bernice Foley 
is always ready to furnish information. 



' At home" parties never seem to end 
and the fathers of the community should 
declare a curfew if youth is to remain 
vivacious for church on Sundays. Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Lem, nee Miss Mary 
Young, received friends in their new 
home. As late comers as we were, we 
found the party hitting it up and having 
a rollicking good time. We understand 
that after the party, some of the young 
couples went window shopping (and 
breakfasted) — one in particular — wanted 
to buy a piano to play "It's Three O'- 
clock in the Morning." 



Since we're "Winchelling-it' or should 
we say "poo-pooing" it, we might as well 
tell you to prepare for the party that 
will soon celebrate the first anniversary 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry K. Wong (nee 
Gertrude Lee) of Sacramento. The first 
year's the hardest but you can't prove 
by Harry and Gertie. 



Your correspondent can get serious 
when the occasion arises. Tuesday after- 
noon found Mr. T. Y. Tang, Executive 
Secretary of the Y. M. C A., and a group 
of Chinese discussing racial problems 



The prominent and eligible bachelors 
of Los Angeles were "taken" by the girls 
to a brilliant Leap Year Dinner-Dance 
last Tuesday night, March 3, at the Bilt- 
more Bowl in the Biltmore Hotel. The 
men had the most enjoyable time of their 
lives as they did not have to shell out a 
single penny — the young ladies footing 
all the bills, including "corsages" (bach- 
elor buttons) for the fortunate men. Miss 
Lillian Yee was the charming "official" 
hostess. 

Those who attended were: Miss Ruth 
Kim and Dr. Mack Sue; Miss Holly Le- 
ung and Dr. A. Edward Lee; Miss Mae 
Lou and Dr. William Lee. Miss Rose Lee 
and Mr. Ralph Wong; Miss Edna Lee 
and Mr. John Chan; Miss Sadie Sam 
and Mr. Abraham Yap; Miss Lillian Woo 
and Mr. Albert Hing; Miss Ann Gow 
and Mr. Buck Young; Miss Jane Chan 
and Mr. Walter Chung; Miss Ling Chan 
and Mr. Jack Chew; Miss Florence Ong 
and Mr. Howard Leung; and Miss Lillian 
Yee and Mr. Cyrus Chan. 
• • 

with other members of the Central Y. 
M. C. A. These forums will be regular 
semi-monthly events, and ways and means 
of breaking down social barriers between 
the minority groups will be discussed. 



We couldn't quite get past the sergeant- 
at-arms, but the Wah Ying Clubbers were 
holding their regular meeting on Tues- 
day, the 11th. You notice that Jackson 
St. is rather deserted because big plans 
are being formulated by this club. We 
hope they sponsor another athletic event. 

Three days of rest and then the big 
splurge given by the Chitena Club. Yes, 
an invitational dance at the California 
Club on Clay Street. Unless we're wrong, 
the Chinatown Knights are furnishing 
the music. Tipsy punch is being prepared 
by the social chairman. The lovely Viola 
Eyden will be the feature artist assisted 
at the piano by her equally charming 
sister, Adeline. 



HOWARD 


MACEE 


COUNSBLLOR-AT-LAW 

• 

BXbrook 0298 San FitndMO 

Anglo Bank Bide. - 830 Maikat St 



Suits are here to stay! Single or double 
breasted. Very tailored to be softened 
with a feminine frilly blouse or strictly 
mannish with a silk or starched shirt, so 
suit yourselves, girls. 

A black single breasted model was Miss 
Jennie Wong's choice, serviceable quali- 
ty, tailored to perfection, she wears under 
her jacket a white silk shirt. Another 
white dash was in her button hole, an at- 
tractive artificial carnation. This vivid 
contrast of color is always favored by 
smart women. Slim and trim this fault- 
less suit looked remarkably jaunty on the 
Oakland miss. 

In the greenest green and the blackest 
black Miss Janie Koe wears fittingly a 
three-piece suit of black sheer ribbed 
wool, set off with a green satin blouse 
with a high neckline of blocked pleats. 
Tiny bound buttons were placed along 
the pleats, her jacket along the shoulder 
was emphasized with small tucks, the bot- 
tom of the jacket has a set-in pleat on 
either side in the back. Black suede ac- 
cessories, a combination of crispy straw 
and suede-like fabric of the turban make 
this outfit a hit. 

Miss Evelyn Wing dons a navy blue 
suit that deserves an applause, particu- 
larly when her satin vestee of white is 
worn, like a blousette with a row of the 
"wee-ist" sparkling buttons in the front 
— exceedingly cute under the expertly 
tailored suit. With this, Evelyn has a 
jaunty blue grosgrain stitched hat with 
a perky bunch of blossoms nestled on the 
extreme right of the shallow crown. 
Checking with this chapeau is an envel- 
ope kid bag of navy also neatly stitched. 
Kid pumps triumphantly complete this 
navy version. 

• • 

ST. MARY'S A. C. TO ENTERTAIN* 

An evening of dramatic and musical 
entertainment will be given by the St. 
Mary's Athletic Club on Saturday, Mar. 
14, at 8 o'clock. The talented members 
of this organization and of the St. Mary's 
Footlight Club will take part in the enter- 
tainments. 

This athletic club, organized 3 months 
ago, and with a present membership of 
over a hundred, is sponsoring the com- 
ing program to raise sufficient funds 
with which to equip a gymnasium in the 
auditorium of the Chinese Catholic So- 
cial Center. This will require some #450, 
and the club is endeavoring to raise this 
sum. 



Page 6 



CHINESE DIGEST 



HERE'S A NEW 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



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TEA AND LANTERNS 



POO-POO 

By Bob Poon 



More guts than brains. That could 
be applied to the couple who indulged 
in a little fisticuffs at the Chinese Youth 
Spring Dance. They should have known 
better than to start immediately after the 
chairman introduced the CHIEF OF PO- 
LICE of Oakland. I guess they wanted 
the HONOR of being arrested by the 
Chief. 



After the Dance in Oakland, a seven 
passenger car started out for the ferry. 
Upon following the car one could notice 
the peculiar way it was starting for the 
ferry. It seemed to head in one direc- 
tion, change its mind and go another, 
like an insect trying to find its way out of 
a trap. The mystery was solved when 
it became known the driver was taking 
orders from another driver — a BACK- 
SEATER! 



I have made a lengthy study of the 
winners of door prizes. I guess I'll pre- 
sent it to you as a theorem. To prove: 
Winners of door prizes are those who 
have no use for it, or have one already. 
Given, the Square and Circle Hope Chest 
Raffle, the Chinese Youth Spring Dance 
.... The Hope Chest was won by a man 
this year. He had no use for it (his 
wife being in China). The Easy washer 
at the C Y dance was won by Eugene 
Dong of Salinas; he had one already. 
Therefore, the winners of door prizes 
are those that have no use for it, or have 
one already. Q. E. D. 



Salinas, heretofore practically unknown 
in these parts, have been visited by quite 
a number of San Francisco boys. I 
wonder what the attraction is there, or 
what Salinas has that S. F. hasn't. Maybe 
I'll go there and find out for myself, it 
sounds mighty interesting. 
• • 

CHUN- WOO ENGAGEMENT 
IN FRESNO 

Congratulations are in order for 
James T. Chun and Katherine Woo of 
Fresno, whose engagement was announced 
last week. Miss Woo is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Woo, owners of the 
Dragon Cafe, and a graduate of the 
Roosevelt High Schorl. The wedding 
date is not as yet announced, although 
it will take place in the near future. 



YOUTH CIRCLE SPRING DANCE 

The Chinese Youth Circle of Oakland 
gave its "Annual Spring Frolic and 
Dance" at the Persian Garden last Sat- 
urday evening which was the mecca for 
distinguished guests from various parts 
of the state. 

According to Edwin Gee, Chairman 
of the affair, approximately 800 persons 
were present, one of the largest gatherings 
ever to attend an Oakland Chinese func- 
tion. Guests for the evening included 
Mayor McCracken of Oakland, Lt. and 
Mrs. Barbeau, Dr. and Mrs. Harold Tow- 
er, Miss Rita Monte, Dr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond L. Ng, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Gilbert 
and Mr. and Mrs Joseph Mayer 

The floor show was under the direction 
of Mrs J. W. Chan while Dr. Ng acted 
in the capacity of master of ceremony. 
Featured artists were a pair of versatile 
colored tap dancers, the Vernon Bro- 
thers from the Hollywood M-G-M Stu- 
dios. Shirley May Ng, the petite Chinese 
songbird sang, pleadingly, "Please Be- 
lieve Me." Eugene Lee, a vigorous bari- 
tone, offered "Where Am I?". Unpre- 
pared for the ensuing thunderous ap- 
plause, he rendered again as an encore, 
"Where Am I?". Little Mary Dong con- 
cluded the entertainment with a piano 
recital. 

Prize waltz winners of a silver loving 
cup in the free-for-all competition were 
Albert Lee and Jeanne Lew. In the other 
contest for club entries, Tom Hing of 
Wa Sung A. C. and Beatrice Lee of 
Square and Circle stepped away from a 
classy field. Jon Forsee and a ten piece 
orchestra provided the music for the eve- 
ning. 

Fortunate prize winners of the Raffle 
were: Gene Dong of Salinas, a Thor 
Washing Machine; Chan Chow of Oak- 
land, a suit of clothes. Lim Kee of Oak- 
land, a set of 54 piece glassware; Ken 
Ying Low of San Jose, a case of ginger 
ale; and Elmer Lee of San Francisco, a 
theater scrip-book. 

• • 

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED 

The engagement of Frank Lee of Fres- 
no and Rose Jing was announced recently. 
Lee is the amiable manager of the Fresno 
branch of the National Dollar Store, 
while the prospective bride is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Y. Jing. She is a 
graduate of the Fresno High School and 
also attended the Fresno State Teachers 
College, besides being a popular member 
of the Lok Quan Girls Club. 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Paga 7 



CHINATOWNIA 



The Towntrotter Says: 

'Tis reported that Mr. and Mrs. 
THOMAS LEONG expect a blessed 
event very shortly, hoping for twins or 
triplets? .... DAISY DONG, a member 
of the Los Angeles Young People's 
Group, is training at the General Hos- 
pital, dear nursie .... HELEN and 
CLEO CHOW and JOE JEIN are known 
in L. A. as the Three Musketeers .... 
AL CHINN of Bakersfield and FRANK 
YEE of Perris were recent visitors to the 
southern city, as were Mrs LAWRENCE 
JOE of Hanford and TOMMY CHOW, 
station W6MVK of Modesto and his 
uncle, N. S. SUE — must be the sunny 
climate .... BEATRICE E. MOORE, 
niece of HENRY SEID, sings and tap 
dances over the radio every week in 

Brooklyn, N. Y ELMER LEW and 

FLOYD SAM are the ranking no. 1 and 
no. 2 big eaters of Fresno, challenging 
all comers to compete .... Have you 
heard that Fresno's new school building 
which will be in use in April, will also 
be used as the Chinese Social Center 
there? .... And nowadays, we wonder 
why the deep contemplative look on the 
face of ED MOCK — what, another fling? 
.... GEORGE ONG won a #10.00 bil- 
liard cue in the city-wide tournament 
last week .... Mr. and Mrs. FRANK 
HEE and MRS. MYRON CHAN were 
seen a week ago today at the Civic Audi- 
torium, witnessing the P. A. A. basket- 
ball games .... Hearsay that DOLORES 
MAY FONG of Sacramento is engaged. 
To whom? We only know that he's a 
nice young man from out-of-town, same 
report having it that she may take a trip 
to China soon .... Press dispatches have 
it that DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS and his 
bride plan a wedding trip to China, where 
he may make a picture on the adventures 
of Marco Polo .... Do you know that 
the popular JADIN WONG is back at 
the New Shanghai Cafe? Go up and see 
her sometime, you'll like her singing and 
dancing .... CARL and GEORGE LEE 
of Sacramento are in town for a short 
visit .... You'll be seeing BILLY WON 
on the screen soon, he's in the movies 
now down in Hollywood .... Mr. and 
Mrs. DILLIE AH TYE, JR. of Stockton 
visited San Francisco last week-end. AH 
TYE, JR. is manager of the only Shell 
service station in Stockton catering to 
Chinese trade .... So, until nextweek! 

Patronize Our 



SACRAMENTO NEWS General Fang in Berkeley 



And a Chinese lady steps forth from 
among her lily bulbs and peonies to gain 
honors at a camellia show. 

Mrs. G. S. Dong of 717-13th Street, 
Sacramento, won first and second prizes 
in the Annual Camellia Show held re- 
cently in the Garden Center of McKinley 
Park. Congratulations, Mrs. Dong! 

The show was sponsored by the Sacra- 
mento Garden Club. 



At an election of the Cheng Sen Club, 
a girls' organization under the Y. W. 
C. A., the following officers were eleoted: 

President, Jane Fong; vice-president, 
Alice K. Fong; secretary, Marjorie Chan; 
treasurer, Ruby Yee. 

The club held a special meeting on 
Mar. 6 at the home of Mrs. Howard 
Jan. Plans for a raffle and a program 
were discussed for the forthcoming an- 
nual spring formal. 

Several new members have joined the 
club recently. 

The Sacramento Chinese Choral Club, 
under the directorship of Mrs. Emma 
Dunstan, sang at the Y. M. C. A. Inter- 
national Frolic, which was sponsored by 
the Sacramento Church Federation. 



Four of the co-eds at the local J. C. 
were invited to join the Phi Theta Kappa 
national junior college scholastic frat- 
ernity. The eligible ones are Helen 
Chan, Marjorie Chan, Janet Chock and 
Ruby Fong. Ruby Fong, who graduates 
in June, is a permanent member of the 
honor society. 



A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Clarence Fong on Feb. 23. 



See Me Before You Buy 

ARTHUR N. DICK 

REPRESENTING 

Plymouth Chrysler 

• 

Bigger Trade-in Allowance 

Low Finance Rate 

Phones: CH 1824 or PRos. 2400 

james w. McAllister, inc. 

Van Ness at Post San Francisco 



The Far Eastern Relations Committee 
gave a reception to General Fang Chen- 
wu at the Y. W. C. A. cottage, Berkeley, 
on Friday, March 6, with Yung Su-Ming 
presiding. General Fang's topic was: 
"Fight for World Peace." About one 
hundred University of California stu- 
dents including Chinese, Americans and 
Japanese were present. 

General Fang has been invited by Mr. 
Allen C. Blaisdell, director of the Inter- 
national House, Berkeley, to be the house 
guest of International House on Mon- 
day, Tuesday, and Wednesday — 9th, 10th, 
and 11th of March. The Chinese Stu- 
dents of U. C. have been invited to at- 
tend the various occasions planned for 
General Fang, so that they may have 
an opportunity to meet him. There will be 
tray dinners, discussion groups, and teas 
during General Fang's stay at Interna- 
tional House. 



AS WE A-SHOPPING GO 

China put a Celestial touch on the new 
Spring mode in Paris. Chinese lacquer 
red appears in trimmings, with Chinese 
motifs marking belt buckles, while Chi- 
nese figures are stamped on prints. 

Many afternoon frocks are designed 
along simple and highnecked lines, sug- 
gestive of Oriental suavity. Dinner frocks 
in black are topped off by knee-length 
coats of flower-printed black cire silk, 
the cut showing Chinese inspiration. 

Dare we suggest that we might be wear- 
ing Chinese coiffures before long? 



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Page 8 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



EDITORIAL 



THB CHINESE DIGBST 

Published weekly at 868 Washington Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone CHina 2400 

THOMAS W. CHINN, Editor 

Per year, £2.00; Per copy, 5c 
Foreign, ?2.75 per year 
Not responsible for contributions 
unaccompanied by return postage 

STAFF 



CHING WAH LEE 

WILLIAM HOY 

FRED GEORGE WOO 

CLARA CHAN 

ETHEL LUM 



..Associate Editor 
-Associate Editor 

Sports 

Fashions 



ROBERT G. POON 



-Community Welfare 
Circulation 



CORRESPONDENTS 


AND REPRESENTATIVES 


Los Angeles _ 


-„ William Cot, Elsie Lee 


Oakland 


Hector Eng, Ernest Loo 


Portland..- _ 


Eva Moe, Edgar Lee 


Seattle 


.Eugene Wong, Edwin Luke 


Salinas 




Bakersfield 




Watsonville 


Iris Wong 


Fresno _ 


Allen Lew 





A CHINESE DESIGN 

Chinatown should be proud of the fact that a group 
of prominent organizations and citizens are interested 
in Chinatown. 

The most recent activity concerns the buildings in 
this community, and how WE may capitalize on our 
cultural background in turning this vicinity into a typi- 
cal Chinese city. 

Picturesque, it will attract world-wide attention. 

Financially, it will mean more dollars for this locality. 

The following extractions from a letter addressed to 
Mr. William G. Merchant, Chairman of the Chinatown 
Committee of the Downtown Association, and, inci- 
dentally, the Association that was responsible for our 
beautiful lamps in Chinatown — from Mr. J. W. Pettit, 
Assistant General Manager of the Yellow Cab Company, 
reads: 

"I would suggest that, at the first opportunity, you 
go and see the store front of Hip Hing Co., 737 Wash- 
ington Street, Importers and Exporters, which is next 
door to the Chinese Exchange, and there you will find 
your idea of Oriental architecture that should be car- 
ried out in every store front of Chinatown. 

"In speaking to Messrs. Hoy and Lochen, proprietors, 
as to how they came to carry out their Oriental design, 
when the modern tile fronts seem to be the vogue in 
Chinatown, they said that they wanted their front to 
harmonize with that of the Chinese Exchange, and that 



LET US ABOLISH THE LAST OF THE "PODII"! 

The recent "podii" articles in one of the San Fran- 
cisco dailies illustrate how sadly behind times the Chi- 
nese community is. 

While the "podii" had its place among the Chinese 
decades ago, (reasons set forth in Feb. 21st issue of the 
Chinese Digest) , just as American citizens have leases 
and contracts, and while it is not an extortion plan or 
racket as claimed, there is no reason why it should exist 
today. 

With practically every Chinese in America an Ameri- 
can citizen today, which gives them the right to pur- 
chase or lease real estate, thus wiping out one of the 
reasons for the existence of the "podii", there should 
not be such practices! The very few that we do have 
should be abolished! 

Is it always necessary for people outside of our com- 
munity to come in and make us "sit up straight and act 
nice, or papa spank?" 

their store front cost them three to four hundred dol- 
lars less than if they had built it along the lines of the 
other fronts, which is certainly a strong argument in 
favor of the Oriental designs. Their front, which I as- 
sume, takes in the painting of the two upper stories, 
with sign work, is certainly one of the most attractive 
fronts in Chinatown. 

"Chinatown can make itself the second greatest at- 
traction to the visitor of our coming World's Fair, if 
they have a mind to ... . we are placed in the position 
to know that a great percentage of the tourists who 
visit Chinatown become disappointed in its modern as- 
pect. 

"I am wondering if there could not be some sort of 
an Ordinance enacted, which would govern the type of 
architecture, such as I understand Santa Barbara has 
enacted, to create the Spanish architecture there of their 
buildings on the main street, which would govern the 
type of buildings in our Chinatown." 

And that is only one of the buildings which have 
recently remodeled. We notice that the Shanghai Ba- 
zaar, located at 645 Grant Avenue, is also to be Orient- 
al in appearance. Probably the Chinese have finally 
awakened to the fact that maybe, after all, a Chinese 
front looks best and is just so much more an asset to 
the store and its business. 

It is good to know that other people are interested 
in the proper and appropriate improvements in our 
community. It would be unanimous now if we could 
only get most of the owners of Chinatown property to 
see it in that light also. 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Pag* 9 



CULTURE 



CHINGWAH LBB 



Chinese Inventions and 
Discoveries 

China Had A Board of Public Health, 
3,000 Years Ago. 

During the Chou Dynasty, the medical 
department of the country was a highly 
organized institution. As recorded in the 
Chou Li (Rituals of the Chou Dynasty), 
the Medical Board had a Superintendent's 
Office consisting of two Grade A physi- 
cians, four Grade C doctors or appren- 
tices, two registrars, two clerks, and 
twenty nurses and orderlies. 

The chief doctor of the Office super- 
intended all matters relating to medi- 
cine and collected drugs for experiment- 
ation. He directs the doctors who take 
charge of the different departments so 
that those who are sick or wounded may 
go to see them. At the end of the year 
their work is examined, and their salaries 
fixed according to the results shown. 
When any death occurs, the doctor in 
charge has to record the cause of death 
and submit the report to the head office. 
Under this Office were four departments. 

The Medical Department had eight 
Grade B physicians who attend to the 



THE FOLLOWING STORES 

CARRY THE 

CHINESE DIGEST: 

• 

CHINA MERCANTILE CO. 

543 Grant Avenue 

Silk Coods, Souvenirs 



CRESCENT PHARMACY 

Drugs and Cosmetics 

Fountain Service 

1101 Powell Street 



FAT MING CO. 

905 Grant Avenue 

Books and Stationery 



PAUL ELDER & CO. 

Books and Stationery 

239 Post Street 



SERVICE SUPPLY CO. 

Chinese and English Books 

831 Grant Avenue 



UNIQUE MAGAZINE SHOP 

Magazine and Papers 

681 Jackson Street 



BOWEN SALES CO. 

Fountain Service 

800 Webster Street 

Oakland, Calif. 

• 



sickness of the people. They treated in- 
ternal diseases only. They recognized 
the seasonal occurances of various dis- 
eases and prepared themselves according- 

ly- 

The Department of Dietetics was con- 
sidered the most important of the four 
departments, being of a preventive na- 
ture. "The skillful doctor treats those 
who are well, but the inferior doctor 
treats those who are ill." (Difficult Clas- 
sics.) The Department had two Grade B 
doctors who mix the "six foods and 
drinks, the six meals, the hundred sauces, 
and the eight delicacies" for the invalids. 

The dietitians of the time advocated 
temperance in eating and drinking. 
Strong flavours, strong wine, and rich 
food were considered harmful. "Meat 
and wine brought from the street stands 
should not be taken." Sleep and diet 
were prescribed even before the admini- 
stration of drugs. 

The Department of Veterinary Medi- 
cine had four Grade C doctors who treat- 
ed and recorded the ailments and wounds 
of horses, sheep, pigs, and other dom- 
estic animals. 

Great precautions were taken agaianst 
"quack doctors", especially witch doctors 
who were looked upon with grave suspi- 
cion and were considered as idlers too 
lazy to persevere and study. Doctors were 
graded on the success they have with 
their cases, and preference given those 
who had had at least three generations 
of experience in the family behind them. 
• • 

LARGEST LAUNDRY IN AMERICA 

Located in San Francisco is the largest 
Chinese and American operated laundry 
in America, the Economy Laundry, which 
specializes in hotel, inn, and hand laun- 
dry office work. Frank Rusalem is presi- 
dent, with Albert Jue Lew as the Chinese 
manager. 

This laundry concern, which operates 
all over the city, has a capacity of $12,- 
000 a week, handling more than sixty 
hotels and hand laundry offices. It em- 
ploys a total of 73 men and women, and 
has eight delivery wagons. 



ECONOMY LAUNDRY 

2450 Harrison St. (Plant) 

— •— 

1-Day Service - Reasonable Prices 
Chinatown Office, 867 Washington 

VAlencia 0110 CHina 0333 
San Francisco, California 



China Society of So. Cal. 
Installs Officers 

Installation of the new officers of the 
China Society of Southern California 
took place last week with a dinner at the 
Tuey Fong Low Cafe. 

New officers and board members for 
1936 are Vice-Consul Yi-seng Kiang, 
honorary-president; Dr. William F. 
Hummel, president. Peter Soo Hoo, vice- 
president; Samuel Schwartzberg, secre- 
tary; I. L. Chow, treasurer; Mrs. Peter 
Soo Hoo, financial secretary; and board 
members: Dr. William Y. Lee, Dr. Hans 
N. Von Koerber, Clarence H. Mation, 
Mrs. Bessie Ochs, and Mrs. Alfred H. 
Swan. 

The program consisted of an illustrated 
talk on porcelains by Ching Wah Lee, 
associate editor of the Chinese Digest; 
a Chinese song sung by Mrs. Eugene Tin- 
cher of Long Beach; and a Chinese com- 
edy presented by Lim P. Lee, president 
of the Chinese Students Association of 
Southern California. 

Notable guests present at the dinner 
were Vice-Consul and Mrs. Yi-Seng Ki- 
ang; Dr. Wm. B. Pettus, president of 
College of Chinese Studies at Peiping 
and Mrs. Pettus; Mr. Rosecrans, vice- 
president of Los Angeles Chamber of 
Commerce and Mrs. Rosecrans; Mr. E. 
T. Carran, executive secretary of the So- 
ciety in Oriental Studies at Claremont 
College; Mr. G. A. Glasscock, chairman 
of Foreign Trade D epartment, of L. A. 
Chamber of Commerce; Dr. Randall 
Phillips, pastor of Hollywood M. E. 
Church; and Dr. and Mrs. D. Willard 
Lyon who have spent 35 years in China 
doing Y. M. C. A. work. 



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Limousines for all occasions 




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Page 10 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



REVIEWS AND COMMENT 



"BEAUTY IN CHINA" 

"Beauty In China," an article by Pearl 
S. Buck, is one of the most delightful 
essays appearing in the March number 
of The Forum, which is celebrating its 
fiftieth anniversary of publication with 
this issue. This article first appeared 
in this magazine twelve years ago, in 
March, 1924. It was penned at a time 
when Mrs. Buck had not even yet started 
to write her first novel of China, "East 
Wind, West Wind," the novel immediate- 
ly preceding "The Good Earth" which 
was to make her world famous as an 
able and realistic interpreter of China. 

"Beauty In China" is written in lovely, 
sentimental prose which brings a tang of 
nostalgia to those who love the glorious 
and ancient spirit of the Chinese people. 
Consider a few paragraphs: 

"Some of the rarest beauty in the world 
I have found in this old country, so re- 
served, so indolent for centuries, so care- 
less of what the world thinks of her. 

"For China does not express herself 
in show places. Even in Peking, that 
bourne of all tourists to the Far East, 
the things that one sees are not show 
places. The Forbidden City, the Temple 
of Heaven, the Llama Temple — these and 
a host of the others were built up slowly 
out of the life of the people, for the 
people themselves, with no thought ori- 
ginally of tourists eyes and dollars. 

"Go into any one of the great silk 
shops in Hangchow and you will find 
a dark, decorous, quiet interior, with 
shelves and shelves of neat packages fold- 
ed away, each with its price tags and 
symmetrically arranged .... when you 
have made known your wishes, (a clerk) 
selects carelessly half a dozen packages 
from the shelves and tear off the paper 
wrappers. Suddenly before your eyes 
bursts the splendor of stuffs whereof 
kings' robes are made. Brocaded satins 
and velvets, silks of marvelous brilliance 
and delicacy of shades are massed before 
you in a bewildering confusion. It is like 
a crowd of magnificently hued butterflies 
released from dull cocoons. You make 
your choice and the glory is shut away 
again into the dark. 

"That is China." 



about Chinese wrestlers of the north, their 
customs and their foibles as well as their 
rowdyism on the mat in the March issue 
of Esquire (supposedly a magazine for 
men but read most avidly also by the 
gentle sex). It is entitled "Wrestling: 
China Fashion," and is accompanied by 
four lithographs of wrestlers in action. 
Bennett describes the skill and clowning 
antics of a professional wrestler going 
through a match. The writer describes 
this particular wrestler as "an impressive 
object. His wresding jacket, barely cov- 
ering his shoulders, disclosed the largest, 
best-larded belly it has been my misfor- 
tune to see exposed to the biting winter 
air .... his arms were powerful, his 
shoulder muscles huge. In strict train- 
ing he would probably have weighed two 
hundred forty pounds .... As it was, he 
must have tipped the scales at three hun- 
dred." 

What happens when this giant wrestler, 
whose "felt shoes were at least size six- 
teen," takes on a lithe, 180 pounder is 
described with high humor. It was really 
a very entertaining match, and gives one 
the idea that the Chinese masses love to 
see a good tussle as well as the rest of 
humanity. 



"THE EGOIST" 

It is seldom that one is afforded the 
pleasure of reading English translations 
of modern Chinese short stories in Am- 
erican publications. Aside from the few 
which have appeared in the pages of 
Asia during the past two years the op- 
portunity is rare to see one in print. 

In the current issue of the Living Age, 
however, appears the translation of a 
short story by one of the most widely 
read writers in China. The story is 
called "The Egoist," written by Chang 
Tzu-p'ing and translated by another Chi- 
nese, Lin Yi-chin. 



g 



)^ZFS> G£i*J2>^Z7S> <F£±J&-*eZrS> tfC^CJ) 



I 



"WRESTLING: CHINA 
FASHION" 

James W. Bennett, one time professor 
in a Chinese university, short story writer, 
and old China hand, writes engagingly 

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RESTAURANT 

• 

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Between Grant and Stockton 



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Chang Tzu-p'ing is considered one of 
the best writers of love stories in the 
country today, although some of his best 
work is anything but stories of romance. 
Yet, it was as a writer of love tales that 
he made his reputation and millions of 
China's youths and litterateurs have 
laughed and shed tears over the struggles 
of his heroes and heroines who have loved 
and died in the manner of Romeo and 
Juliet. The youths of China, especially, 
find in his stories the expressions of their 
own emotions delicately and artfully 
conveyed. 

Chang Tzu-p'ing is one of the organi- 
zers of the '^Creative Association" 
(Chwang Tsao Hsieh) which is devoted 
to the creation of a proletarian literature. 

However, "The Egoist" is not a love 
story at all but an autobiographical tale 
which is intended to reveal the home life 
of a modern Chinese professor. Most 
Chinese writers of fiction are influenced 
by the Russians and Chang Tzu-p'ing is 
no exception. Witness the beginning of 
this story: 

"Nearly three years have passed since 
my wife and I with our child Chu Erh, 
left my native place to live in S — . On 
arriving here I became acquainted with 
my wife's aunt and her daughter, Ch'un 
Ying. They lived together in a dark, 
dirty room in the Big Buddha Temple — 
the poorest district in town. Ch'un Ying 
was about thirty years old, and was em- 
ployed in a bank on Jung Street. Both 
lived on her small salary, and Ch'un 
Ying used to say to my wife when visit- 
ing us: — "Mother is old and frequently 
ill. I can never feel at ease if I leave 
her alone while I go to the city." 

In one paragraph is sketched the chief 
protagonists of the tale, their relations 
to each other, the locale, the age, situa- 
tion in life and the devotion of one of 
the characters to her aged mother. Could 
Chekhov have done better? 

Incidentally, "The Egoist" is one of 
a collection of Chang Tzu-p'ing stories 
which have appeared under the title of 
"Spring Time in Mei Ling." A few of 
this author's famous novels are Tai Li, 
Off the Track, and Fei Hsu. 




Chinatown 

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Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINESE DICEST 



Pact 11 



COM MUNITY WELFARE 



ETHEL LUM 



CHINESE YOUNG 
PEOPLE'S CHRISTIAN 
CONFERENCE 

"The churches in our communities, in 
spite of their many weaknesses, still afford 
the best opportunity for self expression 
and social actions." This statement by 
the Committee on Inter-Church Coop- 
eration voices the consensus of opinion 
of the third Chinese Young People's 
Christian Conference at Lake Tahoe, 
August, 1935. So it is that these con- 
ferences have repeatedly emphasized the 
need for more young people's participa- 
tion in the work of the churches. 
How Conferences Started 

The idea of holding a summer con- 
ference for Chinese Christian young peo- 
ple had conception in a week-end retreat 
of a few Chinese Christian leaders at 
Mount Hermon in 1932. The benefits 
and inspiration derived from such a brief 
sojourn led to the desire of providing a 
similar experience on a wider scale for 
other young people. The Chinese Chris- 
tian Union Fellowship Council of S. F., 
therefore, assembled in March, 1933, re- 
presentatives from the Chinese Students' 
Christian Alliance, the Young Men's and 
Young Women's Christian Associations, 
the Epworth League Conference, and o- 
ther young people's organizations, to in- 
itiate plans for the conference. Many 
months of careful planning materialized 
in the opening of the first Conference 
at Zephyr Point, Lake Tahoe, July 3 
to 10, 1933. Fifty three full time dele- 
gates from various parts of the state, 
attended this initial conference, and 
brought back to their respective locali- 
ties such enthusiastic reports of the week's 
activities that the future success of the 
conference was definitely assured. 

The succeeding years found interest in 
the annual conference unabated, and the 
attendance at the 1934 and 1935 con- 
ferences increased to about eighty dele- 
gates. Not only was the Pacific Coast 
represented, but students and visitors 
from eastern states, Hawaii, and China 
also took advantage of this rare oppor- 
tunity for closer contact with their coun- 
trymen. It is needless to say that the 
influence of the conference has spread 
wherever the delegates have set foot. 

The Conference Program 

An enjoyable program successfully 
combining fun and study is planned for 
the seven days of the conference, as may 
be seen from a review of the last three 
held. The morning hours after break- 
fast were devoted to classes, lectures, and 



general discussions. The life and per- 
sonality of Jesus, prophets of the Old 
Testament, Christian missions, young 
people's organizations, Chinese culture 
and civilization furnished material for 
the lecture periods, while vocational prob- 
lems, social issues, racial problems, and 
inter-church relationships were among 
the subjects for general discussion. 

The afternoon hours were left to the 
discretion of the individual, who delight- 
ed in afternoon siestas, sun-baths, swim- 
ming, tennis, hiking, driving, group 
sports, or other pastimes. Exciting volley 
ball games and strenuous tennis tourna- 
ments were tests of competitive skill. 

The evening, with the cool of the night 
breeze, and the romance of the moonlit 
skies, was by far the most pleasant part 
of the day. Besides vespers, the holding 
of huge bonfires, music programs, or 
indoor entertainments brought the day's 
program to a perfect end. 

The resourcefulness and variety of tal- 
ent among the young people, guided by 
a genuine appreciation of simple fun, 
left not a dull moment in the day's acti- 
vities. Picturesque traditions such as the 
initiation of new members into the Pork- 
ers' Society and the Spooners' Sorority, 
and the coronation of the Emperor and 
Empress (or the Great Mogul and She- 
Mogul) of the Egyptian Empire, were a 
source of hilarious enjoyment. 

What Conferences Have Done 

Although the past conferences might 
not have realized all the hopes and as- 
pirations of the leaders and promoters, 
yet enough have been accomplished to 
repay them for the time and efforts ex- 
pended. The conferences have awakened 
ed in the young people a consciousness 
of a common goal, Christian service for 
their respective communities. That unity 
of spirit and warmth of fellowship found 
at the conferences have been transformed 
into a closer cooperation among young 
people of different denominations. Dev- 
elopment of initiative and stimulation 
of effort have been demonstrated in a 
conference planned and sponsored en- 
tirely by the young people themselves. 
Many who went to the conferences as a 



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matter of curiosity, came away with a 
vision of Christian living and a desire 
for acquiring more of this Christian ex- 
perience. 

Future Aims 

Because of the pioneer nature of the 
past conferences, emphasis has been laid 
almost entirely upon the stimulation of 
interest and participation in the confer- 
ence activities. The aim in the future 
will be to train young people more de- 
finitely for practical Christian leadership. 
Courses which will aid the Christan work- 
er towards more effective program plan- 
ning and more capable group leadership 
have been arranged for the coming con- 
ference. 

Leaders of 1936 Conference 

Among those busy in formulation of 
plans for the coming Tahoe conference, 
to be held August 2 to 9, are: 

Chairman: Alice P. Fong 

Vice-chairmen: Lim P. Lee, Ethel Lum 

Treasurer: Helen Chan 

Registrar: Edwar Lee 

Social Activities: Marie Tom, Albert 
Park Li 

Publicity: Edwin Owyang, Ira Lee 

Music: Victor Young 

Representative from S. F. Young Peo- 
ple's Christian Union: Mrs. Andrew 
Wu. 

For A Good Vacation 

For those who are debating whether 
it shall be the "seashore or the mount- 
ains" this summer, is offered a delightful 
week's vacation in a surrounding com- 
bining the best of both. "Imagination 
could create nothing more beautiful than 
the forest-covered slope, the rustic Con- 
ference buildings, the ever-changing co- 
lor of the lake, and the distant snow- 
capped mountains. Add to this picture 
the murmur of lake waves breaking on 
rugged rocks, the sighing of wind in tall 
pines, the tang of mountain air, and the 
reason is clear why more young people 
come to Lake Tahoe Conferences every 
year. A week in such a setting is an 
inspiration as well as a vacation." 



Note: Details as to cost, transporta- 
tion, and registration may be secured by 
writing Miss Alice P. Fong or Miss Nui 
Bo Tang, Chinese Y. W. C. A., 965 Clay 
St., San Francisco. Announcements of 
the conference faculty and the subjects 
to be studied will be made later. 



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Pap 12 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



SPORTS 



Fred George Woo- 



Washington Invades 
S. F. March 22 

Billed as the championship game for 
the Pacific Coast Chinese, the University 
of Washington Chinese cagers will tra- 
vel to San Francisco from Seattle to 
tackle the Troop Three Varsity five on 
Mar. 22, tentatively set for the French 
Court. 

The Washington cagemen are champ- 
ions of the Pacific Northwest, while the 
Scouts, conquerors of the Lowa Club of 
Los Angeles, are title-holders of the Wah 
Ying Bay Region Tournament. 

Either on Mar. 28 or 29 the invaders 
may play Shangtai at the French Court. 
This game would also be a big drawing 
card. In between the two games, on a 
week-day, Washington may meet the Chi- 
nese "Y" unlimiteds in an exhibition at 
the "Y" gym. 

Fresno Chinese Rod and 
Gun Club Wins 

Reinforced by the addition of Mack 
Soo Hoo, Alameda star, the Fresno Chi- 
nese Gun Club won four matches out of 
four last -week in a skeet shoot in Fresno 
at the Calwa Grounds. 

The Chinese team, composed of Soo 
Hoo, Ray Wong, Frank Wong, Tom 
Haw, and Henry Wong, defeated the 
Power Club, 106-85; the Fresno Police 
team No. 1, 109-106; the Fresno Elks 
team No. 2, 97-92; and the Fresno Police 
team No. 2, 101-85. 

Individual honors went to Frank 
Wong, shooting 24 out of 25, Ray 23, 
Mack 23, Tom 23 and Henry 16. Five 
hundred persons attended the skeet shoot- 
ing events, with seven teams firing be- 
sides two hundred individuals. 

• • 

WAH YEN BEATS SAN JOSE 

Sacramento's Wah Yen A. C. defeated 
the San Jose Chinese basketball team by 
a score of 34-29, at its home court at the 
Armory. Stars for the capital five were 
Richard Yee and Peter Chan. The fol- 
lowing other boys composed the Sacra- 
mento team, Edmund Yee, George Chan 
(manager), Dan Louie, Henry Fong, 
Howard Jan and Donald Yee. 

• • 

A tentative basketball contest is being 
scheduled between the Los Angeles Chi- 
nese Congregational Church and the 
Santa Barbara Chinese at the latter city 
on Saturday, Mar. 14. 

Patronize Our 



L. A. Pistol Team 
Takes Second 



Shangtai Loses Title Bid 
to Collegians 



The Los Angeles Pistol Team compet- 
ed in the open El Monte Rifle and Pistol 
Club shooting matches on Sunday, Mar. 
1, and carried off second place honors. 
Only four points separated the Chinese 
team from the winning club. 

For individual high honors, Robert 
Jowe led the field with a score of 280, 
four points ahead of his nearest competi- 
tor. Mrs. Ching placed second highest 
on the Chinese team with a good score 
of 266. 

• • 

Boxing Champ 

En Route to Hawaii 

Bob Chan, a 19-year old Chinese boy 
of Chicago who won the 135-lb. division 
title of the Golden Gloves Boxing Tour- 
nament, sailed last week on board the S. 
S. Mariposa for Honolulu, where he will 
compete with the Chicago team in exhi- 
bition matches against top-notch Hawaii- 
an amateur scrappers. 

• • 
DRAGON NINE LEADS 

The Dragon Indoor Baseball team, 
entered in the Sacramento Junior Col- 
lege Intramural League, is leading the 
parade with three wins and no losses. 
So far, those who turned in remarkable 
performances at bat and in the field are 
Tung S. Fong, Charles Fong, Donald 
Yee and Paul Yuke. Paul is the genial 
little hustling manager who keeps the 
players fighting till the last man's out. 

• • 
PLAYGROUND ACTIVITIES 

Two Chinese boys will take part in the 
quarter-finals of the City Playground 
marble tournament at the Hayward 
Playground on Mar. 21. Richard Wong 
in the Juniors and Robert Lum in the 
Seniors will be the Chinese Playground's 
representatives. 

It was also announced by Oliver 
Chang, Chinese playground director, that 
the kite-flying tourney will be held Mar. 
14 at the Funston Playground. 



Van Wormer 8C Rodrigues, Inc. 

Manufacturing Jewelers 

Club Pins and Rings 

Trophies and Medals 

<KZX) 

126 Post Street 
KEarny 7109 
San Francisco 



Chinatown's strongest bid for a 130 
pound division championship in the P. 
A. A. was thwarted when the Shangtai 
cagemen were turned back by the Univer- 
sity of California thirties in the finals 
at the Civic Auditorium last Friday night. 
The Chinese five was on the short end of 
a 44-28 score. 

It was a fast and hard-fought contest, 
although the Berkeleyans led through- 
out. It was not until the last minutes of 
play that the college men pulled away to 
a safe lead, the Shangtai players failing 
to cope with the taller height and longer 
reach of their opponents. 

Murphy Bill Quon, Chauncey Yip and 
Johnny Wong were the standouts for the 
Chinese quintet. One of the shining 
lights and main factors why "Cal"' won 
was Eddie Way Leong, who played the 
best game of his career. Besides being 
one of the high-scorers for the winners, 
Eddie played a beautiful defensive and 
passing game. 

The "Cal" boys will receive gold me- 
dals as a result of this win, while the 
Shangtais will have to be consoled with 
silver ones. 

• • 
YOUNG CHINESE WINS 
LEAGUE CONTEST 

Scoring with ease and at will, the Oak- 
land Young Chinese A. C. 115"s cagers 
swamped the Jewish Center with a final 
tally of 55-21, at the Jewish Community 
Center last week, in an All-Nations 
League tilt. 

Tanking eighteen points on a scoring 
spree, Sung Wong of the Young Chi- 
nese walked off with top-point honors, 
closely paced by George Chan who chalk- 
ed up twelve. Husband was outstanding 
for the losing five. 

• • 
SCOUTS TAKE TWO 

The Troop Three Scouts traveled to 
Palo Alto last Friday and came through 
with a double victory. The Varsity de- 
feated the Bombers 29-25, while the Jun- 
iors won from Paliclique, 36-32. 

Eddie Leong was the star for the Var- 
sity five, while outstanding for the Juniors 
was Charles Low. For the Paliclique 
team, Won Loy Chan and Ray Chew, 
with twelve points each, were the main- 
stays. 



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Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 13 



SPORTS 




Scouts' Foul Shot Tourney 

Troop Three's annual foul shoe tour- 
nament will be held this Sunday from 
seven a. m. to noon at the Commodore 
Stockton School court. The tourney is 
divided into six divisions, the 80's, 90's, 
100's 110's, 120's, and unlimiteds, the 
winners of which will receive gold medals. 
Division winners will compete for the 
trophy, which goes permanently to the 
boy who wins three times. Bing Chin 
and David Chong have been two-time 
winners and they will be fighting for per- 
manent possession of the trophy. Earl 
Wong and Henry Kan have been win- 
ners, each once. 

Young Chinese Clash With 
Sacs Sunday 

The strong Young Chinese A. C. quin- 
tet will play the Sacramento Chinese this 
Sunday evening, Mar. 15, at the Emery 
High gym, 47th and San Pablo Avenue, 
Oakland, with the preliminary slated for 
seven p. m. Admission will be fifteen 
cents. Probable starting line-up for Oak- 
land: Key Chinn and Stanton Yee at 
forward, Shane Lew a: center, and Ed- 
win Chan and Howard Joe at guards. 

Last year these two teams met twice, 
once in Oakland and once in Sacramento, 
with the Oaklanders winning both games. 
The contest at Oakland drew a large 
crowd last year, and another banner at- 
tendance is expected this Sunday. 

• • 

OAKLAND FIVE 
SWAMPS BERKELEY 

By a convincing tally of 62-34, the 
Oakland Young Chinese trounced the 
Berkeley Chinese A. C. last Friday night 
at the Westlake Jr. High court. Half 
score favored the winners 25-13. 

High scorers for Oakland were Key 
Chinn with 19, Shane Lew 13 and Stan- 
ton Yee 8. For the losers, Chong Lee 
and Git Jue, with 13 and 12 points, res- 
pectively, were the offensive mainstays. 

Patronize Our 



SPORTS SHORTS 

The Chinese Students' Club plans to 
give a second skating party on Thursday, 
March 19, from 10:15 p. m. to 1 a. m. 
at Rollerland, Oakland. Price is twenty- 
five cents with Chinese student body card 
and thirty-five cents for non card-holders 
and outsiders. 



Among the Chinese boys who took part 
in the bicycle race, sponsored by the 
Honolulu Cycling Club on Mar. 1, were 
Henry Chun, Henry F. Ching, Henry 
D. Ching, Robert Choi, Henry Tom, Her- 
bert Ching, and Henry Yuen. 

The San Francisco-Oakland National 
basketball game, originally planned for 
Mar. 15, at the French Court, has been 
definitely set for Mar. 22, probably in 
the afternoon. The change in date is 
due to the fact that the Young Chinese 
of Oakland plays the Sacramento Chi- 
nese cagers on the 15th, at Emeryville. 



Vincent Chinn, a ranking tennis play- 
er, has been seen at the Chinese Play- 
ground practicing vigorously for the 
coming season. 



Another basketball contest is being 
scheduled between the Oakland Crusad- 
ers and the Oakland National Dollar 
quintet. 



Steve Leong worked his way from a 
reserve to a regular position on the Gal- 
ileo High team, scoring ten points last 
week in an A. A. A. tilt against Mission. 

Shangtai's unlimited hoopmen will be 
entered in the coming J. A. F. cage 
tourney, it was reported. 



Joe Lee, the Oakland boy, is playing 
regularly with the San Francisco State 
College nine. Joe is an infielder. 



The Chinese Recreation Leaders de- 
feated the Fleishacker quintet 21-20 in 
a league game last Friday night at the 
Mission High gym. Henry Owyang and 
Frank Wong stood out for the victors. 



SEATTLE FIVE SPLITS TWO 

In a rough and tumble game filled with 
many fouls, the Waku Celestials again 
defeated the China Club 24-20 at the 
Baptist Court in Seattle last Thursday. 
Playing with but six men, Hing Chinn, 
Frank Mar, Gene Luke, Gordon Poon, 
David Woo and Mac Tang, the Waku 
vets combined effective shooting with a 
rugged defense to win. For the losers, 
Frank Kwan, Clarence Mar and Howie 
Mar showed up best. 

Strengthened by the return of Art 
Louie, Garfield High star, Young China 
nosed out the Waku Celestials 28-26 last 
Saturday at the Collins fieldhouse. Paced 
by the scrappy Ray Wong, the youngsters 
grabbed an 11-0 lead at the end of the 
first quarter, and at half, 13-2. In the 
second half, Waku started hitting the 
hoop, and coupled with the loss of two 
Young China stars, Ray and Vince Goon 
via the foul route, almost enabling them 
to catch up with the winners. 

• • 

CONFUCIAN SCHOOL HOLDS HIKE 

The senior and older students of the 
Confucian Chinese School participated 
in a hike to Marin hill last Saturday, 
tramping as far as Mt. Tamalpais. Young- 
er students went on a trip to the Fleish- 
acker Zoo on Sunday. 

• • 

During the past two weeks, the Y- 
Bulldogs have won three straight games. 
They are tied for first place with the Y- 
Tigers in the 80-lb. in the J. A. F. The 
players are Captain Harry Chin, Sonny 
Lau, Ronald Ong, Horace Ow, George 
Bow and Johnny Chin. Johnny weighs 
only 60 pounds, but has been a consistent 
star for the Bulldogs in every game. 

• • 

A son was born on Mar. 9 to the wife 
of Francis M. Yee, 835 Clay Street, San 
Francisco. 

• • 



Fred Hong Wong amassed fifteen 
points to enable his Poly Hi five to beat 
Balboa in an A. A. A. tilt Tuesday. Fred's 
total points for the season — 52 in seven 
games. 
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Page 14 



CHINESE DIG EST 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



FAR EAST 



WILLIAM HOY 



POLITICS IN INNER MONGOLIA 

Sandwiched between Japan-fostered "Manchukuo" 
and Sovietized Outer Mongolia lies the vast sparsely- 
settled plateau of Inner Mongolia. Strategically it is 
a natural buffer state separating the troops of two hos- 
tile countries, Japan and Russia. It is ruled by princes 



number of 3,500. It represents one and a half times 
less than the number of papers and periodicals published 
in the United States. The U. S. had 12,946 papers at 
the end of 1935. 

As a matter of fact, the number of collegiate, reli- 
gious, fraternal, agricultural and trade journals now 



who acknowledge as their political head Prince Teh published in America closely approximates the total 



Wang, who in turn acknowledges the nominal Chinese 
suzerainty over this nation of hardy nomads, descen- 
dants of the great Genghis Khan who conquered China 
seven centuries before. 

Two and a half years ago Prince Teh called together 
his princes to found a Mongolian self-rule movement. 
This princely caucus — momentous to Inner Mongolians 
— resulted in the Confederation of Inner Mongolian 
States, preamble, by-laws and all. Then Nanking was 
quietly informed that the Inner Mongolians would like 
to become an autonomous state. 

Prince Teh, who had learned his politics merely by 
watching the diplomatic hagglings of Russia and Japan 
within his hearing distance, declared that this move- 
ment for autonomy was "an effort to preserve Mongolia 
as a country and the Mongol people as a race. A strong 
autonomous government would be helpful to both Chi- 
na and Mongolia. Mongolia would form a buffer be- 
tween China and the countries around her on the north 
and east." 

Nanking Accedes 

Nanking, unable to stop this movement by diplomacy 
or military pressure, acquiesced. To preserve the 
bonds of political unity between China and Inner Mon- 
golia, Nanking went so far as to agree to the payment 
of $50,000 a month towards the support of this new 
government. Wireless outfits were thrown in for good 
measure in order that Nanking may keep in touch with 
Inner Mongolian developments. 

Rebellion Brewing 

Last week rumbles of serious trouble reached Premier 
and Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek. A telegram from 
one Yun Chih-hsien apprised Gen. Chiang that his men 
were ready to strike if money and ammunitions could 
be supplied. And Gen. Chiang, who has won revolu- 
tions and crushed uprisings during his active military 
career proceeded to meditate on the pros and cons of 
this new development. 



CHINA'S NEWSPAPERS 

Although strict censorship of news appearing in Chi- 
na's newspapers and periodicals have made journalism 
a precarious and unprofitable business during the past 
few years, yet the number of new publications have in- 
creased year by year until it now reaches the round 



number of publications in China. 

Leading Dailies 

China's oldest and most widely read dailies are the 
Shun Pao, the Sin Wan Pao, and the Shih Pao, although 
the circulation of anyone of these can not compare with 
a popular American daily. The Shun Pao is represen- 
tative of the conservative and intellectual group; the 
Sin Wan represents a group neither liberal nor con- 
servative; while the Shih Pao is strictly liberal. These 
three papers are published in Shanghai, which has 460 
more other publications, ranging from the most con- 
servative to the most radical in policy and dissemina- 
tion of news. 

Tabloids Appearing 

Lately several four-page tabloids selling for less than 
a U. S. penny were launched by several Shanghai pub- 
lishers and have already proven successful money-get- 
ters, chiefly because of its cheap price. These tabloids 
carry cabled world-wide news, domestic events, human 
interestfeatures and editorials. And surprisingly 
enough, one of these tabloids have been reported as 
achieving the 1,000,000 circulation mark. 



KWANGTUNG'S VILLAGE STATISTICS 

Some Kwangtung Provincial surveyors have been 
travelling through several southwestern districts during 
the past months. Their job: counting the number of 
villages in five specified densely populated and cultiva- 
ted districts. The purpose of their counting was not 
made clear but the result of the travelling-jaunts 
brought forth these figures: the District of Sunwui, 
245 villages; Toishan District, 334 villages; Hoy-ping 
District, 145 villages; Yin-ping, 109 villages; and 
Chikkai, 25 villages. 



CANTON BUILDING OWN GOVERNMENT 
RADIO STATION 

A 50-kilowatt government broadcasting station will 
soon rear its aerial tower over this modern south China 
capital. Financial arrangement have been agreed upon 
between the authorities and a private concern, and elec- 
trical and broadcasting equipments have been ordered 
for Canton. It is believed that the station will be ready 
for operation within fifteen months. 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Nge 15 



SAMPAN AND CARAVAN 



Szechuan Institutions of 
Learning to Effect Reforms 

Following the recommendations made 
by a group of educational experts who 
recently returned to the Capital after an 
investigation trip to Szechuan, the Mini- 
stry of Education, with a view to brnging 
the educational standard in West China 
in conformity with that of the more ad- 
vanced provinces, has issued instructions 
to the Department of Education of Sze- 
chuan to effect a partial reorganization 
of the institutions of higher learning in 
that province. 

According to the instructions sent out 
by the Ministry, a College of Agriculture 
is to be added to the National Universi- 
ty of Szechuan while its schools of Na- 
tural Science, Education, Political Sci- 
ence, and Economics, are to be combined 
into two schools as grouped above. Its 
School of Liberal Arts is to be maintained 
in its old status. 

The Ministry further instructs the Sze- 
chuan Department of Education to 
change the University of Chungking to 
a provincial institution and to abolish 
its schools of Liberal Arts and Agricul- 
ture. The students of the two abolished 
schools are to be transferred to the Na- 
tional University of Szechuan. 

The University of Chungking is to 
establish two new schools, namely Na- 
tural Science and Technology, with its 
original departments of Mathematics and 
Natural Science to be incorporated into 
the new school of Natural Science. The 
School of Technology is to have three 
departments, namely Civil, Metallurgical 
and Electrical Engineering. 

As soon as funds are available, the 
instruction adds, the University is to 
establish a School of Medicine. 

The provincial College of Agriculture, 
according to the instructions, is to be 
incorporated into the University of 
Chungking. 

In order that better attention may be 
paid to primary and middle school edu- 
cation, the instructions order that the 
primary and middle schools affiliate with 
the National University of Szechuan and 
its various schools be placed under the 
dnect control of the provincial Depart- 
ment of Education. 

• • 

A son was born on Feb. 27 to the wife 
of Edward Lee, 1031 Jackson Street, San 
Francisco. 



Severe Penalty to Be 
Imposed On Currency 
Offenders 

Under the chairmanship of President 
Sun Fo, the Legislative Yuan has adopted 
at one of its regular sessions recently a 
set of provisional regulations governing 
the punishment of national currency of- 
fenders. The following is a free trans- 
lation of the provisional regulations as 
adopted by the Legislative Yuan: 

1 .Those who destroy by melting the 
national silver coins or the bar silver 
minted by the Central Mint with intent 
to make profit thereby, shall be punished 
by imprisonment for a period of not less 
than one year and not more than seven 
years; the offenders may also be subject 
to a fine of not more than #1,000 in ad- 
dition to imprisonment. 

2. Those who smuggle national silver 
coins or silver bar minted by the Central 
mint or silver metal in general out of the 
territorial limits of the Republic of China 
with intent to make profit thereby, shall 
be punished by imprisonment for life or 
for a period of not less than seven years; 
the offenders may also be subject to a 
fine of not less than the amount smuggled 
and not more than five times its value. 

3. Those who counterfeit or alter the 
bar silver minted by the central mint or 
reduce the weight thereof and utter, col- 
lect, or deliver the same with intent to 
utter, shall be punished according to the 
punishment prescribed under those pro- 
visions of the Criminal Code regarding 
the offences of counterfeiting national 
currency. 

4. The national silver coins or the bar 
silver minted by the central mint, or 
silver metal in general, illegally me'ted 
or smuggled abroad, shall be confiscated, 
whether the same belongs to the offender 
or not. 

5. Those who attempt to commit the 



CHINA MAIL 



SHIPS ARRIVING FROM CHINA: 

President Grant (Seattle) Mar. 
18; President Pierce (San Francisco) 
Mar. 31; President Jefferson (Seattle) 
Apr. 1. President Coolidge (San Fran- 
cisco) Apr. 8; President Jackson (Se- 
attle) Apr. 15; President Lincoln (San 
Francisco) Apr. 28; President McKinley 
(Seattle) Apr. 29. 

SHIPS LEAVING FOR CHINA: 

President Hayes 
(San Francisco) Mar. 13. President Mc- 
Kinley (Seattle) Mar. 14; President Hoo- 
ver (San Francisco) Mar. 20; President 
Wilson (San Francisco) Mar. 27; Presi- 
dent Grant (Seattle) Mar. 28. 



PRINTING AND ENGRAVING 
BUREAU CLOSES 

The Ministry of Finance in Peiping 
announced that its bureau of printing 
and engraving had suspended business, 
when the staff members refused to work 
unless they received several months' back 
pay. 

Recently the bureau began reducing 
wages and cutting down the staff, but 
could not make both ends meet, with the 
result that one of the oldest and best 
equipped printing establishments in Chi- 
na was ordered closed by the Ministry. 
• • 

crimes prescribed under these regulations 
shall be punished. 

6. These regulations shall come into 
force from the date of promulgation. 



CHINESE DIGEST 

868 Washington St., San Francisco, California. 

Sir: Enclosed find $ for 

period of The Chinese Digest. 
Name 



Address. 
City 



State- 



Six Months #1.25; 1 Year #2.00;Foreign #2.75 Year. 



rage 16 



CHINESE DIC EST 



Friday, March 13, 1936 



TESTED WORSTED 

Suits for Spring 



■€'[Ms^S& ■ 




Every one of them passed this 

3RD DEGREE 



Has It Style? 

Unmistakably, Spring 1936 is the 
accented waistline, softer construc- 
tion and oversquare patterns in 
Tested Worsteds. Single and double 
breasted models. 

Will It Wear? 

Each suit has been "given the works" 
— TESTED for weight, thread 
count, rubbing, fast color, cleaning 
(over 75 inspections). If it doesn't 
pass, "thumbs down" 




Is It Well Made? 

This suit's interlining, seams, hand- 
felling (things you know little about 
— but we do) must be okay. If they 
aren't your suit won't retain its fit 
and style. 

Is It a Value? 

The resources and ability of Moore's 
have gone into this, the finest suit 
that #27.50 can buy. That's a strong 
statement — but we stand ready to 
prove it. 



MOORE'S 

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

840 Market 141 Kearny « 1450 B'way 

Opp. Emporium Near Sutter Oakland 

(^Chinese Salesman here: Edward Leong) 







COMMENT * - SOCIAL - - SPOiiTS 




y a weekly ruBUCAiioti M6WS '* CULTUtfi • * CIT£££7U££ sam «a»NCtsco.Civ»fefti>t» ^ 



Vol. 2, No. 12 



March 20, 1936 



Five Cents 



CHINESE CONSOLIDATED BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION 




— Photo by Chinese Digest 



As our own Court of Arbitration, the Chung Wah 
Association in San Francisco presents an impressive 
entrance behind which the elders of Chinatown sit in 
quiet and learned judgment on matters of importance. 

Within may be found a highly elaborate rug on which 
is woven an authentic map of China giving on a reduced 
scale the exact latitude and longtitude of the country, 
and showing the various railroad services between lead- 
ing cities. 

Located on Stockton Street, the two upper stories are 
given over to the housing of the Chung Wah Chinese 
School. 



Page 2 



CHINESE DIGEST 



March 20, 1936 



FAR EAST 



WILLIAM HOY 



CHINA PROPOSES, JAPAN OPPOSES 

Not long ago Nanking's Finance Minister H. H. Kung 
looked around for a dependable and expert finance ad- 
visor. Under Finance Minister H. H. Kung, China 
went on a managed paper currency standard last Novem- 
ber and ever since he has been losing a great amount of 
sleep trying to fight off the specter of inflation from 
hovering over the nation's financial system. 

Casting his line into Shanghai's banking circles the 
Finance Minister hooked one K. P. Chen (Chen Po), 
general manager of the Shanghai Commercial and Sav- 
ings Bank. Appointed an advisor, he was recently told 
to head a Chinese mission to Europe and the United 
States to investigate currency conditions there. 

As soon as this news came through Nanking's Jap- 
anese embassy, it was not long before Japan's official 
opposition was expressed through the voice of a spokes- 
man. According to his information, said the spokesman, 
Mr. Chen's real mission is connected with the recently 
authorized domestic loans of 120,000,000 dollars (Chi- 
nese) which is being floated for a contemplated railway 
building program and is intended to be the foundation 
upon which to secure foreign loans and credits for this 
construction work. 

"There are several reasons why we cannot approve 
any future foreign investment in railroads in this coun- 
try," continued the spokesman. He proceeded to give 
explicit reasons, viz: 

1. China's railroads are government-owned; conse- 
quently loans for railway uses necessarily carry political 
implications; 

2. China must not overlook Japan's vast economic in- 
terests in the northern provinces; 

3. Japan is at present a creditor to China on railroads 
to some 500,000,000 Chinese dollars (this figure can 
only be arrived at by adding the notorious Nishihara 
loans which the Chinese Republic has never acknow- 
ledged as bona fide debts) . 

Although this statement was ostensibly given as a 
warning, Nanking apparently paid no heed. A fort- 
night ago Mr. K. P. Chen prepared to sail for the 
United States. 

SINO-JAPANESE COOPERATION 

From Shanghai a fortnight ago came the announce- 
ment of the formation of the Sino-Japanese Trade 
Council, organized for the purpose of exploiting Chi- 
na's resources and laying the groundwork for invest- 
ments in the mining industries, railways and agricultural 
developments in the rich Yangtze Valley. 

On the surface this new development in the economic 
relations between China and Japan seemed above board, 
untinged with ulterior motives on the latter's part. Ne- 
vertheless, the news was ominous to China's political- 
minded populace, and indicated growing pressure on 
Japan's part to force China to accept her economic as- 
sistance. To Great Britain, which has always looked 
upon the Yangtze Valley as her own sphere of influ- 



ence, the news was a blow below the belt. It meant that 
Japan had won another round in her fight with Britain 
for the economic control of China. 
Aims Explained 

In explaining the aims of the Sino-Japanese Trade 
Council, its organizers declared it will utilize Japanese 
capital to develop China's raw materials, chief among 
which will be cotton, wool and minerals. Japanese ex- 
perts will be employed to help China produce these 
materials in great quantities, which will be mostly 
bought by the former for her growing industries. If 
China could produce more cotton in the future it means 
that ultimately Japan would gradually decrease her 
cotton imports from the United States. At the present 
time one-half of Japan's imported cotton is from the 
United States. 

Japanese capital will be also employed to develop 
mines, building railways and stimulating further agri- 
cultural productions throughout Central China. Other 
lines of economic schemes the results of which would 
be advantageous to Japan would also be included in the 
Trade Council's proposed projects. 

Council Includes Bankers and Industrialists 

On the board of directors of the Sino-Japanese Trade 
Council are an equal number of Chinese and Japanese 
bankers of repute, industrial experts, members of in- 
vestment interests. One of the Chinese members is the 
general manager of the Shanghai Commercial and Sa- 
vings Bank. Japan's gigantic investment house of Mit- 
subishi and Matsui are also represented. 

North China Program 

As the Sino-Japanese Trade Council ponders its pro- 
gram for the development of the Yangtze region, Jap- 
anese capital of another color is getting ready to pour 
into North China for the development of certain "basic 
industries". While the Sino-Japanese Trade Council 
may be purely a matter of economic cooperation, the 
Japanese program in North China is out and out econ- 
omic penetration of China at the point of a sword. 

Chief emissaries of Japanese military and economic 
penetration into the Asiatic mainland are the sword- 
rattlers of the Japanese Army and the empire vision- 
aries of the South Manchurian Railway. With their 
approval and under their direction a broad program 
aiming at the eventual conquest of China proper is 
being worked out. 

Chief phase of this program is the construction of 
railways which will facilitate the transportation of raw 
materials for shipment to "Manchukuo" or Japan as 
well as for swift movement of troops. 

The Japanese have long been interested in the huge 
iron and coal deposits of Shantung province, and is now 
about prepared to work them. According to their own 
experts, Shantung has about 4,800,000,000 tons of coal. 

Quantity production of cotton in this region will also 
be a major part of Japan's North China development 
program. The Japanese army is confident that with 
North China in its tight grip at present, there should be 
no barriers to prevent them from putting their program 
into operation. 



March 20, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 3 



CHINATOWNIA 



Advisor Sees Unity of China 

Dr. Robert Lewis, who has held the po- 
sition of Nanking Government's political 
advisor to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs 
for the last five years, arrived aboard the 
S. S. Hoover. 

Dr. Lewis stated that he does not be- 
lieve that China has any great fear of 
Japan, as the Japanese have enough to 
worry about at home. 

General Chiang Kai-shek is the most 
powerful premier thei Nanking govern- 
ment has seen in many years, Dr. Lewis 
believes, and under his guidance, unifica- 
tion of the Chinese under one single 
government is near. 

• • 
SACRAMENTO STUDENTS' 
ASSOCIATION INAUGURATED 

Formal inauguration of the Sacramento 
Chinese Students' Association was held 
Sunday, March 15, at the Chung Wah 
School. Every Chinese organization in 
Sacramento took part in the program. 

The officers of the Association were 
installed by Mr. Fong Yue Poo, Presi- 
dent of the Chinese Six Companies of 
Sacramento. 

An one act play which the students 
put on was highly commended for its 
originality and superb acting. 

• • 

A correction is made at this time that 
the donor of the book, "China Speaks", 
to the Portland Public Library was Lee 
Ki Lum. 

• • 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

The cuts for the front page of last 
week's issue of the Chinese Digest were 
secured through the courtesy of Californ- 
ians, Inc. 



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Official Denies 
McClatchy Charges 

Charges of V. S. McClatchy, executive 
secretary of the California Joint Immi- 
gration Committee, that a pro-Japanese 
text book has been furnished during the 
present school year to additional schools 
in Hawaii were officially denied by Oscar 
F. Shepard, head of the private Punahou 
School in Honolulu who is also chairman 
of the text book committee of the Institute 
of Pacific Relations, Hawaiian group. 

Mr. Shepard issued the denial after a 
recent meeting of teachers and principals 
of many of Honolulu's schools. He 
stated: 

"At our committee meeting, attention 
was directed to press clippings criticizing 
one of these texts as pro-Japanese pro- 
paganda. These statements are being 
scrutinized and if some are found to be 
incorrect or not substantiated, they will 
be deleted. Contrary to the statements 
in these critical articles, none of these 
texts has been distributed to Hawaiian 
schools in the past year." 

It was explained at the institute that 
the texts are on trial and use in only one 
of Honolulu's public schools, the Mc- 
Kinley High School, where the majority 
of the students are of Japanese-American 
parentage. 

It was recently charged by Mr. Mc- 
Clatchy that the text book was filled with 
misrepresentations and propaganda fa- 
voring Japan, and that it is used in Hon- 
olulu public schools in spite of protests, 
with the authors reported urging that it 
be endorsed by teachers organizations 
throughout the United States (Chinese 
Digest, Mar. 6). 

• • 

TENNIS CLUB HONORS MEMBER 

Many attended the monthly meeting of 
the Los Angeles Tennis Club last Sun- 
day at N. S. G. S. Hall to honor Dr. 
Edward Lee, the retiring president. As 
a token of appreciation from, the club, 
an attractive little gavel was presented to 
him by Miss Ruth Kim, the chairman. 

The club voted to have a handicap 
tournament for all its members beginning 
March 29, Hamilton Gee, athletic man- 
ager, announced. 

The first issue of "The Racquet", a 
monthly, was distributed to all those pre- 
sent. Dr. William D. Lee was elected 
business manager, and Milton Quon, art 
editor, who appointed Al Hing and Sadie 
permanent editor with Ralph Wong as 
Sam as his assistants. 



CHINESE NEEDLEWORK GUILD 

The Needlework Guild of America is 
an organization of mothers and philan- 
thropic women whose purpose is to make 
new garments for needy school children. 
Always interested in the welfare of our 
children, Miss Anna Croughwell, princi- 
pal of the Commodore Stockton School, 
organized the Chinese mothers' section 
of this national organization, the Wun 
Gum, three years ago with the help of 
many interested mothers. Some of these 
ladies are: Mesdames May Chan, G. B. 
Lau, B. S. Fong, C. M. Chow, Hong 
Guey, Leong Chong, D. Y. Wong, and 
Betty Joe. Since its organization many 
have become members. 

Although the work of the three past 
years has been gratifying, these ladies are 
campaigning for a larger membership in 
order that the needs of the ever-increas- 
ing school population might be adequate- 
ly met. Among the many interested wo- 
men who have pledged their support are: 
Mrs. Charles Gee, Mrs. Chang Ho, Mrs. 
F. Y. Lowe, Mrs. S. B. Quan, and Miss 
Sunru Chang, Nanking Aviatrix. 

An anniversary meeting was held at 
Tao Yuan last Saturday with the wife 
of the School Superintendent, Mrs. Ed- 
win Lee, Miss Croughwell, Mrs. Don- 
aldson, the President of the Needlework 
Guild, and others as guests. 

It is reported that for the contribution 
of over a hundred garments made by 
our mothers, more than 400 pieces of 
clothing have been distributed by the 
Needlework Guild last year to needy 
children of Chinatown. 

• • 

OAKLAND CHINESE CENTER 

Members of the Oakland Chinese Cen- 
ter are busily engaged in shaping up their 
new quarters before staging a public 
welcome. 

Stylish furniture are arriving daily. A 
newly purchased couch and its accom- 
panying easy chairs of an attractive early 
California pattern were among the first 
to meet with the club's approval. In 
about two weeks when arrangements are 
completed, the Center will hold an open- 
house for two days. 

The Center is extending an invitation 
to all Chinese organizations in Oakland 
without clubrooms to hold their meetings 
there. The Waku Auxiliary plans to 
accept this gracious offer and will reci- 
procate with a furniture gift. 

As informed by the committee in 
charge of funds for furnishings, a four- 
teen day drive netted nearly #300 from 
the members. 



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Page 4 



CHINESE DIGEST 



March 20, 1936 



CHINATOWNIA 



TEACHER ARRESTED FOR 
WHIPPING STUDENT 

Chin Boon Gan, a teacher at the Mee 
Wah Chinese School in Sacramento, was 
one of those old-fashioned Chinese tea- 
chers who believed that "to spare the rod 
is to spoil the child." Last week, how- 
ever, he had plenty of time to think over 
the wisdom of such methods of punish- 
ing mischievous students. 

Chin administered a whipping to a 
12-year-old student, the son of Harry 
Lee, who complained that the beating was 
without provocation. The teacher's ver- 
sion was that the whipping was quite jus- 
tified because his pupil had been so dis- 
respectful as to swear at him. 

Nevertheless, Chin was arrested. 

• • 
SEATTLE CHTTTER-CHATTER 

Dorothy and Eddie Luke voted at the 
Polls in last Tuesday's city elections . . . 
Everytime Gordon Poon takes his "jack- 
knife" shot at the basket, the fans roar, 
especially the girls . . . Among the 
10,000 that jammed the pavilion to see 
Washington win the Northwest title from 
O. S. C. were Butch Luke and Frank 
Nipp . . . Edward. Goon Wong claims 
he's "Chinatown's sidewalk inspector" . . . 
One of the stars of the China Club-Waku 
battles was Clarence Mar, Garfield. Hi 
star of years ago, who without any prac- 
tice whatever stepped into a suit, and 
showed the old-time form at its best . . . 
Little Ruthie Hwang rehearsing faithfully 
for her part in the "Student Prince" 
to be presented at Roosevelt Hi soon . . . 
Billy Hong bemoaning the fact that he 
was eliminated in the semi-finals of the 
all-city Checkers tournament by the fel- 
low who eventually won the champion- 
ship . . . Ray Wong and Mosey Kay 
driving down Second Avenue after mid- 
night Saturday . . . Final exams at the 
"U" this week, and everyone worried ex- 
cept David Eng, who has dropped out 
due to the flu . . . Jack Wong wondering 
when Miss Eva Lee will answer . . . The 
Young China Scandal sheet getting scan- 
dalous . . . Majorie Lew Kay, ex-Seattle- 
ite, was the Lingnam U football team's 
mascot during the past season. 

• • 
R. O. T. C. AWARDS 

R. O. T. C. awards were issued to Ger- 
ald Lee and Bruce Quon of Oakland 
High School, Oakland, in an assembly 
by Major W. I. Sherwood, military in- 
structor of the school. 

• • 

Mr. and Mrs. Yuk Eng of Seattle are 
the proud parents of a 1\ pound baby 
girl born March 2nd. 

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Brilliant Dissertation 

Submitting what University of South- 
ern California faculty members termed 
one of the most brilliant dissertations 
written at the Trojan institution. Row- 
land Jung Tsung Loh, Chinese graduate 
student was awarded recendy the doctor 
of philosophy degree in sociology, By 
R. B. von KleinSmid, president. By 
means of previously undeciphered in- 
scriptions on long buried bones and tor- 
toise shells uncovered in China, Loh has 
reconstructed the social organization of 
the Shang Dynasty which flourished in 
ancient China from 1766 to 1122 B. C. 

"Loh's dissertation is a distinct con- 
tribution to historians," Dr. R. D. Hunt, 
dean of the graduate school declared. 

• • 
LUCKY SAM 

Last week a Chinatown lad — big, stout 
and in his 'teens — considered himself its 
luckiest citizen. Reason: he had just been 
made the recipient of a present. The 
present: a brand new black and green 
motorcycle of the latest type. 

Sammy Kan was the fortunate lad. 
For his timely present he had to thank 
his father , Sam Kan, a former officer of 
the U. S. Immigration Service and now 
a government agent stationed in Hono- 
lulu. 

Sammy is a studant at Galileo and a 
wizard with the harmonica. His friends 
are wondering whether he will grow up 
to be a motorcycle cop. Anyway, he's 
Chinatown's luckiest boy. 

• • 

A son was born on Mar. 3 to the wife 
of Frank S. Dong, 36 John Street, San 
Francisco. 

• • 

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Wah Kue Chinese 
School of Watsonville 

Increased enrollment has brought about 
the renovating of the Wah Kue 
Chinese School in Watsonville. The 
board of trustees' room on the upper 
floor was changed into a classroom, for 
the lower grades, while the upper grades 
will remain on the lower floor. 

Mr. Joe Yum Tse, formerly of Court- 
land, and Mr. Santon Tsoo from St. 
Mary's Chinese School in San Francisco 
are the two new faculty members. With 
the addition of the new teachers, the 
school has advanced greatly and modern 
methods of teaching are being used. 
There are forty-eight students now at- 
tending the school. 

Mr. Tse has organized a student club 
and will act as advisor. The method of 
holding offices are planned differently 
from the usual parliamentary rules. To 
acquaint the students with the procedure 
of holding meetings, the offices will be 
rotated and all students will be required 
to speak in Cantonese. 

Under the supervision of Mr. Tse, the 
school will soon start training for their 
drum and bugle corps. It is the fond 
hope of the school to have the corps in 
shape for the annual 4th of July activi- 
ties. 

As their first social gesture, Mr. Tse 
invited Mr. Tsoo, Mr. Wong Ging Soon, 
the principal, and the officers of the club 
to a dinner dance at Soo Chow Tea Room 
last Sunday. Each member who attended 
was required to entertain in some manner. 
Miss Iris Wong, president, sang "Alone.'' 
Misses Mary Lee and Marian Dong gave 
a Buck and Wing dance. Due to the 
insistence of the students, Mr. Tse sang 
a little Chinese love melody. Other 
members gave riddles and speeches. The 
evening ended in dancing and gave as- 
surance of the future social success of 
the club. 



AGENT LIKES CHINESE DESIGN 

Slowly gatherng momentum, the move 
of many merchants to turn Chinatown 
back to Chinese types of architecture has 
received the hearty support of Mr. Mel- 
ville Wilson, of Norris, Beggs and Base. 

Shanghai Bazaar, on Grant Avenue, is 
the latest store to be styled along Chinese 
designs, and it was mainly through Ml 
Wilson, who in corroboration with the 
A. M. Hardy Contracting Co., made 
one of our largest bazaars into something 
that will no doubt attract the eyes of 
many to the "real Chinese stor 
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March 20, 1936 



CHINESE DIGEST 



Page 5 



TEA AN D LANTERNS 



CLARA CHAN 



"Big Little Broadcast' 
Soon 



Are .... you .... listening? 

You will want to be on Saturday, Mar. 
28, at 8:00 p. m. when the 965 Club 
presents "The Big Little Broadcast of 
1936". 

Favorite radio programs will come to 
life on that evening, each contributing 
its share of enchanting music, sparkling 
comedy, and hair-raising mystery. 

Robert Poon, the man of a thousand 
wisecracks, the teller of long stories and 
tall tales, will be at the microphone to 
introduce the twenty-odd young Chinese 
artists who will make the program one 
which you will not willingly miss nor 
easily forget. 

"We think the event will be unique 
in the history of entertainment in this 
community," said Marie Tom and Clara 
Lee, joint chairmen of the planning com- 
mittee. "And as a major portion of the 
proceeds will be used to send some young 
man or woman from this community to 
the Western Summer School for Work- 
ers, we are confident of the support of the 
community." Serving with them on the 
committee are Mabel Lowe, Delma Mark, 
and May Louie. 

• • 

HERE WE ARE, SWANEE! 

Would you recognize your favorite girl 
friend if she appeared in pickaninnie 
garb and charcoal? 

If you're accustomed to seeing "her" 
all prettied and rosied, save the dates of 
June 6 and 7, and you'll get a chance 
to find out that she can look just as lovely 
with her hair all "done up'' and two 
great big brown eyes smiling at you from 
a sea of ebony — believe us! And if you 
won't believe us, it will be worth your 
while to find out for yourself when the 
Square and Circle Club presents their 
"Dixie Varieties". 

• • 

SEATTLE FAREWELL PICNIC 

A combination quarter-end meeting, 
and farewell to the cagemen was held by 
the Seattle Chinese Students Club, Sun- 
day, March 15, in the form of a picnic 
at Juanita Park on the shores of Lake 
Washington. A jolly time was had by 
all except those members of the Student's 
hoop squad who will be unable to make 
the trip south. Fried chicken, bonfires, 
(indoors) toasted marshmallows, and a 
little rain outside made the excursion one 
to be remembered. 

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Girl Reserves' Tea Party 

One of the most colorful events for 
the week in Portland is the Silver Tea 
with which the Chinese Girl Reserves of 
the Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion will entertain Saturday afternoon at 
the home of their advisor, Mrs. Stanley 
Chin. For several years the girls have 
entertained with a similar affair to raise 
funds to send a delegate to the Girl Re- 
serves' summer conference at Seabeck, 
Washington, and to assist in the care of 
a boy and girl in the Ming Quong Home 
at Oakland. 

Presiding at the tea table wil